B.S. Degree in Forensic Science

Bachelor of Science
in Forensic Science
Career Opportunities
Certification
Curriculum Overview
Plan of Study
Semester Schedule Sample
Course Descriptions
Internships
Admissions Requirements
Application/Admissions
Department Sponsors
Why Choose C.W. Post?
Scholarships
Student Health Insurance Requirements & Waiver
Contact Us

 

 

 

Are you intrigued by crime scene investigations, police work and the examination of evidence? Would you like to uncover clues to a crime by conducting scientific testing on blood, DNA and fingerprints? Can you see yourself playing a role in the high-tech worlds of crime, biomedical science, law and justice? If so, then you should be thinking about a career in Forensic Science.

Forensic science is the application of scientific principles and techniques to the legal process; it is the quest for truth, aided by state-of-the-art technology and the scientific approach. It is used to determine counterfeit materials, the validity of signatures on legal documents, business fraud, the source of pollutants in environmental issues and the relationship between suspects and crimes.

Forensic scientists play a role in criminal, civil and regulatory legal proceedings where their expertise may be required by the prosecution or the defense, the plaintiff or the respondent, or the government or private industry. They study DNA, blood and other body fluids, textiles, footwear, footprints and tire tracks, flammables, documents and signatures, pollutants and much more. They work in crime labs, law enforcement agencies, police departments, toxicology and pathology labs, medical examiner’s and coroner’s offices and as independent forensic consultants. It is the field where science and technology meet the law-Forensic Science.

Bachelor of Science in Forensic Science

The C.W. Post Campus of Long Island University offers the Bachelor of Science degree program in Forensic Science, which educates students in the theory and methodology of the gathering and interpreting of information that may be used in a court of law. The program integrates lecture courses with laboratory work, field internships and cooperative education experiences in crime laboratories and other related agencies. Classes are taught by practicing forensic scientists, medical professionals, and C.W. Post professors who have an active interest in the field. In addition, the program taps the professional resources of Nassau County, Suffolk County and New York City crime labs, health departments and medical examiners’ offices and the professionals who practice there. Graduates will be prepared for entry-level jobs in forensics and graduate study.

Career Opportunities

Graduates of the program will have a strong scientific and technical background in forensic science and a solid foundation in criminal justice and legal theory. This will qualify them to pursue graduate education in forensic science and/or entry-level positions in:

  • crime laboratories
  • forensic laboratories
  • law enforcement agencies
  • drug enforcement laboratories
  • private industry
  • health departments
  • medical examiners’ offices
  • administrative agencies

Certification

Graduates will be prepared to take the following national certification exams in forensic science: General Knowledge Examination sponsored by the American Board of Criminalistics and the Certified Medical Investigator (level 1) exam sponsored by the American College of Forensic Examiners Institute.

Curriculum Overview

All students in the B.S. in Forensic Science degree program will take C.W. Post’s standard Core Curriculum, including courses in English or foreign language, the social sciences, fine arts, political science or economics, history and philosophy. In addition, students will take a series of Natural Sciences core courses including biology, chemistry and physics (35 credits) and the following specialized science core classes: Principles of Genetics, Quantitative Analysis, Biochemistry and Diagnostic Techniques in Molecular Pathology (16 credits)

Plan of Study

College Core Credits
College 101 (not required for transfer students) 1
Laboratory Science (fulfilled by BIO 7, 8 or 103, 104) 8
Language/Literature 6
History/Philosophy (HSMB 19) 9
Mathematics (fulfilled by MTH 7) 4
Political Science/Economics 6
Fine Arts 6
Social Sciences 6
College Competencies (Writing, Oral, Library, Computer) 6-9
Total 52-55

Natural Sciences Core (9 courses – 35 Credits) Credits
BIO 7 or BIO 103 4
BIO 8 or BIO 104 4
BIO 141 Biostatistics 3
CHM 3, 4 Principles of Chemistry 8
CHM 21, 22 Organic Chemistry 8
PHY 11, 12 College Physics 8

Specialized Sciences Core (5 courses – 19 Credits) Credits
BIO 107 Principles of Genetics 4
CHM 37 Quantitative Analysis 4
CHM 71 Biochemistry 4
HSMB 80 Immunology 3
HSMB 256 Diagnostic Techniques in Mol. Pathology 4

Forensic Sciences Courses (7 courses – 21 Credits) Credits
ANP 51 Forensic Anthropology 3
CHM 39 Forensic Instrumentation 4
CRJ 76 Criminal Procedure 3
HSMB 71 Introduction to Criminalistics 3
HSMB 255 Toxicology 3
HSMB 257 Forensic Molecular Techniques 3
HSMB 271 Forensic Internship (Fall, Spring or Summer) 2

Suggested Electives Credits
BIO 201 Molecular Biology 4
BIO 250 Microbiology 4
CHM 24 Spectroscopic Identification 3
CRJ 35 Forensic Psychology and Violent Criminal or 3
  PSY 43 Forensic Psychology, Law & Human Behavior  
CRJ 47 Arson 3
HSMB 51 Pharmacology 3
HSMB 63 Intro to Hematology/Phlebotomy 3
HSMB 90 Microbiology in Health Sciences 4

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Semester Schedule Sample

FRESHMAN

SOPHOMORE

FALL

SPRING

FALL

SPRING

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

BIO 103 - Mech. Life Proc. or BIO 7

4

BIO 104 - Strat. of Life or BIO 8

4

CHM 21 - Organic Chem I

4

CHM 22 - Organic Chem II

4

CHM 3 - Princip of Chem I

4

CHM 4 - Princip of Chem II

4

Oral Competency

0

CHM 37 - Quant Analysis

4

ENG 1 - Composition

3

ENG 2 - Composition Argument/Analysis

3

HSMB 19 - Medical Ethics (PHL 19 core)

3

College Core

9

MTH 7 - Calculus & Analyt Geometry I

4

Library Competency

0

BIO 141 - Biostatistics

3

Computer Competency

0

COLL 101 - Freshman Seminar

1

ANP 51 - Forensic Anthropology

3

College Core

3

   
   

College Core

3

   
               

Total Credits

16

Total Credits

17

Total Credits

16

Total Credits

17

JUNIOR

SENIOR

FALL

SPRING

FALL

SPRING

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

HSMB 71 - Introduction to Criminalistics

3

CHM 71 - Biochemistry

4

HSMB 257 - Forensics Molecular Techniques (FSC 3)

4

PHY 12 - College Physics

4

BIO 107 - Principles of Genetics

4

HSMB 256 - Diag. Tech. In Molecular Path.

4

CRJ 76 - Criminal Procedure

3

College Core

8-9

HSMB 80 - Immunology

3

CHM 39 - Forensic Instrumentation (FSC 2)

4

HSMB 255 - Toxicology

3

   

College Core

3

Electives

3

PHY 11 - College Physics

4

   
   

HSMB 271 - Forensic Science Internship (FSC 200)

2

       
    (Fall, Spring or Summer)        

Total Credits

13

Total Credits

17

Total Credits

14

Total Credits

12-13

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FORENSIC SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES

ANP 51 FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY
This course is a study of the scientific techniques developed in physical anthropology to help identify human remains and understand the circumstances surrounding death. It also examines the contribution of forensic anthropology to the medicolegal community involved in solving both criminal and humanitarian cases of unexplained deaths. Three hours lecture – 3 credits. Prerequisites: ANP 1 or permission.
Spring 3 credits.

BIO 107 PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN GENETICS
A study of Mendelian inheritance, multiple gene inheritance, gene structure and function, gene mapping mutation, gene regulation, evolutionary genetics and other basic concepts in genetics. The laboratory will consist of exercises utilizing microorganisms, viruses, insects, and plants. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory/field work.
Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: BIO 103 & 104 or BIO 7 & 8.
Fall 4 credits.

CHM 37 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS
A study of classical gravimetric and volumetric quantitative determinations. The theory and practice of some of the more modern techniques of instrumental method are studied. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory.
Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 4.
Spring 4 credits.

CHM 39 FORENSIC INSTRUMENTATION
This course gives the student a basic understanding of the theory and applications of the methods of modern analytical chemistry as applied to forensic problems. It will show how spectroscopy, separation methods and other techniques can be applied to forensic tasks such as illicit drug analyses, residue analyses, forensic toxicology, explosive and arson investigations, and hair, paint and fiber evidence. Laboratory experiments will be performed to provide experience in using the methods discussed. Three-hour lecture. Four-hour laboratory.
Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: CHM 22 and 37
Spring 4 credits.

CHM 71 BASIC BIOCHEMISTRY
A one-semester introduction to the major concepts of biochemistry including carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory - Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 22 or 25.
Spring 4 credits.

COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT, SCHOOL OF PUBLIC SERVICE

CRJ 76 CRIMINAL PROCEDURE
Survey of the constitutional rights and safeguards of individuals from unlawful activities of investigative agencies. Rules of evidence and the protection of individual rights in the administration of criminal justice.
Prerequisites: none.
Fall 3 credits.

SCHOOL OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS AND NURSING

HSMB 71 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINALISTICS
The course includes an overview of forensic science laboratory techniques. The subject introduces the student to information collected and chain of custody followed at the crime scene; photography; physical evidence and its properties (trace evidence, fingerprints; firearms; fibers; paint; documents examination). This subject includes principles of microscopy; serology (blood identification procedures); origin determination; semen identification procedures; other biological substances of interest; hair comparison; drugs and toxicology; casework interpretation; quality control, proficiency testing and accreditation; and recent criminal cases. Lectures, demonstrations, and basic laboratory exercises are used to present the subject matter. One hour lecture. Four hour laboratory.
Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: none
Fall Semester 3 credits.

HSMB 255 TOXICOLOGY
This course covers the instrumental methods of assay. Toxicologic and pharmacologic action on and by the host organism are examined along with a review of major drug and toxin types. Special topics of interest are covered in the detection and identification of drugs in biological fluids. Three-hour lecture.
Prerequisites: CHM 22
Fall 3 credits.

HSMB 256 DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES IN MOLECULAR PATHOLOGY
Molecular diagnostics is the application of methods in biotechnology to assist in the diagnosis of disease at the cellular level. Biotechnology involves techniques used in molecular biology that are applied to the study of abnormal cells. Techniques used in biotechnology are: cell culture, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemistry, cloning and genetic probes. Formal lectures are followed by experiments in a laboratory equipped to perform some of the aforementioned techniques. Additionally, the use of the internet will be demonstrated as a means of accessing databases. Three hours lecture and five hours laboratory.
Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: HSMB 80
Spring 4 credits.

HSMB 257 FORENSIC MOLECULAR TECHNIQUES
This subject provides a detailed introduction to, and history of, forensic molecular techniques and applications, and covers relevant principles from genetics and biochemistry. This subject includes principles of forensic DNA profiling and repetitive DNA in the human genome; individualization versus identification; how genetic polymorphisms arise and are maintained; continuous versus discrete allele systems; DNA isolation methods; RFLP (Restriction fragment length polymorphism) analysis methods; short tandem repeat (STR) markers; PCR-based typing systems; automated systems and DNA databases; applications of mitochondrial DNA analysis; linkage, pedigree analysis, and reverse paternity; introductory applied statistics for forensic laboratories. Three hours lecture and five hours laboratory.
Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: HSMB 256
Fall 4 credits.

HSMB 271 FORENSIC SCIENCE INTERNSHIP
Independent laboratory and study (internship). A ten-week (30 hrs/week), full-time internship in a crime laboratory covering the following functions: document collection and examination, instrumental analysis, chemistry, toxicology, serology, crime scene review, special photography, explosive and incendiary device recovery, trace evidence collection, comparative microscopy in firearms and tool marks. This course is a 300-hour (30 per week) supervised practical experience.
Prerequisites: HSMB 71, 256 and CHM 39.
Fall, Spring, Summer: 2 credits

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Internships

A good internship can be an important first step toward building a network of industry contacts, and can lead to landing that all-important first job in forensic science. A 10-week full-time internship in a crime laboratory will provide priceless on-the-job experience working with forensic science professionals.

Internships will be arranged with area forensic science internship affiliates including placement in forensic, law and drug enforcement laboratories and related agencies.

In addition, students will be encouraged to join professional societies such as the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) and American College of Forensic Examiners Institute as student members.

*Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.33 (C+) in the major courses.

Admission Requirements

For admission to the C.W. Post Campus of Long Island University, students must have completed basic secondary school preparation: English (4 units); Social Studies (3 or more units); Mathematics (2 or more units with a pre-calculus course strongly recommended); Laboratory Sciences (2 or more units), Foreign Language (2 or more units); Electives (3 units) for a total of 16 units. They should complete a college application, submit official transcripts and complete Part I of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), and have a personal interview. Transfer students from two-year colleges can transfer up to a maximum of 72 credits if an associate degree was awarded. Articulation agreements exist between the local community colleges to facilitate transfer of earned academic credits.

Students who are either part-time or full-time can pursue the undergraduate degree program in forensic science. Students desiring to continue in the program must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.33 (C+) out of 4.00 in the major courses. All students at C.W. Post Campus, through the professional Academic Counselors, Director and Department Chairs are guided to complete courses in a timely way in order to complete degree requirements within a four-year cycle.

The admission process encourages enrollment from all persons interested in pursing education that will lead them to a career in forensic science. Since the tracking of students and advisement is on a semester basis, students are well informed regularly about the requirements they are expected to complete within the degree program.

Department Sponsors

The B.S. in Forensic Science is offered through the following academic disciplines:

* Department of Biomedical Sciences
  School of Health Professions and Nursing
  and the
* Department of Chemistry
  College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Why Choose C.W. Post?

Few colleges can match our individualized approach, nationally acclaimed career services, small class size, and magnificent campus setting.

The C.W. Post Campus, with 5,200 undergraduate students, is considered one of the most beautiful college campuses in America. Located on 307 wooded acres on Long Island’s beautiful North Shore, our private campus is only 50 minutes away from the excitement of New York City.

C.W. Post is the clear choice for so many different students because we offer a large and diverse selection of degree programs 108 to be exact, and over 1,000 courses. Our classes are small, averaging only 20 students, and are taught by renowned professors.

C.W. Post is home to a major university research library with 3 million volumes, and new facilities such as the Winnick Student Center and Pratt Recreation Center. Students have access to wireless Internet stations, more than 1,000 activities each year, varsity sporting events, and the world-renowned Tilles Center for the Performing Arts.

C.W. Post is one of six campuses of Long Island University, the seventh largest private university in America, which educates more than 27,000 students.

Scholarships

Every year, C.W. Post distributes more than $90 million in scholarships and financial aid. More than 85% of our students receive some form of aid to help meet college expenses. Our financial aid office will help you develop an aid package, combining, as appropriate, government aid programs, Long Island University scholarships, student earnings, loans, and other scholarships. For more information on financial aid, contact (516) 299-2338 or email finaid@cwpost.liu.edu or visit our web site at www.liu.edu/finaid.

Contact Us

Admissions Office
C.W. Post Campus
Long Island University
720 Northern Blvd.
Brookville, New York ll548-1130
Phone: (516) 299-2900
Fax: (516) 299-2137
Email: francis.harten@liu.edu
Web: www.liu.edu/cwpost
Apply Online: www.liu.edu/postapp
(see Freshmen or Transfer Application)
or
Program Director
Mr. Francis (Rusty) Harten
Phone: 516-299-3071
Fax: 516-299-3998

 
Long Island University C.W. Post Campus