Long Island University C.W. Post Campus
C.W. Post Campus B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library

What's New Archive 2013
Current Announcements


12/30 : Happy New Year!
From the Dean: Over the next few months, the Post Campus Library will be undergoing major changes that will impact the layout of the Library, the organization of some of the Library's material, and some of the Library's services. The long range goal is a simple one - to improve the user experience over time. This will be accomplished in part by:
  1. Aligning Library and related research services with the ways that users (students in particular) actually prefer to work.
  2. Expanding Library hours (this would be in addition to the recently expanded weekend hours).
  3. Making the Library a more inviting space for students to spend time, study alone or in groups, meet with their instructors, or just explore all the Library has to offer.
  4. Increasing the seating capacity within the Library in a way that is appealing and useful to students.
Please bear with us as these changes take place. If you have any questions, concerns, or need help with a library-related matter, please contact the Dean's Office at 516 299 2307.

The library will be closed Tuesday-Wednesday and open 9:00-5:00 on Thursday-Friday.

We will be open 9:00-4:00 on Saturday and closed Sunday. We will be open 9:00-8:00 the following week. The Bookmark Café will be closed until the spring semester.

On January 7, the Library Brown Bag series will present Dr. Nancy Marksbury to provide an introductory workshop on SPSS Statistics. This hands-on training session will feature instruction on using SPSS for research and will cover software basics including: entering data, simple charts, and data summaries. Those who plan to attend, as well as all other library faculty, are encouraged to take part in this survey created by Nancy. The survey is designed to generate data which will be manipulated by those who attend the session and is being compiled solely to serve as the statistical basis for the training session. Light refreshments will be served, but, in the spirit of a true brown bag, you should feel free to bring your lunch. It will run from 10:30-12:00 in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220). Please RSVP.

People off campus who are trying to use any of the databases from Ebsco, ProQuest, or Cabell's have been receiving the error message: "Please enter search terms" or "Search terms not recognized" after attempting a search. The problem pops up inconsistently but appears to mostly affect people using the Safari or Internet Explorer browsers. Information Technology is investigating the problem. In the meantime, you can try using Firefox, if possible, which does not seem to be experiencing this problem (available for both PC and MAC from www.getfirefox.com) or try using the databases from one of our other vendors. All of these databases work fine from computers on campus. We apologize for the inconvenience (more information).



12/26 : Library Maps and Hours
The maps of the library have been updated to reflect the remodeling that is currently taking place. If you're interested, you can review the previous remodeling that took place back in 2003.

The library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Thursday-Friday and closed Saturday-Sunday.

We will be open 9:00-5:00 on Monday and closed Tuesday-Wednesday. The Bookmark Café will be closed until the spring semester.

People off campus who are trying to use any of the databases from Ebsco, ProQuest, or Cabell's have been receiving the error message: "Please enter search terms" or "Search terms not recognized" after attempting a search. The problem pops up inconsistently but appears to mostly affect people using the Safari or Internet Explorer browsers. Information Technology is investigating the problem. In the meantime, you can try using Firefox, if possible, which does not seem to be experiencing this problem (available for both PC and MAC from www.getfirefox.com) or try using the databases from one of our other vendors. All of these databases work fine from computers on campus. We apologize for the inconvenience (more information).



12/22 : Holiday Hours
The library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Monday and closed Tuesday and Wednesday. We will be open 9:00-5:00 on Thursday and Friday. The Bookmark Café will be closed until the spring semester.

The schedule of Library Workshops for the spring semester has been posted.

People off campus who are trying to use any of the databases from Ebsco, ProQuest, or Cabell's have been receiving the error message: "Please enter search terms" or "Search terms not recognized" after attempting a search. The problem pops up inconsistently but appears to mostly affect people using the Safari or Internet Explorer browsers. Information Technology is investigating the problem. In the meantime, you can try using Firefox, if possible, which does not seem to be experiencing this problem (available for both PC and MAC from www.getfirefox.com) or try using the databases from one of our other vendors. All of these databases work fine from computers on campus. We apologize for the inconvenience (more information).



12/19 : Holiday Hours
The library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Friday, 9:00-4:00 on Saturday, 12:00-8:00 on Sunday, and 9:00-5:00 on Monday.

We will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday and open 9:00-5:00 the following Thursday and Friday. The Bookmark Café will be closed until the spring semester.

The schedule of Library Workshops for the spring semester has been posted.

People off campus who are trying to use any of the databases from Ebsco, ProQuest, or Cabell's have been receiving the error message: "Please enter search terms" or "Search terms not recognized" after attempting a search. The problem pops up inconsistently but appears to mostly affect people using the Safari or Internet Explorer browsers. Information Technology is investigating the problem. In the meantime, you can try using Firefox, if possible, which does not seem to be experiencing this problem (available for both PC and MAC from www.getfirefox.com) or try using the databases from one of our other vendors. All of these databases work fine from computers on campus. We apologize for the inconvenience (more information).



12/17 : Interlibrary Loan, Art Exhibit, Library Hours, and Database Problem
The Interlibrary Loan Office is moving to room 108 downstairs. On Wednesday, the ILLiad interlibrary loan server will be moved to its new location. It will be unavailable to take new requests or to check the status of active requests from approximately 9:30-11:30 in the morning. We apologize for the inconvenience.

The Copy Center in Reference Commons is being repurposed. The photocopy machines have been moved downstairs to the Periodicals Department.

Paintings by Diana Conklin are now on display in the hallway downstairs.

The library currently has extended hours for final exams. Reference Commons will be open until 1:00 on Tuesday and Wednesday. If you need someplace else to study when we are closed, Hillwood Commons stays open until midnight every day, and the Interfaith Center lounge will stay open all night (8:00pm-6:00am) from December 15-19. A PDF of the finals schedule is available on the campus website.

On Thursday, the library will close when the last exam in the building is finished. We will be open 9:00-5:00 on Friday, 9:00-4:00 on Saturday, and 12:00-8:00 on Sunday. The Bookmark Café will be closed until the spring semester.

A revised version of the holiday and wintersession hours has been posted.

People off campus who are trying to use any of the databases from Ebsco, ProQuest, or Cabell's have been receiving the error message: "Please enter search terms" or "Search terms not recognized" after attempting a search. The problem pops up inconsistently but appears to mostly affect people using the Safari or Internet Explorer browsers. Information Technology is investigating the problem. In the meantime, you can try using Firefox, if possible, which does not seem to be experiencing this problem (available for both PC and MAC from www.getfirefox.com) or try using the databases from one of our other vendors. All of these databases work fine from computers on campus. We apologize for the inconvenience (more information).



12/16 : Extended Hours, Holiday Hours, and Database Problem
The library currently has extended hours in preparation for the final exams that will begin on Friday. Reference Commons will be open until 1:00 on Mondays-Thursdays, until 9:00 on Fridays, and until 11:00 on Saturdays-Sundays. If you need someplace else to study when we are closed, Hillwood Commons stays open until midnight every day, and the Interfaith Center lounge will stay open all night (8:00pm-6:00am) from December 15-19. A PDF of the finals schedule is available on the campus website.

The Bookmark Café will be closed until the spring semester.

A revised version of the holiday and wintersession hours has been posted.

People off campus who are trying to use any of the databases from Ebsco, ProQuest, or Cabell's have been receiving the error message: "Please enter search terms" or "Search terms not recognized" after attempting a search. The problem pops up inconsistently but appears to mostly affect people using the Safari or Internet Explorer browsers. Information Technology is investigating the problem. In the meantime, you can try using Firefox, if possible, which does not seem to be experiencing this problem (available for both PC and MAC from www.getfirefox.com) or try using the databases from one of our other vendors. All of these databases work fine from computers on campus. We apologize for the inconvenience (more information).



12/11 : High-Tech Incubator, Extended Hours, and Database Problem
If you've been curious about what's been going on downstairs in the library, the University has issued this press release: LIU Spurs High-Tech Innovation and Entrepreneurship on Long Island in Collaboration with Canrock.

The library currently has extended hours in preparation for the final exams that will begin on Friday. Reference Commons will be open until 1:00 on Mondays-Thursdays, until 9:00 on Fridays, and until 11:00 on Saturdays-Sundays. If you need someplace else to study when we are closed, Hillwood Commons stays open until midnight every day, and the Interfaith Center lounge will stay open all night (8:00pm-6:00am) from December 15-19. A PDF of the finals schedule is available on the campus website.

People off campus who are trying to use any of the databases from Ebsco, ProQuest, or Cabell's have been receiving the error message: "Please enter search terms" or "Search terms not recognized" after attempting a search. The problem pops up inconsistently but appears to mostly affect people using the Safari or Internet Explorer browsers. Information Technology is investigating the problem. In the meantime, you can try using Firefox, if possible, which does not seem to be experiencing this problem (available for both PC and MAC from www.getfirefox.com) or try using the databases from one of our other vendors. All of these databases work fine from computers on campus. We apologize for the inconvenience (more information).



12/08 : Movie Posters, Islamic Art Lecture, Artists' Reception, Competency Exam, Database Problem, Extended Hours
'Tis the Season is the latest set of vintage movie posters that the Special Collections Department has placed on display in the upstairs hallway. These are only a few examples of the over 6,000 posters from 1940 through 1962 in the Original Movie Poster Research Collection. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.

On Monday will be Courtney Stewart's lecture, An Introduction to Islamic Art and Its Display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Ms. Stewart is an art historian at the Metropolitan Museum of Art who focuses on arts of the Islamic world. She is currently a Senior Research Assistant preparing an exhibition which will open in 2015, entitled "The Art of India's Deccan Sultans ca.1500-1750", which will focus on the Muslim sultanates in south-central India. Ms. Stewart has taught at the University of Toronto and enjoys sharing the impact of Islamic civilization made visible through material culture. Everyone is welcome to this free event the will begin at 6:30 in the Steinberg Museum of Art, Hillwood Commons. This lecture is a bonus in a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

On Tuesday will be the artists' reception for the new Art Exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery that features the paintings and mixed media work of Jennifer LaCava, Jill K. Hren, Jong rae Park, Rong Liu, Sofie Hoff, and Terri L. Hall. It will run from 5:00-8:00.

On Wednesday, the last Library Competency Exam of the semester will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. The Official College 101 Library Guide can be used to study for it. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

The library currently has extended hours in preparation for the final exams that will begin on December 13. Reference Commons will be open until 1:00 on Mondays-Thursdays, until 9:00 on Fridays, and until 11:00 on Saturdays-Sundays. If you need someplace else to study when we are closed, Hillwood Commons stays open until midnight every day, and the Interfaith Center lounge usually stays open all night once finals begin (more information about that once it has been officially announced). A PDF of the finals schedule is available on the campus website.

People off campus who are trying to use any of the databases from Ebsco, ProQuest, or Cabell's have been receiving the error message: "Please enter search terms" or "Search terms not recognized" after attempting a search. The problem pops up inconsistently but appears to mostly affect people using the Safari or Internet Explorer browsers. Information Technology is investigating the problem. In the meantime, you can try using Firefox, if possible, which does not seem to be experiencing this problem (available for both PC and MAC from www.getfirefox.com) or try using the databases from one of our other vendors. All of these databases work fine from computers on campus. We apologize for the inconvenience (more information).



12/04 : Extended Hours, Competency Exam, Islamic Art Lecture, Art Exhibit, Database Problem
The library currently has extended hours in preparation for the final exams that will begin on December 13. Reference Commons will be open until 1:00 on Mondays-Thursdays, until 9:00 on Fridays, and until 11:00 on Saturdays-Sundays. If you need someplace else to study when we are closed, Hillwood Commons stays open until midnight every day, and the Interfaith Center lounge usually stays open all night once finals begin (more information about that once it has been officially announced). A PDF of the finals schedule is available on the campus website.

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. The Official College 101 Library Guide can be used to study for it. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information). The last exam of the semester will be on Wednesday, December 11.

On Monday will be Courtney Stewart's lecture, An Introduction to Islamic Art and Its Display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Ms. Stewart is an art historian at the Metropolitan Museum of Art who focuses on arts of the Islamic world. She is currently a Senior Research Assistant preparing an exhibition which will open in 2015, entitled "The Art of India's Deccan Sultans ca.1500-1750", which will focus on the Muslim sultanates in south-central India. Ms. Stewart has taught at the University of Toronto and enjoys sharing the impact of Islamic civilization made visible through material culture. Everyone is welcome to this free event the will begin at 6:30 in the Steinberg Museum of Art, Hillwood Commons. This lecture is a bonus in a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

On Tuesday will be the artists' reception for the new Art Exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery that features the paintings and mixed media work of Jennifer LaCava, Jill K. Hren, Jong rae Park, Rong Liu, Sofie Hoff, and Terri L. Hall. It will run from 5:00-8:00.

People off campus who are trying to use any of the databases from Ebsco, ProQuest, or Cabell's have been receiving the error message: "Please enter search terms" or "Search terms not recognized" after attempting a search. The problem pops up inconsistently but appears to mostly affect people using the Safari or Internet Explorer browsers. Information Technology is investigating the problem. In the meantime, you can try using Firefox, if possible, which does not seem to be experiencing this problem (available for both PC and MAC from www.getfirefox.com) or try using the databases from one of our other vendors. All of these databases work fine from computers on campus. We apologize for the inconvenience (more information).



12/03 : Art Exhibit, Extended Hours, Competency Exam, and Database Problem
The new Art Exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery features the paintings and mixed media work of Jennifer LaCava, Jill K. Hren, Jong rae Park, Rong Liu, Sofie Hoff, and Terri L. Hall. The artists' reception will be on December 10th at 5:00.

On Wednesday, the library will begin extended hours in preparation for the final exams that will begin on December 13. Reference Commons will be open until 1:00 on Mondays-Thursdays, until 9:00 on Fridays, and until 11:00 on Saturdays-Sundays. If you need someplace else to study when we are closed, Hillwood Commons stays open until midnight every day, and the Interfaith Center lounge usually stays open all night once finals begin (more information about that once it has been officially announced). A PDF of the finals schedule is available on the campus website.

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. The Official College 101 Library Guide can be used to study for it. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information). The last exam of the semester will be on December 11.

People off campus who are trying to use any of the databases from Ebsco, ProQuest, or Cabell's have been receiving the error message: "Please enter search terms" or "Search terms not recognized" after attempting a search. The problem pops up inconsistently but appears to mostly affect people using the Safari or Internet Explorer browsers. Information Technology is investigating the problem. In the meantime, you can try using Firefox, if possible, which does not seem to be experiencing this problem (available for both PC and MAC from www.getfirefox.com) or try using the databases from one of our other vendors. All of these databases work fine from computers on campus. We apologize for the inconvenience (more information).



11/27 : Holiday Hours, New Database, Online Video, Pathfinders, Database Problem
In observance of Thanksgiving, the library will be closed Thursday-Friday. We will be open 12:00-5:00 on Saturday and 12:00-11:00 on Sunday.

Our newest database is the Complete Directory for People with Chronic Illness which provides an overview of the support services and information resources available for people eighty-eight chronic conditions. Each section contains a brief description of the condition followed by information about hotlines, websites, foundations, associations, publications, support groups, government agencies, and more.

The library subscribes to a number of collections of online streaming video. Art and Architecture Video includes documentaries and interviews that illustrate the history, theory, and practice of art, design, architecture, and other art forms. Silent Film Online contains features, serials, and shorts from the 1890s to the 1930s. New World Cinema: Independent Features & Shorts, 1990-Present offers over 250 award winning or nominated feature and short independent films. World Languages and Literature in Video presents biographies, documentaries, interviews, and dramatic adaptations covering the leading figures and literary traditions of world literature. Classical Music in Video provides performances of all forms of classical music, along with masterclasses and interviews with master teachers from around the world. And Opera in Video includes staged productions, interviews, classes, and documentaries that cover the full range of operatic composition from the Baroque to the 20th century. These are only six of the collections available from Alexander Street Press. Many of the videos have searchable transcripts that display alongside the video. Faculty can create annotated playlists, select clips, and link directly to them from their websites or online syllabi.

The pathfinders to library resources for Special Education and Autism and Asperger Syndrome have been updated. These are only two of the many Library Guides that can help you in getting started with your research.

On Wednesday, the library will begin extended hours in preparation for the final exams that will begin on December 13. Reference Commons will be open until 1:00 on Mondays-Thursdays, until 9:00 on Fridays, and until 11:00 on Saturdays-Sundays. If you need someplace else to study when we are closed, Hillwood Commons stays open until midnight every day, and the Interfaith Center lounge usually stays open all night once finals begin (more information about that once it has been officially announced). A PDF of the finals schedule is available on the campus website.

People off campus who are trying to use any of the databases from Ebsco or ProQuest have been receiving the error message: "Please enter search terms" after attempting a search. The problem pops up inconsistently but appears to mostly affect people using Safari or Internet Explorer. Ebsco has been made aware of this issue and has escalated it to their developers for troubleshooting. In the meantime, you can try using Firefox, if possible, which does not seem to be experiencing this problem (www.getfirefox.com) or try using the databases from one of our other vendors. We apologize for the inconvenience (more information).



11/25 : Database Problems and Holiday Hours
People off campus who are trying to use any of the databases from Ebsco or ProQuest have been receiving the error message: "Please enter search terms" after attempting a search. The problem pops up inconsistently but appears to mostly affect people using Safari or Internet Explorer. Ebsco has been made aware of this issue and has escalated it to their developers for troubleshooting. In the meantime, you can try using Firefox, if possible, which does not seem to be experiencing this problem (www.getfirefox.com) or try using the databases from one of our other vendors. We apologize for the inconvenience (more information).

On Tuesday evening, the full text of books from ebrary will not be available from approximately 8:00-10:00 due to scheduled maintenance.

In observance of Thanksgiving, the library will be open 8:00-5:00 on Wednesday and closed Thursday-Friday. We will be open 12:00-5:00 on Saturday and 12:00-11:00 on Sunday. The Bookmark Café will be closed Wednesday-Sunday.

Our newest technology trial is Browzine, a downloadable app that lets you create an intuitive newsstand of the library's top periodicals on your iPad, Android, or Kindle Fire tablet to easily browse journals by subject, discover new titles, monitor the key journals in your field, and read articles. BrowZine combines individual articles from the library's databases to create complete journals that you can arrange into a personal bookshelf to suit your preferences and delivers convenient push notifications to indicate when new material is published.



11/21 : Competency Exam, New Weekend Hours, App Trial, New Exhibit, Database Issues, Holiday Hours
Our newest technology trial is Browzine, a downloadable app that lets you create an intuitive newsstand of the library's top periodicals on your iPad, Android, or Kindle Fire tablet to easily browse journals by subject, discover new titles, monitor the key journals in your field, and read articles. BrowZine combines individual articles from the library's databases to create complete journals that you can arrange into a personal bookshelf to suit your preferences and delivers convenient push notifications to indicate when new material is published.

Starting last weekend, people off campus who are trying to use any of the databases from Ebsco have been receiving the error message: "Please enter search terms" after attempting a search. The problem pops up inconsistently but appears to mostly affect people using Safari or Internet Explorer. Ebsco has been made aware of this issue and has escalated it to their developers for troubleshooting. In the meantime, you can try using Firefox, if possible, which does not seem to be experiencing this problem or the databases from one of our other vendors. We apologize for the inconvenience.

The new exhibit in the back of Reference Commons showcases some of the items that are available in the Instructional Media Center (IMC) - "the multimedia resource center of the LIU Post Campus - which has more than 1,500 films, videos, interactive CD-ROMs, and a rich variety of other audiovisual resources. The IMC is equipped with a state of the art instructional lab for demonstrations, workshops, technology training, and media previews. Its exemplary collection of curriculum resources for K-12 (teacher resource materials, children's books and textbooks) supports the programs in the College of Education, Information and Technology. The IMC provides a variety of orientation and technology demonstrations for Education faculty and students, who are also encouraged to use the IMC media production facilities for preparing materials for their class presentations."

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. The Official College 101 Library Guide can be used to study for it. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

Starting on Friday, the library will increase its weekend hours. We will be open until 9:00 on Fridays and open until 11:00 on Saturdays and Sundays.

Looking ahead to next week, the library will be open 8:00-5:00 on Wednesday and closed Thursday-Friday.



11/20 : Booksale, Competency Exam, New Weekend Hours, Holiday Hours, Database Issues
The PLA Holiday Booksale will continue through Thursday on the lower level of the library. Items on sale will include DVDs, CDs, records, videos, and, of course, new, used, and collectable books.

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. The Official College 101 Library Guide can be used to study for it. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

Starting on Friday, the library will increase its weekend hours. We will be open until 9:00 on Fridays and open until 11:00 on Saturdays and Sundays.

Looking ahead to next week, the library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Wednesday and closed Thursday-Friday.

People using mobile devices off campus have reported some problems with accessing Ebsco databases on a Safari browser. Search terms not recognized. Ebscohost databases appear to function without incident on campus. Information Technology is investigating.

Cataloger's Desktop from the Library of Congress made some changes to its website that started causing problems with accessing it. It should be working now. The first time that you login, you will need to get a password from the Reference Desk (516-299-2305). You will then be asked to create your own account with your own password. Only thirty users may access this at one time, so please logout when you are finished.



11/18 : Booksale, New Hours, Citation Workshop, Competency Exam, Database Issues
The PLA Holiday Booksale will run from Tuesday through Thursday on the lower level of the library. Items on sale will include DVDs, CDs, records, videos, and, of course, new, used, and collectable books. On Tuesday, it will be open only to the LIU community and PLA members. On Wednesday and Thursday, it will be open to everybody.

People using mobile devices off campus have reported some problems with accessing Ebsco databases on a Safari browser. Search terms not recognized. Ebscohost databases appear to function without incident on campus. Information Technology is investigating.

Cataloger's Desktop from the Library of Congress made some changes to its website that started causing problems with accessing it. It should be working now. The first time that you login, you will need to get a password from the Reference Desk (516-299-2305). You will then be asked to create your own account with your own password. Only thirty users may access this at one time, so please logout when you are finished.

On Tuesday will be Pervasive Genetic Engineering and its Impact on Human Well-Being. "You are invited to an upcoming video conference call that is part of the United Nations Ambassador Series. The speaker is Ms. Nandhini Krishna, Head of the Genetics Section at the United Nations and she will be speaking on 'Pervasive Genetic Engineering and its Impact on Human Well-Being'. There is a presentation and then participating universities get to ask questions. Interested students can email amy.freedman@liu.edu or just show up." It will run from 12:00-1:30 upstairs in room LB381.

On Wednesday, in response to the many requests for help with citing sources using the APA, MLA, or Chicago citation styles, the library will be holding the second of two Styling Time! workshops in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220) at 12:30. Students are encouraged to bring their lists of sources to get hands-on help with citing them.

Also on Wednesday will be the rescheduled presentation, Gaming Careers: Do What You Love. "Always wanted to earn a living in the video game industry? Here's your chance to learn how. Sandbox Strategies is a boutique firm focused on media strategy for video games and consumer technology. It was founded in 2005 by three video game and consumer tech industry veterans, Bill Linn, Rob 'Pickle King' Fleischer, and Corey Wade. Prior to Sandbox, Rob worked at Rockstar Games for several years, and has worked on more than 300 titles from 'Tribes' to 'Army Men' to 'Grand Theft Auto' to 'Alan Wake'. Rob oversees the publicity efforts for Sandbox." It will run from 12:30-1:45 upstairs in room LB389.

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. The Official College 101 Library Guide can be used to study for it. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

Starting on Friday, the library will increase its weekend hours. We will be open until 9:00 on Fridays and open until 11:00 on Saturdays and Sundays.

The Special Collections Department has placed a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway that feature Movies to Watch for Thanksgiving. These are only a few examples of the over 6,000 posters from 1940 through 1962 in the Original Movie Poster Research Collection. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.



11/17 : New Hours, Database Fix, Posters, User-Driven Acquisitions, Citation Workshops, Booksale, Competency Exam
Starting on Friday, the library will increase its weekend hours. We will be open until 9:00 on Fridays and open until 11:00 on Saturdays and Sundays.

Cataloger's Desktop from the Library of Congress made some changes to its website that started causing problems with accessing it. It should be working now. The first time that you login, you will need to get a password from the Reference Desk (516-299-2305). You will then be asked to create your own account with your own password. Only thirty users may access this at one time, so please logout when you are finished.

The Special Collections Department has placed a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway that feature Movies to Watch for Thanksgiving. These are only a few examples of the over 6,000 posters from 1940 through 1962 in the Original Movie Poster Research Collection. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.

On Monday, the Library Brown Bag series will present User-Driven Acquisitions: A Report on LIU Libraries' PDA Pilot. Please join us for this program featuring an overview of Patron Driven Acquisitions (PDA), an ebook purchasing model that provides instant access to a vast pool of digital content while also reducing overall expenditure by only charging for actual use. Professor Kathleen Burlingame will explain how this model is changing the way libraries develop and manage their ebook collections in order to better meet the needs of researchers while also making budget spending more cost-effective. It will begin at 11:00 a.m. in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220). Light refreshments will be served, but in the spirit of a true brown bag you should feel free to bring your lunch. Please RSVP.

Also on Monday, in response to the many requests for help with citing sources using the APA, MLA, or Chicago citation styles, the library will be holding the first of two Styling Time! workshops in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220) at 12:30. Students are encouraged to bring their lists of sources to get hands-on help with citing them.

The PLA Holiday Booksale will run from Tuesday through Thursday on the lower level of the library. Items on sale will include DVDs, CDs, records, videos, and, of course, new, used, and collectable books. On Tuesday, it will be open only to the LIU community and PLA members. On Wednesday and Thursday, it will be open to everybody.

On Tuesday will be Pervasive Genetic Engineering and its Impact on Human Well-Being. "You are invited to an upcoming video conference call that is part of the United Nations Ambassador Series. The speaker is Ms. Nandhini Krishna, Head of the Genetics Section at the United Nations and she will be speaking on 'Pervasive Genetic Engineering and its Impact on Human Well-Being'. There is a presentation and then participating universities get to ask questions. Interested students can email amy.freedman@liu.edu or just show up." It will run from 12:00-1:30 upstairs in room LB381.

On Wednesday will be the second of two Styling Time! workshops in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220) at 12:30. Students are encouraged to bring their lists of sources to get hands-on help with citing them.

Also on Wednesday will be the rescheduled presentation, Gaming Careers: Do What You Love. "Always wanted to earn a living in the video game industry? Here's your chance to learn how. Sandbox Strategies is a boutique firm focused on media strategy for video games and consumer technology. It was founded in 2005 by three video game and consumer tech industry veterans, Bill Linn, Rob 'Pickle King' Fleischer, and Corey Wade. Prior to Sandbox, Rob worked at Rockstar Games for several years, and has worked on more than 300 titles from 'Tribes' to 'Army Men' to 'Grand Theft Auto' to 'Alan Wake'. Rob oversees the publicity efforts for Sandbox." It will run from 12:30-1:45 upstairs in room LB389.

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. The Official College 101 Library Guide can be used to study for it. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).



11/13 : User-Driven Acquisitions, Citation Workshops, Booksale, Library Competency Exam Study Guide
On Monday, the Library Brown Bag series will present User-Driven Acquisitions: A Report on LIU Libraries' PDA Pilot. Please join us for this program featuring an overview of Patron Driven Acquisitions (PDA), an ebook purchasing model that provides instant access to a vast pool of digital content while also reducing overall expenditure by only charging for actual use. Professor Kathleen Burlingame will explain how this model is changing the way libraries develop and manage their ebook collections in order to better meet the needs of researchers while also making budget spending more cost-effective. It will begin at 11:00 a.m. in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220). Light refreshments will be served, but in the spirit of a true brown bag you should feel free to bring your lunch. Please RSVP.

Also on Monday, in response to the many requests for help with citing sources using the APA, MLA, or Chicago citation styles, the library will be holding the first of two Styling Time! workshops in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220) at 12:30. Students are encouraged to bring their lists of sources to get hands-on help with citing them.

The PLA Holiday Booksale will run from Tuesday through Thursday on the lower level of the library. Items on sale will include DVDs, CDs, records, videos, and, of course, new, used, and collectable books. On Tuesday, it will be open only to the LIU community and PLA members. On Wednesday and Thursday, it will be open to everybody.

On Tuesday will be Pervasive Genetic Engineering and its Impact on Human Well-Being. "You are invited to an upcoming video conference call that is part of the United Nations Ambassador Series. The speaker is Ms. Nandhini Krishna, Head of the Genetics Section at the United Nations and she will be speaking on 'Pervasive Genetic Engineering and its Impact on Human Well-Being'. There is a presentation and then participating universities get to ask questions. Interested students can email amy.freedman@liu.edu or just show up." It will run from 12:00-1:30 upstairs in room LB381.

On Wednesday will be the second of two Styling Time! workshops in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220) at 12:30. Students are encouraged to bring their lists of sources to get hands-on help with citing them.

Also on Wednesday will be the rescheduled presentation, Gaming Careers: Do What You Love. "Always wanted to earn a living in the video game industry? Here's your chance to learn how. Sandbox Strategies is a boutique firm focused on media strategy for video games and consumer technology. It was founded in 2005 by three video game and consumer tech industry veterans, Bill Linn, Rob 'Pickle King' Fleischer, and Corey Wade. Prior to Sandbox, Rob worked at Rockstar Games for several years, and has worked on more than 300 titles from 'Tribes' to 'Army Men' to 'Grand Theft Auto' to 'Alan Wake'. Rob oversees the publicity efforts for Sandbox." It will run from 12:30-1:45 upstairs in room LB389.

The Official College 101 Library Guide is now available. It provides information and videos for students taking the College 101 course or the Library Workshop, as well as those who wish to prepare for the Library Competency Exam or who just wish to know more about using the library. It replaces the Library Workshop Manual that had been on our website.



11/11 : Online Library Guide, Minaret Booktalk, Competency Exam, Islam & Peace Lecture, More
The Official College 101 Library Guide is now available. It provides information and videos for students taking the College 101 course or the Library Workshop, as well as those who wish to prepare for the Library Competency Exam or who just wish to know more about using the library. It replaces the Library Workshop Manual that had been on our website.

On Tuesday, Dr. Margaret Hallissy will lead a book discussion based on Minaret by Leila Aboulela. "Leila Aboulela's American debut is a provocative, timely, and engaging novel about a young Muslim woman - once privileged and secular in her native Sudan and now impoverished in London - gradually embracing her orthodox faith. With her Muslim hijab and down-turned gaze, Najwa is invisible to most eyes, especially to the rich families whose houses she cleans in London. After a coup forces her wealthy family to flee Khartoum, Najwa eventually finds solace and love in the Muslim community of her adopted country." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 1:00-2:30 in the Hillwood Commons Pioneer Room, but registration is required. Please call 516-299-2895 to reserve your place.

On Wednesday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. The Official College 101 Library Guide can be used as a study guide. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

Also on Wednesday will be Daisy Khan's lecture/presentation, Islamic Traditions of Peace and Nonviolence: Responding to Contemporary Challenges. "Daisy Khan is Executive Director of the American Society for Muslim Advancement (ASMA), a New York-based non-profit dedicated to strengthening an expression of Islam based on cultural and religious harmony and building bridges between Muslims and the general public. At ASMA, she has led numerous interfaith events like the theater production 'Same Difference' and the 'Cordoba Bread Fest' banquet. Daisy Khan is now focusing on the role of women and youth in tackling international challenges, particularly in the wake of 9/11. She is the founder of two cutting-edge international Muslim networks comprised of scholars, activists, and community leaders: the Women's Islamic Initiative in Spirituality and Equality (WISE) and the Muslim Leaders of Tomorrow (MLT), movements of women and youth, respectively. At the forefront of American and global discussions on Islam, Ms. Khan is an American Muslim woman helping create a counter momentum to extremism by shaping the discourse on Islam in America and around the globe. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Interfaith Center's Award for Promoting Peace and Interfaith Understanding, Auburn Seminary's Lives of Commitment Award, the Annual Faith Leaders Award, and 21 Leaders for the 21st Century." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the Hillwood Lecture Hall. It will be preceded by a reception at 6:00 in the Steinberg Museum of Art which is also in Hillwood Commons.

These are the last events in a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

On Monday, the Library Brown Bag series will present User-Driven Acquisitions: A Report on LIU Libraries' PDA Pilot. Please join us for this program featuring an overview of Patron Driven Acquisitions (PDA), an ebook purchasing model that provides instant access to a vast pool of digital content while also reducing overall expenditure by only charging for actual use. Professor Kathleen Burlingame will explain how this model is changing the way libraries develop and manage their ebook collections in order to better meet the needs of researchers while also making budget spending more cost-effective. It will begin at 11:00 a.m. in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220). Light refreshments will be served, but in the spirit of a true brown bag you should feel free to bring your lunch. Please RSVP.

Also on Monday, in response to the many requests for help with citing sources using the APA, MLA, or Chicago citation styles, the library will be holding the first of two Styling Time! workshops in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220) at 12:30. Students are encouraged to bring their lists of sources to get hands-on help with citing them.

The PLA Holiday Booksale will run from November 19-21.



11/07 : Shirley Temple Concert, Online Video, Research Methods, Holiday Hours, Competency Exam, Muslim Journeys, More
Some of our new streaming video collections are: Education in Video, with lectures, documentaries, teaching demonstrations, and primary-source footage of students and teachers in actual classrooms - Alexander Street Counseling, with training videos, reenactments, conferences, seminars, workshops, and footage of actual therapy sessions conducted by renowned counselors, psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers to provide a firsthand look at the realities of working with clients - Psychology Video Online, with documentaries, interviews, case studies, and experiments across many topics - Health and Society in Video, which defines and explores health and wellness issues and their impact on society with hundreds of premium documentaries, profiles, reports, and interviews - and Science Video Online, which covers environmental studies, natural history, physical sciences, and biological sciences, including coverage of chemistry, physics, biology, geology, oceanography, ecology, astronomy, and geography. These are just five of the collections available through our new database, Alexander Street Video.

A new database available for a brief trial period is Sage Research Methods, which provides information on the process of creating a research study - including the literature search, literature review, research design, methodology concepts, data collection, data analysis, writing up the results, and more. Focusing on methodology rather than disciplines, it can be used across the sciences and social sciences to help researchers explore methods concepts, understand particular methods, or identify a new method.

Choice Reviews Online, which covers significant books and electronic resources that are of interest to those in higher education, has been given a new user interface and a new web address. The old version of the site will close on November 27, 2013. Saved searches, saved lists, user names, and passwords cannot be transferred to the new version. If you have saved lists on the old version, please e-mail yourself any lists that you would like to retain.

Earlier this week, there was a problem with access to the Children's Literature Comprehensive Database. It's feeling better now.

On Friday will be the participatory workshop, Using Objective Tests in Outcomes Assessment, that will examine "how objective tests, test blueprints/specifications tables, and analysis of test items and test data can inform programmatic Outcomes Assessment. Light refreshments will be served. Register by sending an email to: LIU-Assessment@liu.edu. In the email's subject line, please indicate LIU Post Workshop." It will run from 10:00-12:00 upstairs in room LB386.

On Friday, the Post Library Association will present Gary Haberman and Patti Dunham in a performance of Dimples: The Music of Shirley Temple. "Shirley Temple was and in many ways still is, 'America's Sweetheart'. Many young stars have come and gone, but she has left her imprint upon the world. She made the country feel good during the hard recovery years following the Great Depression. This program contains a list of unique selections from the Shirley Temple repertoire. The young star performed some of these melodies at just 4 years of age. Trademark songs such as 'The Good Ship Lollipop' and 'Animal Crackers in my Soup' will be performed along with lesser-known musical numbers. The best composers and lyricists in Hollywood created these songs. This collection is a retrospective of her fabulous songs and movies from the 1930's. The program takes a nostalgic look back with the audience by revisiting some of the music they may not remember. It recaptures childhood memories, flashbacks of the movies, the career of the young star and one's own personal experience with Shirley Temple." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will begin at 8:00pm downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery.

On Monday, in observance of Veterans Day, the library will be open 9:00-5:00.

On Tuesday, Dr. Margaret Hallissy will lead a book discussion based on Minaret by Leila Aboulela. "Leila Aboulela's American debut is a provocative, timely, and engaging novel about a young Muslim woman - once privileged and secular in her native Sudan and now impoverished in London - gradually embracing her orthodox faith. With her Muslim hijab and down-turned gaze, Najwa is invisible to most eyes, especially to the rich families whose houses she cleans in London. After a coup forces her wealthy family to flee Khartoum, Najwa eventually finds solace and love in the Muslim community of her adopted country." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 1:00-2:30 in the Hillwood Commons Pioneer Room, but registration is required. Please call 516-299-2895 to reserve your place.

On Wednesday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

Also on Wednesday will be Daisy Khan's lecture/presentation, Islamic Traditions of Peace and Nonviolence: Responding to Contemporary Challenges. "Daisy Khan is Executive Director of the American Society for Muslim Advancement (ASMA), a New York-based non-profit dedicated to strengthening an expression of Islam based on cultural and religious harmony and building bridges between Muslims and the general public. At ASMA, she has led numerous interfaith events like the theater production 'Same Difference' and the 'Cordoba Bread Fest' banquet. Daisy Khan is now focusing on the role of women and youth in tackling international challenges, particularly in the wake of 9/11. She is the founder of two cutting-edge international Muslim networks comprised of scholars, activists, and community leaders: the Women's Islamic Initiative in Spirituality and Equality (WISE) and the Muslim Leaders of Tomorrow (MLT), movements of women and youth, respectively. At the forefront of American and global discussions on Islam, Ms. Khan is an American Muslim woman helping create a counter momentum to extremism by shaping the discourse on Islam in America and around the globe. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Interfaith Center's Award for Promoting Peace and Interfaith Understanding, Auburn Seminary's Lives of Commitment Award, the Annual Faith Leaders Award, and 21 Leaders for the 21st Century." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the Hillwood Lecture Hall. It will be preceded by a reception at 6:00 in the Steinberg Museum of Art which is also in Hillwood Commons.

These are the last events in a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.



11/04 : Psychology Database, Art Exhibit & Reception, Movie Posters, Booktalk, Education Conference, Concert
Our newest database is the DSM-V: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition, which is used by health professionals, social workers, legal specialists, and researchers to diagnose and classify mental disorders. The descriptions of criteria are concise and explicit, intended to facilitate an objective assessment of symptom presentations in a variety of clinical settings: inpatient, outpatient, partial hospital, consultation-liaison, clinical, private practice, and primary care. The fifth edition is the product of more than ten years of effort by hundreds of international experts in all aspects of mental health. (The fourth edition is also available).

The new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery is Blood, Sweat, and Tears, featuring work from the artists of Artspace Patchogue: Sonia Vera-Leon, Lisa Di Stefano, Courtney Pure, Aleta Cortes, Nikki Greenhalgh, Dana Flaherty, Ed Robinson, Rich Belsky, Lucille Juliano, Linda Abadjian, and Dave Rogers. The artists' reception will be on Wednesday from 5:00-8:00 p.m.

The Special Collections Department has placed a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway that feature Veterans Day Movies. These are only a few examples of the over 6,000 posters from 1940 through 1962 in the Original Movie Poster Research Collection. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.

On Tuesday, Dr. Margaret Hallissy will lead a book discussion based on Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood by Fatima Mernissi. "Fatima Mernissi tells her memories of growing up in urban Morocco with stories of the women who surrounded her in the courtyard of her youth - her mother, aunts and cousins. Living in a domestic harem and deprived of access to the world outside, these women used their imagination to recreate their own place ... a provocative story of a girl confronting the mysteries of time and place, gender and sex in the recent Muslim world." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 10:30-12:00 in the Hillwood Commons Pioneer Room, but registration is required. Please call 516-299-2895 to reserve your place.

On Thursday will be an All Day Education Conference on Issues Related to Muslim Youth. Panels and discussions will include: Prejudice Reduction Workshop on Integrating Muslim Students in Schools - Creating Cultural Sensitivity about South Asia through the Arts (featuring Fatima Sultan, whose work with SAALY can be seen in the library's current exhibit) - Mummy am I a... (book discussion) - This is Where I Need to Be: Oral Histories of Muslim Youth in NYC - Hate Crimes and Harassment in Schools and Communities are on the Rise: Educators Offer Practical Solutions Against Rising Bullying of South Asian American Youth. Everyone is welcome to these free events that will run from 9:00-5:00 in the Tilles Center Atrium and Patrons Room.

These events are part of a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

Also on Thursday will be the presentation, Do What You Love. Work in Gaming. "Always wanted to earn a living in the video game industry? Hereís your chance to learn how. Sandbox Strategies is a boutique firm focused on media strategy for video games and consumer technology. It was founded in 2005 by three video game and consumer tech industry veterans, Bill Linn, Rob 'Pickle King' Fleischer, and Corey Wade. Prior to Sandbox, Rob worked at Rockstar Games for several years, and has worked on more than 300 titles from Tribes to Army Men to Grand Theft Auto to Alan Wake. Rob oversees the publicity efforts for Sandbox." It will run from 12:30-1:45 upstairs in room LB389.

On Friday will be the participatory workshop, Using Objective Tests in Outcomes Assessment, that will examine "how objective tests, test blueprints/specifications tables, and analysis of test items and test data can inform programmatic Outcomes Assessment. Light refreshments will be served. Register by sending an email to: LIU-Assessment@liu.edu. In the email's subject line, please indicate LIU Post Workshop." It will run from 10:00-12:00 upstairs in room LB386.

On Friday, the Post Library Association will present Gary Haberman and Patti Dunham in a performance of Dimples: The Music of Shirley Temple. "Shirley Temple was and in many ways still is, 'America's Sweetheart'. Many young stars have come and gone, but she has left her imprint upon the world. She made the country feel good during the hard recovery years following the Great Depression. This program contains a list of unique selections from the Shirley Temple repertoire. The young star performed some of these melodies at just 4 years of age. Trademark songs such as 'The Good Ship Lollipop' and 'Animal Crackers in my Soup' will be performed along with lesser-known musical numbers. The best composers and lyricists in Hollywood created these songs. This collection is a retrospective of her fabulous songs and movies from the 1930's. The program takes a nostalgic look back with the audience by revisiting some of the music they may not remember. It recaptures childhood memories, flashbacks of the movies, the career of the young star and one's own personal experience with Shirley Temple." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will begin at 8:00pm downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery.

On Monday, in observance of Veterans Day, the library will be open 9:00-5:00.



10/31 : Online Video, Library Competency Exam, Voice Thread Demo, Muslim Journeys Booktalk & Conference, Concert
Ethnographic Video Online provides anthropologists, sociologists, and cultural historians with an expansive and multifaceted survey of human culture and behavior the world over. It covers anthropology, history, politics, religion, linguistics, geography, economics, area studies, psychology, environmental studies, and more. Researchers can identify and compare materials by theme, cultural group, geographic location, ethnographer, content type, and anthropological subject. VAST: Academic Video Online provides access to thousands of award-winning films, interviews, commercials, performances, news programs, field recordings, and more from dozens of producers and distributors including PBS, the BBC, and many more. It covers a wide range of disciplines, such as: art, law, opera, dance, health, history, theatre, politics, science, therapy, religion, business, literature, education, languages, economics, counseling, philosophy, humanities, psychology, area studies, architecture, public safety, anthropology, ethnic studies, LGBT studies, criminal justice, women's studies, political science, and more. These are just two of the collections available through our new database, Alexander Street Video.

On Monday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

On Monday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, Voice Thread. "Voice Thread software enables group conversations and comments to be collected and shared in one place from anywhere in the world. Voice Thread is a Web 2.0 collaborative multimedia slide show that holds images, documents, and videos. Teachers can share their Voice Threads with students, and students can interact and leave their comments using voice, text, or video (via a webcam). Students can also doodle and take on multiple identities." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Tuesday, Dr. Margaret Hallissy will lead a book discussion based on Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood by Fatima Mernissi. "Fatima Mernissi tells her memories of growing up in urban Morocco with stories of the women who surrounded her in the courtyard of her youth - her mother, aunts and cousins. Living in a domestic harem and deprived of access to the world outside, these women used their imagination to recreate their own place ... a provocative story of a girl confronting the mysteries of time and place, gender and sex in the recent Muslim world." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 10:30-12:00 in the Hillwood Commons Pioneer Room, but registration is required. Please call 516-299-2895 to reserve your place.

On Thursday will be an All Day Education Conference on Issues Related to Muslim Youth. Panels and discussions will include: Prejudice Reduction Workshop on Integrating Muslim Students in Schools - Creating Cultural Sensitivity about South Asia through the Arts (featuring Fatima Sultan, whose work with SAALY can be seen in the library's current exhibit) - Mummy am I a... (book discussion) - This is Where I Need to Be: Oral Histories of Muslim Youth in NYC - Hate Crimes and Harassment in Schools and Communities are on the Rise: Educators Offer Practical Solutions Against Rising Bullying of South Asian American Youth. Everyone is welcome to these free events that will run from 9:00-5:00 in the Tilles Center Atrium and Patrons Room.

These events are part of a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

Also on Thursday will be the presentation, Do What You Love. Work in Gaming. "Always wanted to earn a living in the video game industry? Hereís your chance to learn how. Sandbox Strategies is a boutique firm focused on media strategy for video games and consumer technology. It was founded in 2005 by three video game and consumer tech industry veterans, Bill Linn, Rob 'Pickle King' Fleischer, and Corey Wade. Prior to Sandbox, Rob worked at Rockstar Games for several years, and has worked on more than 300 titles from Tribes to Army Men to Grand Theft Auto to Alan Wake. Rob oversees the publicity efforts for Sandbox." It will run from 12:30-1:45 upstairs in room LB389.

On November 8, the Post Library Association will present Gary Haberman and Patti Dunham in a performance of Dimples: The Music of Shirley Temple. "Shirley Temple was and in many ways still is, 'America's Sweetheart'. Many young stars have come and gone, but she has left her imprint upon the world. She made the country feel good during the hard recovery years following the Great Depression. This program contains a list of unique selections from the Shirley Temple repertoire. The young star performed some of these melodies at just 4 years of age. Trademark songs such as 'The Good Ship Lollipop' and 'Animal Crackers in my Soup' will be performed along with lesser-known musical numbers. The best composers and lyricists in Hollywood created these songs. This collection is a retrospective of her fabulous songs and movies from the 1930's. The program takes a nostalgic look back with the audience by revisiting some of the music they may not remember. It recaptures childhood memories, flashbacks of the movies, the career of the young star and one's own personal experience with Shirley Temple." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will begin at 8:00pm downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery.



10/29 : Britannica School, Citation Style, Movie Posters, Library Workshops, Booktalk, Art Lecture, Educational Technology, More
Our newest database is Britannica School from the Encyclopaedia Britannica. Written, edited, reviewed, and updated regularly by the world's leading content experts, it is divided into three user-friendly interfaces - Elementary, Middle, and High - to provide information aligned to the Common Core and state standards that is appropriate to each student's reading, grade, and age level. The Lesson Plan Builder helps create interactive activities for small and large groups, and thousands of new articles, images, and multimedia elements are added every quarter.

In response to the many requests for help with citing sources using the APA, MLA, or Chicago citation styles, the library will be holding two Styling Time! workshops later in November. Students are encouraged to bring their lists of sources to get hands-on help with citing them.

Keeping with the Halloween theme, the Special Collections Department has placed a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway that feature Halloween Thrillers. These are only a few examples of the over 6,000 posters from 1940 through 1962 in the Original Movie Poster Research Collection. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.

Ebsco has made some modifications to the user interface for searching their databases.

Section 4 of the Library Workshop will begin on Wednesday at 3:30. Section 5 will begin on Thursday at 12:30. Both sections will meet in the Library Instruction lab (LB220).

On Wednesday will be a roundtable discussion on Making Assessment Transformative. "Come join us in sharing Outcomes Assessment experiences. We will be discussing various facets of assessment including best practices, action research and faculty involvement. Lunch will be served." It will run from 12:30-2:00 upstairs in room LB386. Please register at: LIU-Assessment@liu.edu. In the subject line please indicate Post Roundtable.

On Thursday, Dr. Margaret Hallissy will lead a book discussion based on Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi. "Wise, funny, and heartbreaking, Satrapi's acclaimed graphic tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah's regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran and of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life. Marjane's child's-eye view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 10:30-12:00 in the Hillwood Commons Pioneer Room, but registration is required. Please call 516-299-2895 to reserve your place.

On Thursday will be Dr. Anne Burns' lecture, Geometry and the Art of Islam. "The study of Islamic Art is ideal for a unified interdisciplinary experience in art and mathematics. It can lead to a greater understanding of artistic and cultural concepts. Islamic Art relies heavily on key concepts in mathematics: geometry, symmetry and pattern. Patterns that appear to be complex and intricate can be analyzed to identify a fundamental unit that can be rotated, reflected and translated. Students learn the underlying geometric framework and create their own patterns using Geometer's Sketchpad, the modern equivalent of a compass and straightedge. An exhibit in the library features geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns. The course analyzed the geometric principles present in examples of Islamic Art and then used those principles to create their own patterns." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 12:30-1:45 in the Top of the Commons at Hillwood Commons.

Also on Thursday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, Technology for Special Needs. "This workshop will focus primarily on free assistive technologies that are available for special needs students in K-12. Included will be demonstrations of text-to-speech (TTS) software, voice recognition programs, word prediction software, and communication boards. Microsoft Office accessibility features that make it easier for students with disabilities to use the computer will also be covered." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Monday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

On Monday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, Voice Thread. "Voice Thread software enables group conversations and comments to be collected and shared in one place from anywhere in the world. Voice Thread is a Web 2.0 collaborative multimedia slide show that holds images, documents, and videos. Teachers can share their Voice Threads with students, and students can interact and leave their comments using voice, text, or video (via a webcam). Students can also doodle and take on multiple identities." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Tuesday, Dr. Margaret Hallissy will lead a book discussion based on Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood by Fatima Mernissi. "Fatima Mernissi tells her memories of growing up in urban Morocco with stories of the women who surrounded her in the courtyard of her youth - her mother, aunts and cousins. Living in a domestic harem and deprived of access to the world outside, these women used their imagination to recreate their own place ... a provocative story of a girl confronting the mysteries of time and place, gender and sex in the recent Muslim world." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 10:30-12:00 in the Hillwood Commons Pioneer Room, but registration is required. Please call 516-299-2895 to reserve your place.

These events are part of a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

The list of collections available through our new database, Alexander Street Video, has been added to our vendor list. From early twentieth-century newsreels to just-released documentaries and performances, this database provides access to over 17,000 films, interviews, commercials, performances, news programs, field recordings, and more that are indexed for subjects, people, places, release date, language, publisher, and video type. Many of the videos have searchable transcripts that display alongside the video. Faculty can create annotated playlists, select clips, and link directly to them from their websites or online syllabi. Subject areas include: American history - area studies - art & architecture - black studies - business & economics - classical music - counseling & therapy - criminal justice & public safety - current affairs - dance - education - ethnic studies - ethnography - film studies - gay & lesbian studies - health - humanities - nursing - opera - psychology - rehabilitation therapy - religion & philosophy - science - sports medicine & exercise science - theatre - women's & gender studies - world history - and world language & literature.



10/24 : Online Video, Competency Exam, Ed Tech Workshops, Library Workshops, Muslim Journeys Lectures & Booktalk
The list of collections available through our newest database, Alexander Street Video, has been added to our vendor list. From early twentieth-century newsreels to just-released documentaries and performances, this database provides access to over 17,000 films, interviews, commercials, performances, news programs, field recordings, and more that are indexed for subjects, people, places, release date, language, publisher, and video type. Many of the videos have searchable transcripts that display alongside the video. Faculty can create annotated playlists, select clips, and link directly to them from their websites or online syllabi. Subject areas include: American history - area studies - art & architecture - black studies - business & economics - classical music - counseling & therapy - criminal justice & public safety - current affairs - dance - education - ethnic studies - ethnography - film studies - gay & lesbian studies - health - humanities - nursing - opera - psychology - rehabilitation therapy - religion & philosophy - science - sports medicine & exercise science - theatre - women's & gender studies - world history - and world language & literature.

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

On Saturday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the Phi Delta Kappa Chapter 1524 at LIU Post, will present the hands-on technology workshop for students and teachers, Mapping Media to the Common Core. "Move forward on the road to digital literacy by integrating common core standards, flipping the classroom, and using interactive technology tools strategically and skillfully." It will run from 10:00am-1:00pm downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P to pdkeventcoordinator@gmail.com before October 24.

Section 3 of the Library Workshop will begin on Tuesday at 9:30am. Section 4 will begin on Wednesday at 3:30. And Section 5 will begin on Thursday at 12:30. All three sections will meet in the Library Instruction lab (LB220).

On Tuesday will be Dr. Philip Harwood's lecture, The Muslim's Place In Film Through The Years. "Throughout the history of film, either Hollywood or international, filmmakers presented their view of the Muslim people. Professor Harwood presents a cinematic study of such films as Gunga Din, Lawrence of Arabia, The Man Who Would Be King, The Wind and the Lion, Not Without My Daughter, and other films, with a focus on the depiction of the Muslim people on film." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 12:30-1:45 in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall.

On Wednesday will be a roundtable discussion on Making Assessment Transformative. "Come join us in sharing Outcomes Assessment experiences. We will be discussing various facets of assessment including best practices, action research and faculty involvement. Lunch will be served." It will run from 12:30-2:00 upstairs in room LB386. Please register at: LIU-Assessment@liu.edu. In the subject line please indicate Post Roundtable.

On Thursday, Dr. Margaret Hallissy will lead a book discussion based on Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi. "Wise, funny, and heartbreaking, Satrapi's acclaimed graphic tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah's regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran and of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life. Marjane's child's-eye view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 10:30-12:00 in the Hillwood Commons Pioneer Room, but registration is required. Please call 516-299-2895 to reserve your place.

On Thursday will be Dr. Anne Burns' lecture, Geometry and the Art of Islam. "The study of Islamic Art is ideal for a unified interdisciplinary experience in art and mathematics. It can lead to a greater understanding of artistic and cultural concepts. Islamic Art relies heavily on key concepts in mathematics: geometry, symmetry and pattern. Patterns that appear to be complex and intricate can be analyzed to identify a fundamental unit that can be rotated, reflected and translated. Students learn the underlying geometric framework and create their own patterns using Geometer's Sketchpad, the modern equivalent of a compass and straightedge. An exhibit in the library features geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns. The course analyzed the geometric principles present in examples of Islamic Art and then used those principles to create their own patterns." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 12:30-1:45 in the Top of the Commons at Hillwood Commons.

These events are part of a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

Also on Thursday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, Technology for Special Needs. "This workshop will focus primarily on free assistive technologies that are available for special needs students in K-12. Included will be demonstrations of text-to-speech (TTS) software, voice recognition programs, word prediction software, and communication boards. Microsoft Office accessibility features that make it easier for students with disabilities to use the computer will also be covered." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.



10/22 : Online Video, Educational Technology Workshops, Booktalk, Using Scopus, Competency Exam
Our newest database is Alexander Street Video. From early twentieth-century newsreels to just-released documentaries and performances, this database provides access to over 17,000 films, interviews, commercials, performances, news programs, field recordings, and more that are indexed for subjects, people, places, release date, language, publisher, and video type. Many of the videos have searchable transcripts that display alongside the video. Faculty can create annotated playlists, select clips, and link directly to them from their websites or online syllabi. Subject areas include: American history - area studies - art & architecture - black studies - business & economics - classical music - counseling & therapy - criminal justice & public safety - current affairs - dance - education - ethnic studies - ethnography - film studies - gay & lesbian studies - health - humanities - nursing - opera - psychology - rehabilitation therapy - religion & philosophy - science - sports medicine & exercise science - theatre - women's & gender studies - world history - and world language & literature.

The SPSS Statistics software is now available on all the computers in Reference Commons and the Library Instruction Lab.

On Wednesday, Exploring Careers & Choosing a Major will be discussed upstairs in room LB384 from 12:30-1:30. "Are you exploring majors, but still uncertain of the right direction? Thinking of switching majors? Join us for a lively discussion on the common myths and realities that often shape students' decisions when choosing a major. Come and gain valuable tips on how to make good choices about majors, minors, and careers. For more information, please call Staci Siegel at 516-299-2582 or email at staci.siegel@liu.edu"

On Wednesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, Digital Storytelling. "Digital Storytelling is an extension of traditional storytelling that can be innovatively used by teachers across the K-12 curriculum for individual or collaborative projects and assignments. Using a variety of media, such as photos, video, animation, sound, and narration, students can create stories that are educational or imaginative and fun. The workshop will include a demonstration of select storytelling tools and hands-on experience." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Wednesday, there will be a blood drive from 8:30am-8:30pm in the Hillwood Pioneer Room. Please donate if you can. For more information, call 516-299-2800.

On Thursday, Dr. Margaret Hallissy will lead a book discussion based on How Does It Feel to Be a Problem? Being Young and Arab in America by Moustafa Bayoumi. "Just over a century ago, W.E.B. Du Bois posed a probing question in his classic The Souls of Black Folk: 'How does it feel to be a problem?' Now, Moustafa Bayoumi asks the same about America's new 'problem': Arab- and Muslim-Americans. Bayoumi takes readers into the lives of seven twenty-something's living in Brooklyn, home to the largest Arab-American population in the United States." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 10:30-12:00 in the Hillwood Commons Pioneer Room, but registration is required. Please call 516-299-2895 to reserve your place.

These events are part of a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

On Thursday, Selenay Aytac and Robert Battenfeld will present a library brown-bag workshop on Using Scopus: Creating Publication and Subject Alerts. "Are you interested in learning how to create publication and subject alerts in Scopus? If so please join us for a hands-on training session featuring instruction on how to create publication and subject alerts that will automatically email you when an author's publication, keywords, affiliations or other search criteria appear in the Scopus database. You will be able to connect to the citation, download the citation, and full text (when available) from the alert of Scopus. Scopus is the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed research literature. It includes over 19,000 titles from more than 5,000 international publishers and offers researchers a quick, easy and comprehensive resource to support their research needs in the scientific, technical, and medical and social sciences fields as well as the arts and humanities disciplines. For more information on this database please consult our Library Guide. During the training session you will learn the most effective ways to create publication and subject alerts in this database. It will begin at 12:30 in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220). Light refreshments will be served, but in the spirit of a true brown bag please feel free to bring your lunch. Please RSVP using this form. Questions? Comments? Contact Selenay.Aytac@liu.edu or Robert.Battenfeld@liu.edu."

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

On Saturday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the Phi Delta Kappa Chapter 1524 at LIU Post, will present the hands-on technology workshop for students and teachers, Mapping Media to the Common Core. "Move forward on the road to digital literacy by integrating common core standards, flipping the classroom, and using interactive technology tools strategically and skillfully." It will run from 10:00am-1:00pm downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P to pdkeventcoordinator@gmail.com before October 24.

On Tuesday, section 3 of the Library Workshop will begin at 9:30am in the Library Instruction lab (LB220).



10/17 : Corporate Affiliations, Sexuality & Islam Lecture, Digital Storytelling, Booktalk, Using Scopus
Our newest database is LexisNexis Corporate Affiliations. It provides company profiles and in-depth details on directors, executives, and their professional interactions. It includes: all publicly traded US companies on the three major exchanges and significant companies on the smaller exchanges; privately held US companies with over $1 million in revenues or over 300 employees; and public and private international parents of US companies and international companies with over $10 million in revenues or over 300 employees. Company information includes: year founded, address, telephone, fax, email, website, business description, financials, stock exchanges, NAICS classifications, SIC classifications, competitors, executives, directors, board relationships, executive compensation, products & brands, outside service firms, recent mergers & acquisitions, corporate hierarchy (family tree), and company news. Executive biographical information includes: photo, year of birth, gender, education, associations, awards, board memberships, current & former positions, and executive move alerts.

On Tuesday will be Dr. Shaireen Rashid's lecture, Sexuality, Islam, and the War on Terror. "The image of a veiled woman captioned, 'Face of Islam' appears in juxtaposition to the photos of the crumbling twin towers of the world trade center. Featured in the NY Times photo essay of the year 2001, those often repeated media images link the oppression of Muslim women to terrorist violence (December 31, 2001). They also point to the gender politics on the war on terror, and the ways gender has been manipulated to reinforce a clash of civilizations of Islam vs. the West (Huntington, 1996 ). In his 9/11 anniversary speech in 2006, Bush said that we are fighting a war 'against a radical Islam empire where women are prisoners in their own home.' Women's interests have been the civilizing mission in the war on terror. And the veil continues to take the center stage to this discourse. This presentation critically elucidates why and how these discourses that surround the oppression of Muslim woman have become the yardstick to measure the West's secular stand on liberal rights, especially in the manifestation of rights pertaining to Muslim women's sexuality." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 12:30-1:45 in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, there will be a blood drive from 8:30am-8:30pm in the Hillwood Pioneer Room. Please donate if you can. For more information, call 516-299-2800.

On Wednesday, Exploring Careers & Choosing a Major will be discussed upstairs in room LB384 from 12:30-1:30. "Are you exploring majors, but still uncertain of the right direction? Thinking of switching majors? Join us for a lively discussion on the common myths and realities that often shape students' decisions when choosing a major. Come and gain valuable tips on how to make good choices about majors, minors, and careers. For more information, please call Staci Siegel at 516-299-2582 or email at staci.siegel@liu.edu"

On Wednesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, Digital Storytelling. "Digital Storytelling is an extension of traditional storytelling that can be innovatively used by teachers across the K-12 curriculum for individual or collaborative projects and assignments. Using a variety of media, such as photos, video, animation, sound, and narration, students can create stories that are educational or imaginative and fun. The workshop will include a demonstration of select storytelling tools and hands-on experience." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Thursday, Dr. Margaret Hallissy will lead a book discussion based on How Does It Feel to Be a Problem? Being Young and Arab in America by Moustafa Bayoumi. "Just over a century ago, W.E.B. Du Bois posed a probing question in his classic The Souls of Black Folk: 'How does it feel to be a problem?' Now, Moustafa Bayoumi asks the same about America's new 'problem': Arab- and Muslim-Americans. Bayoumi takes readers into the lives of seven twenty-something's living in Brooklyn, home to the largest Arab-American population in the United States." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 10:30-12:00 in the Hillwood Commons Pioneer Room, but registration is required. Please call 516-299-2895 to reserve your place.

These events are part of a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

On Thursday, Selenay Aytac and Robert Battenfeld will present a library brown-bag workshop on Using Scopus: Creating Publication and Subject Alerts. "Are you interested in learning how to create publication and subject alerts in Scopus? If so please join us for a hands-on training session featuring instruction on how to create publication and subject alerts that will automatically email you when an author's publication, keywords, affiliations or other search criteria appear in the Scopus database. You will be able to connect to the citation, download the citation, and full text (when available) from the alert of Scopus. Scopus is the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed research literature. It includes over 19,000 titles from more than 5,000 international publishers and offers researchers a quick, easy and comprehensive resource to support their research needs in the scientific, technical, and medical and social sciences fields as well as the arts and humanities disciplines. For more information on this database please consult our Library Guide. During the training session you will learn the most effective ways to create publication and subject alerts in this database. It will begin at 12:30 in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220). Light refreshments will be served, but in the spirit of a true brown bag please feel free to bring your lunch. Please RSVP using this form. Questions? Comments? Contact Selenay.Aytac@liu.edu or Robert.Battenfeld@liu.edu."



10/15 : Movie Posters, Islamic Perspectives on Globalization, Community Library in Uganda
Keeping with the Halloween theme, the Special Collections Department has placed a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway that feature Houses of Horrors. These are only a few examples of the over 6,000 posters from 1940 through 1962 in the Original Movie Poster Research Collection. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.

On Wednesday will be Dr. Shahid Siddiqi's lecture, The Pursuit of Knowledge in a Globalizing World: An Islamic Perspective. "The obligation of living in the globalizing world of the 21st century is for each individual to contribute to the prevention and solution of local, regional and global problems. Increasing complexity does not permit any exclusion - secular or religious. 'Muslim Journeys' have evolved over a period of about 14 centuries interconnecting antiquity to modernity across the occident and the orient. This has included the entire spectrum of the 'knowledge structure' including exhortation, pursuit, epistemology, research, application and dissemination. In an interdependent world of values and facts, it has become a pressing imperative for the travelers in the Islamic value system with its super-ordinate concern for stewardship, to energize the pursuit of global responsibility vis a vis knowledge and the sciences. This presentation attempts to analyze the 'Muslim Journeys' linkage between the classical-medieval-modern period. It aims to identify the core values from an Islamic perspective, which may drive the knowledge enterprise in spirit, form and dynamics. The talk is concerned with the sustainability of humanity in a pluralistic, global civilization with increasing social, economic and ecological challenges." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 12:30-1:45 at the Top of the Commons in Hillwood Commons.

On Thursday, the Palmer School of Library and Information Science will present the lecture, Working Beyond Books: A Community Library in Uganda, by Dr. Kate Parry. It will run from 6:00-7:00 upstairs in room 362.

Next Tuesday will be Dr. Shaireen Rashid's lecture, Sexuality, Islam, and the War on Terror. "The image of a veiled woman captioned, 'Face of Islam' appears in juxtaposition to the photos of the crumbling twin towers of the world trade center. Featured in the NY Times photo essay of the year 2001, those often repeated media images link the oppression of Muslim women to terrorist violence (December 31, 2001). They also point to the gender politics on the war on terror, and the ways gender has been manipulated to reinforce a clash of civilizations of Islam vs. the West (Huntington, 1996 ). In his 9/11 anniversary speech in 2006, Bush said that we are fighting a war 'against a radical Islam empire where women are prisoners in their own home.' Women's interests have been the civilizing mission in the war on terror. And the veil continues to take the center stage to this discourse. This presentation critically elucidates why and how these discourses that surround the oppression of Muslim woman have become the yardstick to measure the West's secular stand on liberal rights, especially in the manifestation of rights pertaining to Muslim women's sexuality." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 12:30-1:45 in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall.

These lectures are part of a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

Next Tuesday and Wednesday, there will be a blood drive from 8:30am-8:30pm in the Hillwood Pioneer Room. Please donate if you can. For more information, call 516-299-2800.

Due to the government shut-down, the ERIC website is not currently available. However our ERIC subscription through Ebsco is not affected by this and is still working. Access to the education journal articles is also unaffected, but Ebsco will not be able to retrieve the full text of ERIC documents until the website reopens. We have the older ERIC documents on microfiche downstairs in the Periodicals Department. The government's PubMed website of Medline is slightly affected, but Ebsco's Medline is fully functional. Both databases may not be updated with the newest citations until this matter is resolved.



10/13 : Autism Resources, Holiday Hours, Library Competency Exam, E-Portfolios Workshop, Islam Lectures
On the pathfinder to Online Resources for Autism and Asperger Syndrome, a section for reviews of tests and measurement instruments from the Mental Measurements Yearbook has been added. Also, a new title has been added to the journals section, along with remote access links to the journals that were lacking them so that you can now access everything on the page from home.

On Monday, the library will be open 9:00-5:00 in observance of Columbus Day.

On Tuesday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 3:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, Digital or E-Portfolios for Students and Teachers. "E-portfolios provide a creative means for students and teachers to demonstrate their individual and collaborative work, technological abilities, and achievements over a period of time. It helps them to reflect on their professional development and create an awareness of successful learning strategies. Using software such as Digication, participants will see how easy it is to create a structured portfolio showcasing a wide variety of electronic artifacts, such as text, electronic files, multimedia, Adobe PDFs, web-links, blogs, and wikis." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

Also on Tuesday will be Zeshan Hamid's lecture, What an Educator Should Know About Islam. "This is an interactive and enlightening program that helps educators learn and understand the basics of Islam so they can approach Muslim students appropriately. The program goes over a basic history about Islam, common myths associated with Islam, and a question/answer session." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 12:30-1:45 at the Top of the Commons in Hillwood Commons.

On Wednesday will be Dr. Shahid Siddiqi's lecture, The Pursuit of Knowledge in a Globalizing World: An Islamic Perspective. "The obligation of living in the globalizing world of the 21st century is for each individual to contribute to the prevention and solution of local, regional and global problems. Increasing complexity does not permit any exclusion - secular or religious. 'Muslim Journeys' have evolved over a period of about 14 centuries interconnecting antiquity to modernity across the occident and the orient. This has included the entire spectrum of the 'knowledge structure' including exhortation, pursuit, epistemology, research, application and dissemination. In an interdependent world of values and facts, it has become a pressing imperative for the travelers in the Islamic value system with its super-ordinate concern for stewardship, to energize the pursuit of global responsibility vis a vis knowledge and the sciences. This presentation attempts to analyze the 'Muslim Journeys' linkage between the classical-medieval-modern period. It aims to identify the core values from an Islamic perspective, which may drive the knowledge enterprise in spirit, form and dynamics. The talk is concerned with the sustainability of humanity in a pluralistic, global civilization with increasing social, economic and ecological challenges." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 12:30-1:45 at the Top of the Commons in Hillwood Commons.

These lectures are part of a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

Due to the government shut-down, the ERIC website is not currently available. However our ERIC subscription through Ebsco is not affected by this and is still working. Access to the education journal articles is also unaffected, but Ebsco will not be able to retrieve the full text of ERIC documents until the website reopens. We have the older ERIC documents on microfiche downstairs in the Periodicals Department. The government's PubMed website of Medline is slightly affected, but Ebsco's Medline is fully functional. Both databases may not be updated with the newest citations until this matter is resolved.



10/09 : Lots of Database News, Library Competency Exams, Holiday Hours, E-Portfolios Workshop, Islam Lectures
There are two new databases that will be available for a trial period. African American Archives provides over one million pages of primary source, original historical documents pertaining to the African American experience over several centuries dating back to 1672. Files contain detailed personal stories and narrative accounts of subjects' activities and include information about families, occupations, and general activities. It includes: letters - annual reports - account books - news clippings - notational cards - quantitative data - government records - prisoner of war papers - casualty sheets and death reports - original muster and hospital rolls - enlistment papers and lists of deserters - records of the Southern Claims Commission - related manuscripts from the American Colonization Society - and much more.

Divided into five series, the American Antiquarian Society Historical Periodicals Collection provides the full text from thousands of periodicals, magazines, and newspapers dating from 1691 to 1877 and covering all aspects of American life, society, politics, and culture during these five time periods. Topics include: industrialization - life on the western frontier - regional political differences - rising tensions that lead to the Civil War along with news from the battlefronts - the incorporation of the recently-freed African Americans into American life - and much more.

The SPSS Statistics software is now available on the computers in the Library Instruction Lab and will soon be available on the rest of the computers in Reference Commons.

The ARTstor database of digital images will be down for scheduled maintenance on Thursday morning from 6:00-10:00.

The problem with access to the Children's Literature Comprehensive Database has been resolved.

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. There will be an additional exam given on Tuesday at 3:30. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

On Monday, the library will be open 9:00-5:00 in observance of Columbus Day.

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, Digital or E-Portfolios for Students and Teachers. "E-portfolios provide a creative means for students and teachers to demonstrate their individual and collaborative work, technological abilities, and achievements over a period of time. It helps them to reflect on their professional development and create an awareness of successful learning strategies. Using software such as Digication, participants will see how easy it is to create a structured portfolio showcasing a wide variety of electronic artifacts, such as text, electronic files, multimedia, Adobe PDFs, web-links, blogs, and wikis." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

Also on Tuesday will be Zeshan Hamid's lecture, What an Educator Should Know About Islam. "This is an interactive and enlightening program that helps educators learn and understand the basics of Islam so they can approach Muslim students appropriately. The program goes over a basic history about Islam, common myths associated with Islam, and a question/answer session." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 12:30-1:45 at the Top of the Commons in Hillwood Commons.

On Wednesday will be Dr. Shahid Siddiqi's lecture, The Pursuit of Knowledge in a Globalizing World: An Islamic Perspective. "The obligation of living in the globalizing world of the 21st century is for each individual to contribute to the prevention and solution of local, regional and global problems. Increasing complexity does not permit any exclusion - secular or religious. 'Muslim Journeys' have evolved over a period of about 14 centuries interconnecting antiquity to modernity across the occident and the orient. This has included the entire spectrum of the 'knowledge structure' including exhortation, pursuit, epistemology, research, application and dissemination. In an interdependent world of values and facts, it has become a pressing imperative for the travelers in the Islamic value system with its super-ordinate concern for stewardship, to energize the pursuit of global responsibility vis a vis knowledge and the sciences. This presentation attempts to analyze the 'Muslim Journeys' linkage between the classical-medieval-modern period. It aims to identify the core values from an Islamic perspective, which may drive the knowledge enterprise in spirit, form and dynamics. The talk is concerned with the sustainability of humanity in a pluralistic, global civilization with increasing social, economic and ecological challenges." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 12:30-1:45 at the Top of the Commons in Hillwood Commons.

These lectures are part of a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

There are four new databases for your enjoyment: Nursing Education in Video is an online collection of videos created specifically for the education and training of nurses, nursing assistants, and other healthcare workers that allow students and practitioners to see, experience, and study nursing techniques and theories. Faculty can create annotated playlists and link directly to them. ProQuest Statistical Abstract of the United States is comprehensive summary of statistics on the social, political, and economic organization of the United States and provides 1400 statistical tables from 400 different sources. Entertainment Industry Magazine Archive provides the full text of seventeen magazines from the years 1880-2000 that cover the history of the film, music, radio, theater, television, and other entertainment industries such as vaudeville, music halls, and circuses. It includes industry news, gossip columns, reviews, interviews, and more. eLibrary Elementary provides over 440 full text books, magazines, and more designed for elementary school children. Teachers can search for materials by Lexile or reading level and find content that is directly linked to state and national teaching standards.

The Sage Full-Text Collections for Education, Psychology, and Health Sciences are no longer available, but you can click the links to see all of the other databases and online journals that we still have for those fields.

Due to the government shut-down, the ERIC website is not currently available. However our ERIC subscription through Ebsco is not affected by this and is still working. Access to the education journal articles is also unaffected, but Ebsco will not be able to retrieve the full text of ERIC documents until the website reopens. We have the older ERIC documents on microfiche downstairs in the Periodicals Department. The government's PubMed website of Medline is slightly affected, but Ebsco's Medline is fully functional. Both databases may not be updated with the newest citations until this matter is resolved.



10/08 : Nursing, Statistics, Entertainment, Children, Databases, Education, Islam, Competency Exams, Holiday Hours
There are four new databases for your enjoyment: Nursing Education in Video is an online collection of videos created specifically for the education and training of nurses, nursing assistants, and other healthcare workers that allow students and practitioners to see, experience, and study nursing techniques and theories. Faculty can create annotated playlists and link directly to them. ProQuest Statistical Abstract of the United States is comprehensive summary of statistics on the social, political, and economic organization of the United States and provides 1400 statistical tables from 400 different sources. Entertainment Industry Magazine Archive provides the full text of seventeen magazines from the years 1880-2000 that cover the history of the film, music, radio, theater, television, and other entertainment industries such as vaudeville, music halls, and circuses. It includes industry news, gossip columns, reviews, interviews, and more. eLibrary Elementary provides over 440 full text books, magazines, and more designed for elementary school children. Teachers can search for materials by Lexile or reading level and find content that is directly linked to state and national teaching standards.

There is currently a problem with access to the Children's Literature Comprehensive Database.

The Sage Full-Text Collections for Education, Psychology, and Health Sciences are no longer available, but you can click the links to see all of the other databases and online journals that we still have for those fields.

On Wedesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, WebQuests. "WebQuests are online inquiry-oriented lesson formats that make an effective use of Internet resources. They have been embraced by educational technologists and teachers world-wide. WebQuests provide a rich, technology-enabled environment for team participation, research, and collaboration. They also extend content knowledge and promote critical thinking activities. The workshop will demonstrate how to use the free software, Weebly, to develop a WebQuest." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

Also on Wednesday, there will be an Online Teaching Forum upstairs in the Palmer School, room 362, from 3:00-4:30. "The Office of Academic Affairs invites you to learn and share useful tips and insights into teaching web-facilitated, blended or online courses. Please R.S.V.P. to Amy Gaimaro, LIU Post Instructional Designer, at amy.gaimaro@liu.edu"

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. There will be an additional exam given on Tuesday at 3:30. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

On Monday, the library will be open 9:00-5:00 in observance of Columbus Day.

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, Digital or E-Portfolios for Students and Teachers. "E-portfolios provide a creative means for students and teachers to demonstrate their individual and collaborative work, technological abilities, and achievements over a period of time. It helps them to reflect on their professional development and create an awareness of successful learning strategies. Using software such as Digication, participants will see how easy it is to create a structured portfolio showcasing a wide variety of electronic artifacts, such as text, electronic files, multimedia, Adobe PDFs, web-links, blogs, and wikis." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

Also on Tuesday will be Zeshan Hamid's lecture, What an Educator Should Know About Islam. "This is an interactive and enlightening program that helps educators learn and understand the basics of Islam so they can approach Muslim students appropriately. The program goes over a basic history about Islam, common myths associated with Islam, and a question/answer session." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will run from 12:30-1:45 at the Top of the Commons in Hillwood Commons.

These lectures are part of a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

Due to the government shut-down, the ERIC website is not currently available. However our ERIC subscription through Ebsco is not affected by this and is still working. Access to the education journal articles is also unaffected, but Ebsco will not be able to retrieve the full text of ERIC documents until the website reopens. We have the older ERIC documents on microfiche downstairs in the Periodicals Department. The government's PubMed website of Medline is slightly affected, but Ebsco's Medline is fully functional. Both databases may not be updated with the newest citations until this matter is resolved.



10/06 : Napoleon in Egypt Lecture, Muslim Immigrants Panel, WebQuests Workshop, and Competency Exam
On Monday, Dr. Bob Brier will present the lecture, Napoleon's Invasion of Egypt: A Crucial Meeting Islamic and Christian Cultures. "When Napoleon Bonaparte invaded Egypt in 1798, along with his army, he brought 150 artists, linguists, and scientists of all kinds to describe Egypt. It was the first ethnographic study of its kind and was also the beginning of modern Egyptology. They discovered the Rosetta stone, the key to deciphering hieroglyphs. When the savants returned to France, they published the Description de L'Egypte, the first accurate representation of Egyptian antiquities to the western world. It was a massive work, taking 20 years to complete and started a wave of Egyptomania that continues today. They also introduced the west to Islamic architecture and customs. This illustrated lecture traces Bonaparte's Egyptian campaign as a unique interaction between the Islamic and western worlds." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall from 12:30-1:45.

On Tuesday, Dr. Iftikhar Ahmad will moderate a panel, consisting of Amjad Mahmood Khan, Nasim Mehdi, and Zeshan Hamid, to discuss Muslim Journeys: The Experiences of One Immigrant Community in the United States. They will "explore the historical development of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community in America. In the early 20th century, its missionaries started arriving from India with the purpose of sharing the message of peace and brotherhood with the American people. Their message was quickly embraced by many, especially the African-American population in urban centers. They set up missions all across the United States. Today the Ahmadiyya community is the fastest growing and most vibrant group dedicated to building peace and inter-cultural understanding in America." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall from 12:30-1:45.

These lectures are part of a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

A tentative schedule of the library's holiday and wintersession hours has been posted, along with the extended hours for final exams. Elsewhere on the campus website, the finals schedule has been posted.

On Wedesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, WebQuests. " WebQuests are online inquiry-oriented lesson formats that make an effective use of Internet resources. They have been embraced by educational technologists and teachers world-wide. WebQuests provide a rich, technology-enabled environment for team participation, research, and collaboration. They also extend content knowledge and promote critical thinking activities. The workshop will demonstrate how to use the free software, Weebly, to develop a WebQuest." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

Also on Wednesday, there will be an Online Teaching Forum upstairs in the Palmer School, room 362, from 3:00-4:30. "The Office of Academic Affairs invites you to learn and share useful tips and insights into teaching web-facilitated, blended or online courses. Please R.S.V.P. to Amy Gaimaro, LIU Post Instructional Designer, at amy.gaimaro@liu.edu"

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

Due to the government shut-down, the ERIC website is not currently available. However our ERIC subscription through Ebsco is not affected by this and is still working. Access to the education journal articles is also unaffected, but Ebsco will not be able to retrieve the full text of ERIC documents until the website reopens. We have the older ERIC documents on microfiche downstairs in the Periodicals Department. The government's PubMed website of Medline is slightly affected, but Ebsco's Medline is fully functional. Both databases may not be updated with the newest citations until this matter is resolved.



10/03 : Movie Posters, Film Lecture, Artists' Reception, Napoleon in Egypt, Muslim Immigrants, Educational Technology
Getting ready for Halloween, the Special Collections Department has placed a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway, showcasing four films from Bravo's list of the 100 Scariest Movie Moments. These are only a few examples of the over 6,000 posters from 1940 through 1962 in the Original Movie Poster Research Collection. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.

On Friday, the Post Library Association will present the lecture, Cinema Agonistes. "A professional film critic for over 20 years, Michael Atkinson addresses the changes in and collapsing aesthetics of modern movies. Doomsaying about cinema going to the dogs has been prevalent since 1909, when new and more intimate two-shots rankled traditionalist reviewers. But the medium has indisputably changed over the century, evolving different syntactical strategies to meet different audience needs, and itís now facing its most radical sea-change yet - the essential crisis created by the unstoppable march of technology, through which the ways we watch film have changed the movies themselves. Is Citizen Kane the same on an iPhone as it is on the screen at Radio City Music Hall? Are we the same? How do new Hollywood films differ from those of 30 or 60 years ago, and why? The dynamic has unarguably altered, for reasons that go back to Sophocles and Shakespeare, and may in fact suggest new forms for the future that will replace cinema as a primary cultural form." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place in the back of Reference Commons at 8:00 p.m.

On Sunday, there will be an artists' reception from 1:00-4:00 for the new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery, the fifth annual Seven & Seven, featuring the work of painters: Leslie Barnett, Nanette Fluhr, Dan Fusco, Liz Jorg Masi, Donna Harlow Moraff, Howard Rose, and Marie Sheehy Walker; and sculptors: Arthur Bernstein, Daniel Brown, Alex Chwick, Shawn McAvoy, Alice Riordan, Kiril Tzotchev, and Marcia Wolfson. A hand picked group of extraordinarily gifted artists come together to create an exhibit of great merit. The showcase format gives each artist the opportunity to show the full breadth of their abilities, styles, and inspirations. Each member presents seven to ten pieces. The beautiful mix of paintings and sculpture creates an overall rich and captivating experience for the viewing public.

On Monday, Dr. Bob Brier will present the lecture, Napoleon's Invasion of Egypt: A Crucial Meeting Islamic and Christian Cultures. "When Napoleon Bonaparte invaded Egypt in 1798, along with his army, he brought 150 artists, linguists, and scientists of all kinds to describe Egypt. It was the first ethnographic study of its kind and was also the beginning of modern Egyptology. They discovered the Rosetta stone, the key to deciphering hieroglyphs. When the savants returned to France, they published the Description de L'Egypte, the first accurate representation of Egyptian antiquities to the western world. It was a massive work, taking 20 years to complete and started a wave of Egyptomania that continues today. They also introduced the west to Islamic architecture and customs. This illustrated lecture traces Bonaparte's Egyptian campaign as a unique interaction between the Islamic and western worlds." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall from 12:30-1:45.

On Tuesday, Dr. Iftikhar Ahmad will moderate a panel, consisting of Amjad Mahmood Khan, Nasim Mehdi, and Zeshan Hamid, to discuss Muslim Journeys: The Experiences of One Immigrant Community in the United States. They will "explore the historical development of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community in America. In the early 20th century, its missionaries started arriving from India with the purpose of sharing the message of peace and brotherhood with the American people. Their message was quickly embraced by many, especially the African-American population in urban centers. They set up missions all across the United States. Today the Ahmadiyya community is the fastest growing and most vibrant group dedicated to building peace and inter-cultural understanding in America." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall from 12:30-1:45.

These lectures are part of a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

On Wedesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, WebQuests. " WebQuests are online inquiry-oriented lesson formats that make an effective use of Internet resources. They have been embraced by educational technologists and teachers world-wide. WebQuests provide a rich, technology-enabled environment for team participation, research, and collaboration. They also extend content knowledge and promote critical thinking activities. The workshop will demonstrate how to use the free software, Weebly, to develop a WebQuest." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

Also on Wednesday, there will be an Online Teaching Forum upstairs in the Palmer School, room 362, from 3:00-4:30. "The Office of Academic Affairs invites you to learn and share useful tips and insights into teaching web-facilitated, blended or online courses. Please R.S.V.P. to Amy Gaimaro, LIU Post Instructional Designer, at amy.gaimaro@liu.edu"

Due to the government shut-down, the ERIC website is not currently available. However our ERIC subscription through Ebsco is not affected by this and is still working. Access to the education journal articles is also unaffected, but Ebsco will not be able to retrieve the full text of ERIC documents until the website reopens. We have the older ERIC documents on microfiche downstairs in the Periodicals Department. The government's PubMed website of Medline is slightly affected, but Ebsco's Medline is fully functional. Both databases may not be updated with the newest citations until this matter is resolved.



10/01 : Art Exhibit, Library Competency Exam, Film Lecture, Database News, and Muslim Journeys
The new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery is the fifth annual Seven & Seven, featuring the work of painters: Leslie Barnett, Nanette Fluhr, Dan Fusco, Liz Jorg Masi, Donna Harlow Moraff, Howard Rose, and Marie Sheehy Walker; and sculptors: Arthur Bernstein, Daniel Brown, Alex Chwick, Shawn McAvoy, Alice Riordan, Kiril Tzotchev, and Marcia Wolfson. A hand picked group of extraordinarily gifted artists come together to create an exhibit of great merit. The showcase format gives each artist the opportunity to show the full breadth of their abilities, styles, and inspirations. Each member presents seven to ten pieces. The beautiful mix of paintings and sculpture creates an overall rich and captivating experience for the viewing public. The artists' reception will be on Sunday from 1:00-4:00.

Due to the government shut-down, the ERIC website is not currently available. However our ERIC subscription through Ebsco is not affected by this and is still working. Access to the education journal articles is also unaffected, but Ebsco will not be able to retrieve the full text of ERIC documents until the website reopens. We have the older ERIC documents on microfiche downstairs in the Periodicals Department. The government's PubMed website of Medline is slightly affected, but Ebsco's Medline is fully functional. Both databases may not be updated with the newest citations until this matter is resolved.

On Wednesday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

On Friday, the Post Library Association will present the lecture, Cinema Agonistes. "A professional film critic for over 20 years, Michael Atkinson addresses the changes in and collapsing aesthetics of modern movies. Doomsaying about cinema going to the dogs has been prevalent since 1909, when new and more intimate two-shots rankled traditionalist reviewers. But the medium has indisputably changed over the century, evolving different syntactical strategies to meet different audience needs, and itís now facing its most radical sea-change yet - the essential crisis created by the unstoppable march of technology, through which the ways we watch film have changed the movies themselves. Is Citizen Kane the same on an iPhone as it is on the screen at Radio City Music Hall? Are we the same? How do new Hollywood films differ from those of 30 or 60 years ago, and why? The dynamic has unarguably altered, for reasons that go back to Sophocles and Shakespeare, and may in fact suggest new forms for the future that will replace cinema as a primary cultural form." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place in the back of Reference Commons at 8:00 p.m.

On Monday, Dr. Bob Brier will present the lecture, Napoleon's Invasion of Egypt: A Crucial Meeting Islamic and Christian Cultures. "When Napoleon Bonaparte invaded Egypt in 1798, along with his army, he brought 150 artists, linguists, and scientists of all kinds to describe Egypt. It was the first ethnographic study of its kind and was also the beginning of modern Egyptology. They discovered the Rosetta stone, the key to deciphering hieroglyphs. When the savants returned to France, they published the Description de L'Egypte, the first accurate representation of Egyptian antiquities to the western world. It was a massive work, taking 20 years to complete and started a wave of Egyptomania that continues today. They also introduced the west to Islamic architecture and customs. This illustrated lecture traces Bonaparte's Egyptian campaign as a unique interaction between the Islamic and western worlds." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall from 12:30-1:45.

On Tuesday, Dr. Iftikhar Ahmad will moderate a panel, consisting of Amjad Mahmood Khan, Nasim Mehdi, and Zeshan Hamid, to discuss Muslim Journeys: The Experiences of One Immigrant Community in the United States. They will "explore the historical development of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community in America. In the early 20th century, its missionaries started arriving from India with the purpose of sharing the message of peace and brotherhood with the American people. Their message was quickly embraced by many, especially the African-American population in urban centers. They set up missions all across the United States. Today the Ahmadiyya community is the fastest growing and most vibrant group dedicated to building peace and inter-cultural understanding in America." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall from 12:30-1:45.

These lectures are part of a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library and its partners to familiarize the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. They are intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. On exhibit in the library are Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf, featuring publications selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns, and SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program.

The Dance in Video and Theatre in Video streaming collections of performances from Alexander Street Press should be working properly now.



09/29 : SmartBoard Workshop 3, Library Competency Exam, and Film Lecture
On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, SmartBoard III: Integrating Multimedia, and Using SmartBoard with Other Programs. "Integrate your work from a variety of applications into SmartNotebook. Convert and enhance your Word document or PowerPoint into a SmartNotebook file. Add interactivity, visuals, audio and video, flash animations, either from the Smart Gallery, other websites, or from your own files." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Wednesday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

On Friday, the Post Library Association will present the lecture, Cinema Agonistes. "A professional film critic for over 20 years, Michael Atkinson addresses the changes in and collapsing aesthetics of modern movies. Doomsaying about cinema going to the dogs has been prevalent since 1909, when new and more intimate two-shots rankled traditionalist reviewers. But the medium has indisputably changed over the century, evolving different syntactical strategies to meet different audience needs, and itís now facing its most radical sea-change yet - the essential crisis created by the unstoppable march of technology, through which the ways we watch film have changed the movies themselves. Is Citizen Kane the same on an iPhone as it is on the screen at Radio City Music Hall? Are we the same? How do new Hollywood films differ from those of 30 or 60 years ago, and why? The dynamic has unarguably altered, for reasons that go back to Sophocles and Shakespeare, and may in fact suggest new forms for the future that will replace cinema as a primary cultural form." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place in the back of Reference Commons at 8:00 p.m.

The Dance in Video and Theatre in Video streaming collections of performances from Alexander Street Press are not currently working from off-campus locations - but they are working fine on campus. Library IT is working on a solution (more information). In the meantime, you can take a look at our trial of International Bibliography of Theatre and Dance with Full Text that contains citations to over 60,000 journal articles, books, book chapters, and dissertations along with more than 170 full-text journals and more than 360 full-text books that cover all aspects of theatre, dance, and the performing arts in 126 countries.

The new exhibit in Reference Commons is Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf. The B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library is one of the libraries nationally selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association to receive this collection of books and other resources chosen with a view to familiarizing the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. It is intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. A companion exhibit is Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns. The course analyzed the geometric principles present in examples of Islamic Art and then used those principles to create original patterns. The study of Islamic Art is ideal for a unified interdisciplinary experience in art and mathematics. It can lead to a greater understanding of artistic and cultural concepts. Islamic Art relies heavily on key concepts in mathematics: geometry, symmetry and pattern. Patterns that appear to be complex and intricate can be analyzed to identify a fundamental unit that can be rotated, reflected and translated. Students learn the underlying geometric framework and create their own patterns using Geometer's Sketchpad, the modern equivalent of a compass and straightedge. Also on display is SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program that began in Los Angeles to bring the arts to children in lower income areas whose schools has been affected by budget cuts. Images show the children engaged in calligraphy, portraits, collages, and program exchange. These exhibits harbinger a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library that will take place during October and November.



09/26 : Video Problem, SmartBoard Workshop 3, and Library Competency Exam
The Dance in Video and Theatre in Video streaming collections of performances from Alexander Street Press are not currently working from off-campus locations. Library IT is working on a solution (more information). In the meantime, you can take a look at our trial of International Bibliography of Theatre and Dance with Full Text that contains citations to over 60,000 journal articles, books, book chapters, and dissertations along with more than 170 full-text journals and more than 360 full-text books that cover all aspects of theatre, dance, and the performing arts in 126 countries.

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, SmartBoard III: Integrating Multimedia, and Using SmartBoard with Other Programs. "Integrate your work from a variety of applications into SmartNotebook. Convert and enhance your Word document or PowerPoint into a SmartNotebook file. Add interactivity, visuals, audio and video, flash animations, either from the Smart Gallery, other websites, or from your own files." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Wednesday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

The new exhibit in Reference Commons is Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf. The B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library is one of the libraries nationally selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association to receive this collection of books and other resources chosen with a view to familiarizing the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. It is intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. A companion exhibit is Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns. The course analyzed the geometric principles present in examples of Islamic Art and then used those principles to create original patterns. The study of Islamic Art is ideal for a unified interdisciplinary experience in art and mathematics. It can lead to a greater understanding of artistic and cultural concepts. Islamic Art relies heavily on key concepts in mathematics: geometry, symmetry and pattern. Patterns that appear to be complex and intricate can be analyzed to identify a fundamental unit that can be rotated, reflected and translated. Students learn the underlying geometric framework and create their own patterns using Geometer's Sketchpad, the modern equivalent of a compass and straightedge. Also on display is SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program that began in Los Angeles to bring the arts to children in lower income areas whose schools has been affected by budget cuts. Images show the children engaged in calligraphy, portraits, collages, and program exchange. These exhibits harbinger a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library that will take place during October and November.



09/23 : Muslim Journeys, SmartBoard Workshop, Library Competency Exam, and RDA Intro
The new exhibit in Reference Commons is Muslim Journeys: The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf. The B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library is one of the libraries nationally selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association to receive this collection of books and other resources chosen with a view to familiarizing the American public with Islam and the cultural heritage of Islamic civilizations around the world. It is intended to address both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations. A companion exhibit is Geometry and Islamic Art, featuring geometric artwork produced by students in two Honors courses taught by Mathematics Professor Anne Burns. The course analyzed the geometric principles present in examples of Islamic Art and then used those principles to create original patterns. The study of Islamic Art is ideal for a unified interdisciplinary experience in art and mathematics. It can lead to a greater understanding of artistic and cultural concepts. Islamic Art relies heavily on key concepts in mathematics: geometry, symmetry and pattern. Patterns that appear to be complex and intricate can be analyzed to identify a fundamental unit that can be rotated, reflected and translated. Students learn the underlying geometric framework and create their own patterns using Geometer's Sketchpad, the modern equivalent of a compass and straightedge. Also on display is SAALY Transforming Youth, showcasing the South Asian Art and Literacy for Youth program that began in Los Angeles to bring the arts to children in lower income areas whose schools has been affected by budget cuts. Images show the children engaged in calligraphy, portraits, collages, and program exchange. These exhibits harbinger a series of booktalks, lectures, and other events sponsored by the library that will take place during October and November.

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, SmartBoard II: Creating Interactive Lessons. "Enhance content and motivate students with interactive lessons using Notebook software tools. Create your own lessons or assessments or modify existing resources. Instruction is modified and tailored as per the needs of students." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Thursday, the first Library Competency Exam of the semester will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

Also on Thursday, there will be a Library Brown Bag program featuring an introduction to Resource Description and Access (RDA). "RDA represents a shift in cataloging practice, and many believe that RDA is better suited to the digital environment and will vastly improve the user experience by heightening the discoverability of materials and collections. Professor Natasha Tomlin's presentation will help to bring about an understanding as to how this new cataloging code will affect libraries and library users. The presentation will center on changes in the OPAC record display, as well as new content in the cataloging record." The program, which will take place in the Library Instruction Lab (LB 220) at 10:00, is free and open to all. Light refreshments will be served. Please R.S.V.P. to Natasha Tomlin at Natalia.Tomlin@liu.edu

Students, faculty, and staff will no longer need a library barcode to check out books, access your library account on LIUCat, or, most importantly, access the library's databases of full-text journals and books from home. The same username and password that you currently use to access MyLIU and your email will also work with the library's resources. Just bring your LIU ID card to the Circulation desk (or give them a call at 516-299-2303) to activate your library account, and you'll be ready to get started.

EndNote Web is no longer available, but similar citation management features can be found in RefWorks.



09/22 : SmartBoard Workshop, Library Competency Exam, RDA Intro, Sleepy Hollow Trip
Early Sunday evening, an intermittent problem developed with access to a number of the databases from Gale. If you encounter it, you can try using comparable databases from other companies. We apologize for the inconvenience.

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, SmartBoard II: Creating Interactive Lessons. "Enhance content and motivate students with interactive lessons using Notebook software tools. Create your own lessons or assessments or modify existing resources. Instruction is modified and tailored as per the needs of students." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Thursday, the first Library Competency Exam of the semester will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

Also on Thursday, there will be a Library Brown Bag program featuring an introduction to Resource Description and Access (RDA). "RDA represents a shift in cataloging practice, and many believe that RDA is better suited to the digital environment and will vastly improve the user experience by heightening the discoverability of materials and collections. Professor Natasha Tomlin's presentation will help to bring about an understanding as to how this new cataloging code will affect libraries and library users. The presentation will center on changes in the OPAC record display, as well as new content in the cataloging record." The program, which will take place in the Library Instruction Lab (LB 220) at 10:00, is free and open to all. Light refreshments will be served. Please R.S.V.P. to Natasha Tomlin at Natalia.Tomlin@liu.edu

EndNote Web is no longer available, but similar citation management features can be found in RefWorks.

On September 26, the Post Library Association will hosting a trip to Sleepy Hollow and Tarrytown: Where the Legend Begins. "The 'Legend of Sleepy Hollow' began almost 200 years ago when Washington Irving wrote about the beautiful valley straddling along the shores of the Hudson River. A short distance outside of New York City, this bus trip will afford the opportunity to view panoramic and scenic vistas of the Hudson River, the Palisades Mountain Range, and the Tappan Zee Bridge. The first stop will be Philipsburg Manor, which was a thriving farming, milling, and trading center during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. A short distance from Philipsburg Manor is the Old Dutch Church of Sleepy Hollow, which has been used since 1609, and the Old Dutch Burying Ground where Ichabod Crane hid from the Headless Horseman. The next stop will be a guided tour of Union Church where we will view the stained glass windows by Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall. After visiting Union Church, we will stop for lunch at Bridge View Tavern, a family owned and operated restaurant. Our last and final visit will be a tour of Sunnyside, the home of Washington Irving who was the author of 'Legend of Sleepy Hollow' and 'Rip van Winkle'." The cost is $95 for OBHA and PLA members and $115 for non-members. Please reserve your place before September 23.

Students, faculty, and staff will no longer need a library barcode to check out books, access your library account on LIUCat, or, most importantly, access the library's databases of full-text journals and books from home. The same username and password that you currently use to access MyLIU and your email will also work with the library's resources. Just bring your LIU ID card to the Circulation desk (or give them a call at 516-299-2303) to activate your library account, and you'll be ready to get started.

The new exhibit that is currently being put up in the library lobby is Founding Fathers. Presented as part of the library's celebration of Constitution Week (September 17-23), this exhibit features portraits and biographical profiles of John Jay, John Adams, John Marshal, George Read, James Wilson, Patrick Henry, Robert Morris, John Hancock, John Rutledge, Samuel Adams, George Clymer, John Dickinson, Roger Sherman, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Richard Henry Lee, Samuel Huntington, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and more - along with a copy of the Constitution and the preamble to the Declaration of Independence. On our website, you can find the text of the Constitution, as well as quotations about the Constitution and the First Amendment from famous people, and a pathfinder to Constitution resources in the Reference Department.



09/18 : Theatre Books, Artist's Reception, SmartBoard Workshop, No More Barcodes, and Sleepy Hollow Trip
The new exhibit on display in the back of Reference Commons is The Dorothy Dayton Sorzano Theatre Library: New Acquisitions in American Theatre. "This display highlights recent titles acquired with the Dorothy Dayton Sorzano Theatre Library fund. The fund was established at the bequest of Julio Sorzano, a resident of Water Mill on the east end of Long Island and a long-time member of the Friends of the Southampton College Library organization. At the start of World War II, Mr. Sorzano helped to organize and operate Camp Shows, a forerunner of the U.S.O. His lifelong interest in theatre led him to compile a diverse collection of books about the American stage. When he died in 1993, Mr. Sorzano left his collection of theatrical materials (along with funds to grow and promote the collection) to the Southampton College Library, naming it the Dorothy Dayton Sorzano Theatre Library in memory of his wife. With the closing of LIU's Southampton Campus, the majority of the collection was transferred to the B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library at LIU Post. Rare and valuable items from the collection can now be viewed in Special Collections and Archives. The books in this display, original plays and scholarship on American theatre, represent a sampling of new titles acquired with these funds that are available for student and faculty as part of the circulating collection." -- Professor Kathleen Burlingame, Acquisitions Department, curator of the exhibit.

On Friday, there will be an artist's reception for the exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery, Footprints of My Journey, featuring the work of Chee Changboh. It will run from 6:00-9:00 p.m.

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, SmartBoard II: Creating Interactive Lessons. "Enhance content and motivate students with interactive lessons using Notebook software tools. Create your own lessons or assessments or modify existing resources. Instruction is modified and tailored as per the needs of students." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

Students, faculty, and staff will no longer need a library barcode to check out books, access your library account on LIUCat, or, most importantly, access the library's databases of full-text journals and books from home. The same username and password that you currently use to access MyLIU and your email will also work with the library's resources. Just bring your LIU ID card to the Circulation desk (or give them a call at 516-299-2303) to activate your library account, and you'll be ready to get started.

On September 26, the Post Library Association will hosting a trip to Sleepy Hollow and Tarrytown: Where the Legend Begins. "The 'Legend of Sleepy Hollow' began almost 200 years ago when Washington Irving wrote about the beautiful valley straddling along the shores of the Hudson River. A short distance outside of New York City, this bus trip will afford the opportunity to view panoramic and scenic vistas of the Hudson River, the Palisades Mountain Range, and the Tappan Zee Bridge. The first stop will be Philipsburg Manor, which was a thriving farming, milling, and trading center during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. A short distance from Philipsburg Manor is the Old Dutch Church of Sleepy Hollow, which has been used since 1609, and the Old Dutch Burying Ground where Ichabod Crane hid from the Headless Horseman. The next stop will be a guided tour of Union Church where we will view the stained glass windows by Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall. After visiting Union Church, we will stop for lunch at Bridge View Tavern, a family owned and operated restaurant. Our last and final visit will be a tour of Sunnyside, the home of Washington Irving who was the author of 'Legend of Sleepy Hollow' and 'Rip van Winkle'." The cost is $95 for OBHA and PLA members and $115 for non-members. Please reserve your place before September 23.

The new exhibit that is currently being put up in the library lobby is Founding Fathers. Presented as part of the library's celebration of Constitution Week (September 17-23), this exhibit features portraits and biographical profiles of John Jay, John Adams, John Marshal, George Read, James Wilson, Patrick Henry, Robert Morris, John Hancock, John Rutledge, Samuel Adams, George Clymer, John Dickinson, Roger Sherman, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Richard Henry Lee, Samuel Huntington, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and more - along with a copy of the Constitution and the preamble to the Declaration of Independence. On our website, you can find the text of the Constitution, as well as quotations about the Constitution and the First Amendment from famous people, and a pathfinder to Constitution resources in the Reference Department.



09/16 : Technical Difficulties, No More Barcodes, Art Exhibit, SmartBoard Workshop, and Sleepy Hollow Trip
Students, faculty, and staff will no longer need a library barcode to check out books, access your library account on LIUCat, or, most importantly, access the library's databases of full-text journals and books from home. The same username and password that you currently use to access MyLIU and your email will also work with the library's resources. Just bring your LIU ID card to the Circulation desk (or give them a call at 516-299-2303) to activate your library account, and you'll be ready to get started.

Unfortunately, we've encountered the first glitch with the new system. If you are using one of our databases and try to get the full text of an article by clicking on the link labeled, "LinkSource", you might get an error message that says, "The address you are trying to access is invalid." If you are currently somewhere on campus, make a note of the company that provides the database and go to our alphabetical list of databases. Scroll way down to the bottom to the section labeled, "Backup Links (Non-Remote Access)". Click on the company name and then the appropriate database. You can then either redo your search or just type in the name of the article that you want. The links to the text should then work properly. If you are searching from a location somewhere off campus, you can contact the Reference Desk by telephone (516-299-2305) or by online chat or, if you are not in a hurry, by email. They can locate the article and email it to you. Users on campus are also welcome to contact the Reference Desk for help. We are working to resolve this problem.

On Tuesday, the art exhibit opening downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery is Footprints of My Journey, featuring the work of Chee Changboh. The artist's reception will be on Friday from 6:00-9:00 p.m.

On Wednesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, SmartBoard Basics. "This touch-sensitive interactive whiteboard connects to the computer and projector and enables you to control all computer applications directly from the display. It is a powerful medium for engaging students and audiences and has several tools for enhancing teaching, creating lessons, and delivering presentations." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On September 26, the Post Library Association will hosting a trip to Sleepy Hollow and Tarrytown: Where the Legend Begins. "The 'Legend of Sleepy Hollow' began almost 200 years ago when Washington Irving wrote about the beautiful valley straddling along the shores of the Hudson River. A short distance outside of New York City, this bus trip will afford the opportunity to view panoramic and scenic vistas of the Hudson River, the Palisades Mountain Range, and the Tappan Zee Bridge. The first stop will be Philipsburg Manor, which was a thriving farming, milling, and trading center during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. A short distance from Philipsburg Manor is the Old Dutch Church of Sleepy Hollow, which has been used since 1609, and the Old Dutch Burying Ground where Ichabod Crane hid from the Headless Horseman. The next stop will be a guided tour of Union Church where we will view the stained glass windows by Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall. After visiting Union Church, we will stop for lunch at Bridge View Tavern, a family owned and operated restaurant. Our last and final visit will be a tour of Sunnyside, the home of Washington Irving who was the author of 'Legend of Sleepy Hollow' and 'Rip van Winkle'." The cost is $95 for OBHA and PLA members and $115 for non-members. Please reserve your place before September 23.

The new exhibit that is currently being put up in the library lobby is Founding Fathers. Presented as part of the library's celebration of Constitution Week (September 17-23), this exhibit features portraits and biographical profiles of John Jay, John Adams, John Marshal, George Read, James Wilson, Patrick Henry, Robert Morris, John Hancock, John Rutledge, Samuel Adams, George Clymer, John Dickinson, Roger Sherman, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Richard Henry Lee, Samuel Huntington, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and more - along with a copy of the Constitution and the preamble to the Declaration of Independence. On our website, you can find the text of the Constitution, as well as quotations about the Constitution and the First Amendment from famous people, and a pathfinder to Constitution resources in the Reference Department.



09/15 : No More Barcodes, Art Exhibit, SmartBoard Workshop, and Sleepy Hollow Trip
As of Sunday evening, students, faculty, and staff will no longer need a library barcode to check out books, access your library account on LIUCat, or, most importantly, access the library's databases of full-text journals and books from home. The same username and password that you currently use to access MyLIU and your email will also work with the library's resources. Just bring your LIU ID card to the Circulation desk (or give them a call at 516-299-2303) to activate your library account, and you'll be ready to get started.

On Tuesday, the art exhibit opening downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery is Footprints of My Journey, featuring the work of Chee Changboh. The artist's reception will be on Friday from 6:00-9:00 p.m.

On Wednesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special hands-on educational technology workshop, SmartBoard Basics. "This touch-sensitive interactive whiteboard connects to the computer and projector and enables you to control all computer applications directly from the display. It is a powerful medium for engaging students and audiences and has several tools for enhancing teaching, creating lessons, and delivering presentations." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to Abir at the IMC ext. 2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On September 26, the Post Library Association will hosting a trip to Sleepy Hollow and Tarrytown: Where the Legend Begins. "The 'Legend of Sleepy Hollow' began almost 200 years ago when Washington Irving wrote about the beautiful valley straddling along the shores of the Hudson River. A short distance outside of New York City, this bus trip will afford the opportunity to view panoramic and scenic vistas of the Hudson River, the Palisades Mountain Range, and the Tappan Zee Bridge. The first stop will be Philipsburg Manor, which was a thriving farming, milling, and trading center during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. A short distance from Philipsburg Manor is the Old Dutch Church of Sleepy Hollow, which has been used since 1609, and the Old Dutch Burying Ground where Ichabod Crane hid from the Headless Horseman. The next stop will be a guided tour of Union Church where we will view the stained glass windows by Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall. After visiting Union Church, we will stop for lunch at Bridge View Tavern, a family owned and operated restaurant. Our last and final visit will be a tour of Sunnyside, the home of Washington Irving who was the author of 'Legend of Sleepy Hollow' and 'Rip van Winkle'." The cost is $95 for OBHA and PLA members and $115 for non-members. Please reserve your place before September 23.

The new exhibit that is currently being put up in the library lobby is Founding Fathers. Presented as part of the library's celebration of Constitution Week (September 17-23), this exhibit features portraits and biographical profiles of John Jay, John Adams, John Marshal, George Read, James Wilson, Patrick Henry, Robert Morris, John Hancock, John Rutledge, Samuel Adams, George Clymer, John Dickinson, Roger Sherman, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Richard Henry Lee, Samuel Huntington, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and more - along with a copy of the Constitution and the preamble to the Declaration of Independence. On our website, you can find the text of the Constitution, as well as quotations about the Constitution and the First Amendment from famous people, and a pathfinder to Constitution resources in the Reference Department.

There are three new databases available for your use. International Bibliography of Theatre and Dance with Full Text was initiated by the American Society for Theatre Research and continued, since 1984, by the Theatre Research Data Center (TRDC) at Brooklyn College. It covers all aspects of theatre, dance, and the performing arts in 126 countries. It contains citations to over 60,000 journal articles, books, book chapters, and dissertations along with more than 170 full-text journals and more than 360 full-text books (available for a two month trial). Entertainment Industry Magazine Archive provides the full text of seventeen trade and fan magazines from the years 1880-2000 that cover the history of the film, music, radio, theater, television, and other entertainment industries such as vaudeville, music halls, and circuses. ProQuest Statistical Abstract of the United States is a comprehensive summary of statistics on the social, political, and economic organization of the United States. It includes: monthly updates to tables - deep searching at the line-item level - links to the websites of the data providers - image and spreadsheet versions of all current and historical tables - and powerful facets for narrowing search results by source, data date, subject, and type of data breakdown.

The printer at the reference desk has been replaced by a new one behind the circulation counter. Make a note of your computer's number, click print, and go to the counter to pick up your pages (do not exit the database until you are sure that your printout is okay). The first 10 pages are free. After that, the cost is 10 cents per page. You can print on only one side of each page. You can also print in color for 25 cents for every page (be sure to select the color printer from the print menu first).

There is now a scanner at the reference desk. You can scan pages from books or other documents and save them to a flash drive or email them to yourself.



09/12 : New Exhibit, Competency Exams, Databases, and Sleepy Hollow Trip
The new exhibit that is currently being put up in the library lobby is Founding Fathers. Presented as part of the library's celebration of Constitution Week (September 17-23), this exhibit features portraits and biographical profiles of John Jay, John Adams, John Marshal, George Read, James Wilson, Patrick Henry, Robert Morris, John Hancock, John Rutledge, Samuel Adams, George Clymer, John Dickinson, Roger Sherman, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Richard Henry Lee, Samuel Huntington, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and more - along with a copy of the Constitution and the preamble to the Declaration of Independence. On our website, you can find the text of the Constitution, as well as quotations about the Constitution and the First Amendment from famous people, and a pathfinder to Constitution resources in the Reference Department.

The schedule of Library Competency Exams for the fall semester has been posted. The first will be on September 26. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam (more information).

General BusinessFile ASAP has been absorbed into Business Insights: Essentials and will no longer be available as a separate database. The links on our website are in the process of being changed.

The printer at the reference desk has been replaced by a new one behind the circulation counter. Make a note of your computer's number, click print, and go to the counter to pick up your pages (do not exit the database until you are sure that your printout is okay). The first 10 pages are free. After that, the cost is 10 cents per page. You can print on only one side of each page. You can also print in color for 25 cents for every page (be sure to select the color printer from the print menu first).

There is now a scanner at the reference desk. You can scan pages from books or other documents and save them to a flash drive or email them to yourself.

On September 26, the Post Library Association will hosting a trip to Sleepy Hollow and Tarrytown: Where the Legend Begins. "The 'Legend of Sleepy Hollow' began almost 200 years ago when Washington Irving wrote about the beautiful valley straddling along the shores of the Hudson River. A short distance outside of New York City, this bus trip will afford the opportunity to view panoramic and scenic vistas of the Hudson River, the Palisades Mountain Range, and the Tappan Zee Bridge. The first stop will be Philipsburg Manor, which was a thriving farming, milling, and trading center during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. A short distance from Philipsburg Manor is the Old Dutch Church of Sleepy Hollow, which has been used since 1609, and the Old Dutch Burying Ground where Ichabod Crane hid from the Headless Horseman. The next stop will be a guided tour of Union Church where we will view the stained glass windows by Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall. After visiting Union Church, we will stop for lunch at Bridge View Tavern, a family owned and operated restaurant. Our last and final visit will be a tour of Sunnyside, the home of Washington Irving who was the author of 'Legend of Sleepy Hollow' and 'Rip van Winkle'." The cost is $95 for OBHA and PLA members and $115 for non-members. Please reserve your place before September 23.

There are three new databases available for your use. International Bibliography of Theatre and Dance with Full Text was initiated by the American Society for Theatre Research and continued, since 1984, by the Theatre Research Data Center (TRDC) at Brooklyn College. It covers all aspects of theatre, dance, and the performing arts in 126 countries. It contains citations to over 60,000 journal articles, books, book chapters, and dissertations along with more than 170 full-text journals and more than 360 full-text books (available for a two month trial). Entertainment Industry Magazine Archive provides the full text of seventeen trade and fan magazines from the years 1880-2000 that cover the history of the film, music, radio, theater, television, and other entertainment industries such as vaudeville, music halls, and circuses. ProQuest Statistical Abstract of the United States is a comprehensive summary of statistics on the social, political, and economic organization of the United States. It includes: monthly updates to tables - deep searching at the line-item level - links to the websites of the data providers - image and spreadsheet versions of all current and historical tables - and powerful facets for narrowing search results by source, data date, subject, and type of data breakdown.



09/08 : Performing Arts & Statistics Databases, Sleepy Hollow Trip, and Holiday Hours
There are three new databases available for your use. International Bibliography of Theatre and Dance with Full Text was initiated by the American Society for Theatre Research and continued, since 1984, by the Theatre Research Data Center (TRDC) at Brooklyn College. It covers all aspects of theatre, dance, and the performing arts in 126 countries. It contains citations to over 60,000 journal articles, books, book chapters, and dissertations along with more than 170 full-text journals and more than 360 full-text books (available for a two month trial). Entertainment Industry Magazine Archive provides the full text of seventeen trade and fan magazines from the years 1880-2000 that cover the history of the film, music, radio, theater, television, and other entertainment industries such as vaudeville, music halls, and circuses. ProQuest Statistical Abstract of the United States is a comprehensive summary of statistics on the social, political, and economic organization of the United States. It includes: monthly updates to tables - deep searching at the line-item level - links to the websites of the data providers - image and spreadsheet versions of all current and historical tables - and powerful facets for narrowing search results by source, data date, subject, and type of data breakdown.

On September 26, the Post Library Association will hosting a trip to Sleepy Hollow and Tarrytown: Where the Legend Begins. "The 'Legend of Sleepy Hollow' began almost 200 years ago when Washington Irving wrote about the beautiful valley straddling along the shores of the Hudson River. A short distance outside of New York City, this bus trip will afford the opportunity to view panoramic and scenic vistas of the Hudson River, the Palisades Mountain Range, and the Tappan Zee Bridge. The first stop will be Philipsburg Manor, which was a thriving farming, milling, and trading center during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. A short distance from Philipsburg Manor is the Old Dutch Church of Sleepy Hollow, which has been used since 1609, and the Old Dutch Burying Ground where Ichabod Crane hid from the Headless Horseman. The next stop will be a guided tour of Union Church where we will view the stained glass windows by Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall. After visiting Union Church, we will stop for lunch at Bridge View Tavern, a family owned and operated restaurant. Our last and final visit will be a tour of Sunnyside, the home of Washington Irving who was the author of 'Legend of Sleepy Hollow' and 'Rip van Winkle'." The cost is $95 for OBHA and PLA members and $115 for non-members. Please reserve your place before September 23.

The holiday hours for the fall semester have been posted.

The printer at the reference desk has been replaced by a new one behind the circulation counter. Make a note of your computer's number, click print, and go to the counter to pick up your pages (do not exit the database until you are sure that your printout is okay). The first 10 pages are free. After that, the cost is 10 cents per page. You can print on only one side of each page. You can also print in color for 25 cents for every page (be sure to select the color printer from the print menu first).

There is now a scanner at the reference desk. You can scan pages from books or other documents and save them to a flash drive or email them to yourself.



09/03 : Welcome Class of 2017 (And Everyone Else Too)
Check back with this page regularly to see announcements about new databases, services, and other library resources as well as news about upcoming exhibits, lectures, and events presented by the library and the Post Library Association. There are also a pages for Frequently Asked Questions (to introduce you to the basics) and Getting Started (to point you to selected resources and LibGuides for various subjects and how to use them) - along with guides to the major citation styles. And you're always welcome to ask a librarian for any help that you might need anytime either in person, over the telephone, through email, online chat, or even text message. You can also Book a Librarian in advance if you'd like a lot of individualized attention.

Your LIU ID card also serves as your library card. Once you get it, bring it to the Circulation Desk to activate your library account so that you can check out books and access the library's over 200 databases from home. In addition to citations, these databases will provide you with the full text of over 46,000 journal, magazine, and newspapers subscriptions, as well as 300 encyclopedias, business financial information, and 74,000 additional ebooks. Returning students should call or visit the Circulation Desk (516-299-2303) because their library accounts may have expired over the summer.

Something new that will be coming soon this semester is that LIU students, faculty, and staff will no longer need a library barcode on their card. The same username and password that you use for your MyLIU and email accounts will also allow you to access the databases. Until then, please continue to use your barcode. Once the new system is in place, you will no longer need to worry about an expired account. Campus computers (and your own computers, tablets, and other handheld devices) that are logged in through the university network won't need a password or barcode. Other categories of users - such as alumni, PLA members, and Brookville Residents - should continue to use their barcode to check out books.

Exhibits currently on display in the library are Eastern and Western Traditional Music, that takes a look at the folk, popular, and classical music of countries around the world, Long Island Photographs, with past and present images by Newsday photographers take us from the Montauk Point lighthouse to New York City's Central Park, A Visual Feast, featuring illustrated books from the library's American Juvenile Collection, and, in honor of Labor Day, posters of movies that portray the business world from our Original Movie Poster Research Collection.

On Friday, the Post Library Association will present John A. Strong, Professor Emeritus at Long Island University, to discuss his latest book, Running on Empty: The Rise and Fall of Southampton College. This "eastern most campus of Long Island University, opened with great promise in 1963 and closed in 2006 amidst great acrimony. Based on extensive interviews of faculty, administrators, students, alumni, and staff, the book is both a celebration of a college beloved by those who were part of the campus community over the years and a cautionary tale of an educational institution struggling to survive without a sufficient endowment. Although forced to close, the campus was a success in many ways. The Marine Science program produced an unprecedented number of Fulbright scholars, the Creative Writing program brought prominent authors to campus, and the Social Science faculty established community outreach programs with the Shinnecock Reservation community. The lecture will delve into the history of the college, the growth and development of a unique campus community in the heart of the Hamptons, and the factors that eventually led to its closing. Copies of the book will be available for purchase at the lecture, and Mr. Strong will sign books following his presentation". Everyone is welcome to this free event that will begin at 8:00pm in the back of Reference commons.

The schedule of Library Competency Exams has not yet been announced. Keep checking this page.

Here's some of what happened while you were away:

The printer at the reference desk has been replaced by a new one behind the circulation counter. Make a note of your computer's number, click print, and go to the counter to pick up your pages (do not exit the database until you are sure that your printout is okay). The first 10 pages are free. After that, the cost is 10 cents per page. You can print on only one side of each page. You can also print in color for 25 cents for every page (be sure to select the color printer from the print menu first).

There is now a scanner at the reference desk. You can scan pages from books or other documents and save them to a flash drive or email them to yourself.

A finding aid for the LIU Post WCWP Radio Station Archives has been compiled and posted by the Archives and Special Collections Department. The impetus to initiate this archive came in 2011 when Art Beltrone, the first director of WCWP, made a generous donation of the first WCWP radio broadcast from October 18, 1961 on reel-to-reel tape (and which you can hear online). The collection makes up part of the Archives of LIU Post / Long Island University, which a includes a complete run of the Pioneer, Opticon, and other publications, as well as videos from LIU's history that feature news coverage, campus events, stage performances, and more.

The Frequently Asked Questions page has been fully updated.

A new database that is now available is Gannett Newsstand Complete that provides the full text of eighty-seven local and regional newspapers.

A new database for teachers and Education students is Kids InfoBits. Designed for students in kindergarten through fifth grade, it features a visually graphic interface, a subject-based topic tree search, and full-text, curriculum-related magazine, newspaper, and reference content on current events, the arts, science, health, people, government, history, sports, and more - including images, maps, flags, seals, charts, and graphs. A Teacher Toolbox includes worksheets that teachers may use in the classroom to teach concepts associated with information seeking, research, and writing, such as judging information, choosing a topic, how to cite a source, organizing a report, and more. It replaces Primary Search, which is no longer available.

A new database for Library Science and Reading students (and any interested others) is Complete Connection. Combining Fiction Connection and Non-Fiction Connection, this readers' advisory tool assists readers in finding book suggestions/recommendations based on the books that they have already read, authors that they already like, and topics that already interest them. Fiction Connection gives readers the option of browsing categories such as genre, setting, character, location and timeframe, while Non-Fiction Connection covers narrative non-fiction books featuring characters, storylines, and dramatic elements. Every query returns suggested titles that each have a "Find Similar" button so that readers never reach a dead end. Book descriptions include enriched content such as reviews, annotations, and first chapters. It also includes the Bowker Reads blog.

Twayne's Authors Online is no longer available, but we still have many other literature databases that provide access to many reference books and journal articles with similar biographical and critical information. The biology databases from ProQuest are no longer available, but biology journals and topics can still be found in the general and health databases. We no longer have access to Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia, but we still do have Britannica Online Academic Edition and almost 300 specialized encyclopedias from the Gale Virtual Reference Library and many other online reference books. Congressional Universe (i.e. CIS: Congressional Information Service) in no longer available, but the Library of Congress' Thomas website provides a similar service.



08/27 : Coming Events and Holiday Hours
This fall, the Instructional Media Center in collaboration with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will be presenting a series of educational technology workshops for Education students and any interested others. The first will be on September 18.

Flyers have been added for the Friday Night Lectures that will be presented by the Post Library Association.

This weekend, the library will be closed from Saturday through Monday. We will be open 9:00-5:00 on Tuesday. Normal hours will begin on September 4.

On Tuesday, there will be a blood drive in Riggs Park from 3:30-8:00. Please donate if you can.



08/26 : Holiday Hours
This weekend, the library will be closed from Saturday through Monday. We will be open 9:00-5:00 on September 3.


08/24 : Saturday and Sunday Downtime
From Facilities Services: There will be an electric shutdown starting at 6:00am on Sunday, August 25th, and ending by 1:00pm that same day. A number of buildings, including the library, will be without normal electric power and will have limited emergency electric power. Other buildings will have normal electric power but will have no air conditioning.

The library will be closed that day, but this will also affect LIUCat and remote access to our databases and online journals, beginning late Saturday afternoon through Monday morning. You will still be able to access some of these things by going directly to http://discovery.lib.liu.edu (this is the "Advanced Search" link after the search boxes on the library homepage). You might want to bookmark that address now just in case the library website is also unavailable. More information.

The biology databases from ProQuest are no longer available and have been removed from our webpages. Biology journals and topics can still be found in the general databases.



08/22 : Sunday Downtime
From Facilities Services: There will be an electric shutdown starting at 6:00am on Sunday, August 25th, and ending by 1:00pm that same day. A number of buildings, including the library, will be without normal electric power and will have limited emergency electric power. Other buildings will have normal electric power but will have no air conditioning.

The library will be closed that day, but this will also affect LIUCat and remote access to our databases and online journals, beginning late Saturday afternoon. You will still be able to access some of these things by going directly to http://discovery.lib.liu.edu (this is the "Advanced Search" link after the search boxes on the library homepage). You might want to bookmark that address now just in case the library website is also unavailable.

The biology databases from ProQuest are no longer available and have been removed from our webpages. Biology journals and topics can still be found in the general databases.



08/19 : Database News and Sunday Downtime
The biology databases from ProQuest are no longer available, and the links are in the process of being removed from our webpages. Biology journals and topics can still be found in the general databases and the broader science databases.

From Facilities Services: There will be an electric shutdown starting at 6:00am on Sunday, August 25th, and ending by 1:00pm that same day. A number of buildings, including the library, will be without normal electric power and will have limited emergency electric power. Fortunately, the library will be closed that day. Other buildings will have normal electric power but will have no air conditioning.



08/14 : Database News, Sunday Hours, and Art Exhibit
The links to U.S. History in Context, World History in Context, and Literature Resource Center have been updated. The biology databases from ProQuest are no longer available, and the links are in the process of being removed from our webpages. Biology journals and topics can still be found in the general databases and the broader science databases.

This Sunday, the library will be open 2:00-6:00.

The new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery is 1010, a group exhibition from the Artist Residency Program of New York, featuring the work of Andy Hwanyoung Jung, Dong Hee Lee, Hui seung Cho, Jehoon Oh, Jeong Min Park, JinKwan Kim, Sohyun An, Song e-Yoon, Wonjun Kim, and Younghak Kim.



08/12 : Art Exhibit and Sunday Hours
The new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery is 1010, a group exhibition from the Artist Residency Program of New York, featuring the work of Andy Hwanyoung Jung, Dong Hee Lee, Hui seung Cho, Jehoon Oh, Jeong Min Park, JinKwan Kim, Sohyun An, Song e-Yoon, Wonjun Kim, and Younghak Kim.

This Sunday, the library will be open 2:00-6:00.



07/29 : Points of View Reference Center
On Thursday, Ebsco will unveil a new user interface for Points of View Reference Center, featuring an updated landing page and improved navigation. It provides essays on controversial issues, presenting multiple sides, along with questions for further thought. Essays are accompanied by relevant periodical and newspaper articles, radio and television news transcripts, primary source documents, biographies, and images.

Also on Thursday, the World Wide Web will be twenty-three years old. The idea for it was first proposed on August 1, 1990. But, by 1993, there were still only fifty web servers in the world. The library's website was created in 1995.

The schedule of events that will be presented this fall by the Post Library Association has been posted. Elsewhere on our website, you can see the list of lectures, exhibits, and other events that will be part of the library's Muslim Journeys from October 7 through November 13.



07/24 : Coming Events and Sunday Hours
The schedule of events that will be presented this fall by the Post Library Association has been posted. Elsewhere on our website, you can see the list of lectures, exhibits, and other events that will be part of the library's Muslim Journeys from October 7 through November 13.

Updated the link to SPIN: Sponsored Program Information Network.

This Sunday, the library will be open 2:00-6:00.



07/22 : Sunday Hours
This Sunday, the library will be open 2:00-6:00.

The new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery is High on Visual Art, featuring the work of Jieun Lee, Youngmi Seo, Jin Cho, Jeong Min Park, You Mee Cho, Darae Jang, June Huh, Garam Lee, Helena Zin Song, Dong Hee Lee, and Yesol Kim. Other exhibits available for viewing in the library are: Eastern and Western Traditional Music which takes a look at the folk, popular, and classical music from many countries around the world; Long Island Photographs with past and present images from Newsday that take us from the Montauk Point lighthouse to New York City's Central Park; A Visual Feast: Illustrated Works from the American Juvenile Collection of children's fiction, folklore, and fairy tales; and Vintage Movie Posters from the Original Movie Poster Research Collection.



07/18 : Art Exhibit
The new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery is High on Visual Art, featuring the work of Jieun Lee, Youngmi Seo, Jin Cho, Jeong Min Park, You Mee Cho, Darae Jang, June Huh, Garam Lee, Helena Zin Song, Dong Hee Lee, and Yesol Kim.

Other exhibits available for viewing in the library are: Eastern and Western Traditional Music which takes a look at the folk, popular, and classical music from many countries around the world; Long Island Photographs with past and present images from Newsday that take us from the Montauk Point lighthouse to New York City's Central Park; A Visual Feast: Illustrated Works from the American Juvenile Collection of children's fiction, folklore, and fairy tales; and Vintage Movie Posters from the Original Movie Poster Research Collection.



07/15 : Blood Drive and Exhibits
On July 16, there will be a blood drive from 11:00-5:00 in the Hillwood Commons Pioneer Room. Please donate if you can. Call 516-299-2800 for more information.

The current exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery is Light and Dream of Korean Art, featuring the work of KIM Yang-Sook, HUH Myoung-Wook, LEE Hyun-Young, CHA Hye-Lim, LEE Kang-Joo, JIN Seong-Mo, YOO Ju-Hee, HAN Hye-Jin, Saya Da JUNG, and PARK Hyun-Ok. Other exhibits available for viewing in the library are: Eastern and Western Traditional Music which takes a look at the folk, popular, and classical music from many countries around the world; Long Island Photographs with past and present images from Newsday that take us from the Montauk Point lighthouse to New York City's Central Park; A Visual Feast: Illustrated Works from the American Juvenile Collection of children's fiction, folklore, and fairy tales; and Vintage Movie Posters from the Original Movie Poster Research Collection.



07/10 : Art Exhibit and Sunday Hours
The new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery is Light and Dream of Korean Art, featuring the work of KIM Yang-Sook, HUH Myoung-Wook, LEE Hyun-Young, CHA Hye-Lim, LEE Kang-Joo, JIN Seong-Mo, YOO Ju-Hee, HAN Hye-Jin, Saya Da JUNG, and PARK Hyun-Ok. Information about the artists' reception will be coming soon.

This Sunday, the library will be open 2:00-6:00.



07/08 : Sunday Hours
This Sunday, the library will be open 2:00-6:00.


07/01 : New Databases, Holiday Hours, and Movie Posters
A new database that is now available is Gannett Newsstand Complete that provides the full text of eighty-seven local and regional newspapers. Another new database is Kids InfoBits. Designed for students in kindergarten through fifth grade, it features a visually graphic interface, a subject-based topic tree search, and full-text, curriculum-related magazine, newspaper, and reference content on current events, the arts, science, health, people, government, history, sports, and more - including images, maps, flags, seals, charts, and graphs. A Teacher Toolbox includes worksheets that teachers may use in the classroom to teach concepts associated with information seeking, research, and writing, such as judging information, choosing a topic, how to cite a source, organizing a report, and more. It replaces Primary Search, which is no longer available. Also no longer available is Twayne's Authors Online, but we still have many other literature databases that provide access to many reference books and journal articles with similar biographical and critical information.

In observance of Independence Day, the library will be closed on Thursday, and the Special Collections Department has placed a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway. These are only a few examples of the over 6,000 posters from 1940 through 1962 in the Original Movie Poster Research Collection. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.



06/25 : Readers' Advisory, Scanning, and Printing
Our newest database for library science students and any interested others is Complete Connection. Combining Fiction Connection and Non-Fiction Connection, this readers' advisory tool assists readers in finding book suggestions/recommendations based on the books that they have already read, authors that they already like, and topics that already interest them. Fiction Connection gives readers the option of browsing categories such as genre, setting, character, location and timeframe, while Non-Fiction Connection covers narrative non-fiction books featuring characters, storylines, and dramatic elements. Every query returns suggested titles that each have a "Find Similar" button so that readers never reach a dead end. Book descriptions include enriched content such as reviews, annotations, and first chapters. Also includes the Bowker Reads blog.

There is now a scanner at the reference desk. You can scan pages from books and other documents and save them to a flash drive. Soon, you will also be able to use it to email the scans to yourself.

The printer at the reference desk is being replaced by a new one behind the circulation counter. If you don't see your print-out at the reference printer, go to the counter (or you can make a note of which printer is being used when you first give the print command). The new printer will also do color. Eventually, the reference desk printer will be removed.



06/17 : Post Library Association
The Post Library Association now has a Facebook page.

The new exhibit in the back of Reference Commons is Long Island Photographs. Past and present images by Newsday photographers take us from the Montauk Point lighthouse to New York City's Central Park, with stops along the way to see parks, gardens, wildlife, Fire Island, snowstorms, Jones Beach, the world series, Levittown in 1947, great white shark hunters, the Westhampton wildfires, the infamous garbage barge, the crash of TWA flight 800, Camp Upton in World War I, traffic on the Long Island Expressway, and much more, featuring such notables as Billy Joel, Marilyn Monroe, Pope John Paul II, William DeKooning, and Martin Luther King Jr.

Other exhibits available for viewing on the main floor are Eastern and Western Traditional Music, which takes a look at the folk, popular, and classical music, opera, ensembles, and especially indigenous instruments of Italy, India, Japan, Spain, China, Korea, Africa, Russia, Arabia, Poland, Ireland, Scotland, Australia, United States, and Latin America and A Visual Feast: Illustrated Works from the American Juvenile Collection of children's fiction, folklore, and fairy tales printed in North America, covering the years 1910-1960 (and some from earlier dates).

Downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery is Diana Conklin's Art Show, featuring landscapes and abstracts. And in the upstairs hallway is Land of the Free, Home of the Brave that showcases four of the 229 posters for war movies that comprise a small part of the Original Movie Poster Research Collection.



06/11 : Sunday Hours
This Sunday, the library will be open 2:00-6:00.

The new exhibit in the back of Reference Commons is Long Island Photographs. Past and present images by Newsday photographers take us from the Montauk Point lighthouse to New York City's Central Park, with stops along the way to see parks, gardens, wildlife, Fire Island, snowstorms, Jones Beach, the world series, Levittown in 1947, great white shark hunters, the Westhampton wildfires, the infamous garbage barge, the crash of TWA flight 800, Camp Upton in World War I, traffic on the Long Island Expressway, and much more, featuring such notables as Billy Joel, Marilyn Monroe, Pope John Paul II, William DeKooning, and Martin Luther King Jr. Other exhibits available for viewing on the main floor are Eastern and Western Traditional Music, which takes a look at the folk, popular, and classical music, opera, ensembles, and especially indigenous instruments of Italy, India, Japan, Spain, China, Korea, Africa, Russia, Arabia, Poland, Ireland, Scotland, Australia, United States, and Latin America and A Visual Feast: Illustrated Works from the American Juvenile Collection of children's fiction, folklore, and fairy tales printed in North America, covering the years 1910-1960 (and some from earlier dates). Downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery is Diana Conklin's Art Show, featuring landscapes and abstracts. And in the upstairs hallway is Land of the Free, Home of the Brave that showcases four of the 229 posters for war movies that comprise a small part of the Original Movie Poster Research Collection.



06/06 : Exhibits (New and Old) and Blood Drive
The new exhibit in the back of Reference Commons is Long Island Photographs. Past and present images by Newsday photographers take us from the Montauk Point lighthouse to New York City's Central Park, with stops along the way to see parks, gardens, wildlife, Fire Island, snowstorms, Jones Beach, the world series, Levittown in 1947, great white shark hunters, the Westhampton wildfires, the infamous garbage barge, the crash of TWA flight 800, Camp Upton in World War I, traffic on the Long Island Expressway, and much more, featuring such notables as Billy Joel, Marilyn Monroe, Pope John Paul II, William DeKooning, and Martin Luther King Jr.

Other exhibits available for viewing on the main floor are Eastern and Western Traditional Music, which takes a look at the folk, popular, and classical music, opera, ensembles, and especially indigenous instruments of Italy, India, Japan, Spain, China, Korea, Africa, Russia, Arabia, Poland, Ireland, Scotland, Australia, United States, and Latin America and A Visual Feast: Illustrated Works from the American Juvenile Collection of children's fiction, folklore, and fairy tales printed in North America, covering the years 1910-1960 (and some from earlier dates). Downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery is Diana Conklin's Art Show, featuring landscapes and abstracts. And in the upstairs hallway is Land of the Free, Home of the Brave that showcases four of the 229 posters for war movies that comprise a small part of the Original Movie Poster Research Collection.

On Tuesday, there will be a Blood Drive in the Hillwood Commons Pioneer Room from 10:00-4:00. Please donate if you can. For more information, call 516-299-2611.



06/03 : Art Exhibit and Reception
On Tuesday evening, there will be an artist's reception for the new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery, Diana Conklin's Art Show, featuring landscapes and abstracts. It will run from 6:00-9:00.


05/28 : Exhibits
The new exhibit in the library lobby is Eastern and Western Traditional Music, which takes a look at the folk, popular, and classical music, opera, ensembles, and especially indigenous instruments of Italy, India, Japan, Spain, China, Korea, Africa, Russia, Arabia, Poland, Ireland, Scotland, Australia, United States, and Latin America.

The Special Collections Department has placed a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway. Land of the Free, Home of the Brave showcases four of the 229 posters for war movies that comprise a small part of their Original Movie Poster Research Collection - a vivid and instructive series of lithograph posters that promote more than 6,000 films produced from 1940 to 1962. Besides the obvious appeal to film students, these posters should be of interest to art majors (who will be stimulated by the varying graphic design approaches), business students, (who will appreciate the marketing effectiveness - or lack thereof - of the differing ways to advertise movies), and other academic disciplines interested in the history of culture and mores. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.



05/23 : Music Exhibit, Email Change, Memorial Day, Movie Posters
The new exhibit in the library lobby is Eastern and Western Traditional Music, which takes a look at the folk, popular, and classical music, opera, ensembles, and especially indigenous instruments of Italy, India, Japan, Spain, China, Korea, Africa, Russia, Arabia, Poland, Ireland, Scotland, Australia, United States, and Latin America.

The Periodicals Department's email address has been changed to Post-Periodicals@liu.edu.

The library will be closed on Monday in observance of Memorial Day.

Also in observance of Memorial Day, the Special Collections Department has placed a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway. Land of the Free, Home of the Brave showcases four of the 229 posters for war movies that comprise a small part of their Original Movie Poster Research Collection - a vivid and instructive series of lithograph posters that promote more than 6,000 films produced from 1940 to 1962. Besides the obvious appeal to film students, these posters should be of interest to art majors (who will be stimulated by the varying graphic design approaches), business students, (who will appreciate the marketing effectiveness - or lack thereof - of the differing ways to advertise movies), and other academic disciplines interested in the history of culture and mores. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.



05/21 : Coming Exhibit & Reception, Fire Alarms, Library Workshop, Business Resources, Holiday Hours
On Wednesday, the fire alarms and smoke detectors in the library will be undergoing their annual test from 7:00-3:00.

Also on Wednesday, section 1 of the Library Competency Workshop will begin at 4:00 in the Library Instruction Lab (LB 220).

On Thursday, the Library Brown Bag series will present Beth Mezick to provide an overview of the business information sources that are available to students in the College of Management (and any interested others) for their assignments, reference questions, and information literacy instruction. It will take place in the Library Instruction Lab at 10:00. Light refreshments will be served, but, in the spirit of a true brown bag, please feel free to bring your breakfast/lunch.

On Thursday, the new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery will feature the MA Thesis Exhibition work of students in the LIU Post Department of Art. The artists' reception will also be on Thursday.

The library will be closed on Monday in observance of Memorial Day.

A finding aid for the LIU Post WCWP Radio Station Archives has been compiled and posted by the Archives and Special Collections Department. The impetus to initiate this archive came in 2011 when Art Beltrone, the first director of WCWP, made a generous donation of the first WCWP radio broadcast from October 18, 1961 on reel-to-reel tape (and which you can hear online). The collection makes up part of the Archives of LIU Post / Long Island University, which a includes a complete run of the Pioneer, Opticon, and other publications, as well as videos from LIU's history that feature news coverage, campus events, stage performances, and more.



05/20 : Business Information Sources and Library Competency Workshop
On Thursday, the Library Brown Bag series will present Beth Mezick to provide an overview of the business information sources that are available to students in the College of Management (and any interested others) for their assignments, reference questions, and information literacy instruction. Light refreshments will be served, but, in the spirit of a true brown bag, please feel free to bring your breakfast/lunch.

Section 1 of the Library Competency Workshop will begin on Wednesday at 4:00 in the Library Instruction Lab (LB 220).

The library will be closed on Monday in observance of Memorial Day.

A finding aid for the LIU Post WCWP Radio Station Archives has been compiled and posted by the Archives and Special Collections Department. The impetus to initiate this archive came in 2011 when Art Beltrone, the first director of WCWP, made a generous donation of the first WCWP radio broadcast from October 18, 1961 on reel-to-reel tape (and which you can hear online). The collection makes up part of the Archives of LIU Post / Long Island University, which a includes a complete run of the Pioneer, Opticon, and other publications, as well as videos from LIU's history that feature news coverage, campus events, stage performances, and more.



05/16 : Radio Archives, Library Competency Workshop, and Library Hours
A finding aid for the LIU Post WCWP Radio Station Archives has been compiled and posted by the Archives and Special Collections Department. The impetus to initiate this archive came in 2011 when Art Beltrone, the first director of WCWP, made a generous donation of the first WCWP radio broadcast from October 18, 1961 on reel-to-reel tape (and which you can hear online). The collection makes up part of the Archives of LIU Post / Long Island University, which a includes a complete run of the Pioneer, Opticon, and other publications, as well as videos from LIU's history that feature news coverage, campus events, stage performances, and more.

The schedule of Library Competency Workshops for the summer and fall semesters has been posted. Section 1 will begin on Wednesday at 4:00 in the Library Instruction Lab (LB 220).

The library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Friday and open 9:00-4:00 on Saturday. We will be closed on Sunday. Normal summer hours will begin on Monday. The Bookmark Café will be closed until the fall.



05/15 : Library Hours and Blackboard Downtime
The library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Thursday-Friday and open 9:00-4:00 on Saturday. We will be closed on Sunday. Normal summer hours will begin on Monday. The Bookmark Café will be closed until the fall. The summer holiday hours have also been posted.

From information technology: "On Thursday, May 16, from 9 am to 12 noon, LIU's Blackboard environment will be unavailable in order for system upgrades to be performed. We anticipate this maintenance and application upgrade to be complete by noon on May 16th. Reminders will be posted in the Blackboard environment to all instructors and students on the days leading up to May 16th. New features made available to you and your students include social networking integration to which students may opt in, an enhanced calendar feature that consolidates events from one's personal, course-related and institutional calendars, and updated features to the discussion tool. We believe you will also welcome changes to grading and assessments with inline assignment grading (no more downloading!), additional test configuration choices, and filters for finding and grading course artifacts. We welcome these improvements and will be posting updated tutorials to IT.LIU.edu as well as offering scheduled workshops at the Brooklyn and Post campuses. If you have questions, please contact your local Information Technology office. Thank you in advance for your cooperation."



05/13 : Art Exhibit, Artists' Reception, and Library Hours
The new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery features the M.A. Thesis Work of Angela Liotta, Tara Ramsey, Silvia Kan, and Nancy Wong. The artists' reception will be on Wednesday from 6:00-9:00 p.m.

The library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Monday-Friday and open 9:00-4:00 on Saturday. We will be closed on Sunday. Normal summer hours will begin on Monday. The Bookmark Café will be closed until the fall.

From information technology: "On Thursday, May 16, from 9 am to 12 noon, LIU's Blackboard environment will be unavailable in order for system upgrades to be performed. We anticipate this maintenance and application upgrade to be complete by noon on May 16th. Reminders will be posted in the Blackboard environment to all instructors and students on the days leading up to May 16th. New features made available to you and your students include social networking integration to which students may opt in, an enhanced calendar feature that consolidates events from one's personal, course-related and institutional calendars, and updated features to the discussion tool. We believe you will also welcome changes to grading and assessments with inline assignment grading (no more downloading!), additional test configuration choices, and filters for finding and grading course artifacts. We welcome these improvements and will be posting updated tutorials to IT.LIU.edu as well as offering scheduled workshops at the Brooklyn and Post campuses. If you have questions, please contact your local Information Technology office. Thank you in advance for your cooperation."



05/10 : Congratulations Graduates!
The library will be open 8:00-2:00 on Friday and open 8:00-5:00 on Saturday. We will be closed on Sunday and open 9:00-5:00 all next week. The Bookmark Café will be closed until the fall.


05/08 : Library Hours
On Thursday, the library will close at 9:00 after the last exam in the building has been completed. We will be open 8:00-2:00 on Friday and open 8:00-5:00 on Saturday. We will be closed on Sunday and open 9:00-5:00 all next week.

The email address for Library Instruction services has been changed to Post-LIRequest@liu.edu.

More examples for websites have been added to the guide to Chicago Citation Style's 16th edition.



05/05 : Extended Hours and Chicago Citations
The library currently has extended hours for finals exams. Reference Commons will be open until midnight on Sunday and open until 1:00am on Monday-Wednesday. If you need someplace else to study when we are closed, Hillwood Commons stays open until midnight every day, and the Interfaith Center lounge usually stays open all night once finals begin (more information about that once it has been officially announced). A PDF of the finals schedule is available on the campus website.

Examples for websites have started to be added to the guide to Chicago Citation Style's 16th edition.

On Thursday, the library will close after the last exam in the building has been completed, possibly around 10:00. We will be open 8:00-2:00 on Friday and open 8:00-5:00 on Saturday.



04/30 : Extended Hours
The library currently has extended hours for finals exams. Reference Commons will be open until 1:00am on Monday-Thursday and open until midnight on Sunday. We will be open normal hours, 8:00-5:00, on Friday and Saturday. If you need someplace else to study when we are closed, Hillwood Commons stays open until midnight every day, and the Interfaith Center lounge usually stays open all night once finals begin (more information about that once it has been officially announced). A PDF of the finals schedule is available on the campus website.


04/28 : Lincoln's Speeches and Extended Hours
On Monday, the Instructional Media Center and the Post Library Association will present the last in a series of weekly readings and discussions facilitated by James Coll, Reading Between the Lines: Lincoln on the Civil War. "This series will allow participants to examine and appreciate anew the rhetoric, political skill, and moral transformation of the sixteenth president. His words are a window into the mind of a canny politician and deep thinker considering the central questions of the Civil War era: the nature of democratic participation - how to navigate the turbulent partisanship and regionalism of the antebellum era - the secession crisis and outbreak of civil war - the meaning of the nation's bloodiest conflict - and, finally, the task of 'binding up the nation's wounds' and protecting the newly won citizenship of African Americans at the close of the war. The book, Lincoln on the Civil War: Selected Speeches, includes nine of the sixteenth president's most stirring addresses on issues of freedom, civic duty, slavery, and the Constitution. The addresses include his early 1838 speech 'Address to the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois', his famous 'House Divided' and Cooper-Union speeches, as well as signal wartime addresses." Everyone is welcome to this free event, presented with the support of a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities, that will take place in the Hutchins Gallery at 2:00. It accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

On Monday evening, the library will begin extended hours for finals exams. Reference Commons will be open until 1:00am on Monday-Thursday and open until midnight on Sunday. We will be open normal hours, 8:00-5:00, on Friday and Saturday. If you need someplace else to study when we are closed, Hillwood Commons stays open until midnight every day, and the Interfaith Center lounge usually stays open all night once finals begin (more information about that once it has been officially announced). A PDF of the finals schedule is available on the campus website.

The Special Collections Department has placed a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway highlighting baseball movies in Let's Go out to the Ballgame. These four films comprise a small part of their Original Movie Poster Research Collection - a vivid and instructive series of lithograph posters that promote more than 6,000 films produced from 1940 to 1962. Besides the obvious appeal to film students, these posters should be of interest to art majors (who will be stimulated by the varying graphic design approaches), business students, (who will appreciate the marketing effectiveness - or lack thereof - of the differing ways to advertise movies), and other academic disciplines interested in the history of culture and mores. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.



04/25 : Lincoln Concert & Poetry, Citing Blogs, Lincoln's Speeches, Extended Hours
On Saturday, the library and LICA (the Long Island Composers Alliance) will present a concert with readings of Lincoln Poetry and Music by Long Islanders. Participants will include Lincoln scholar and philanthropist Lewis E. Lehrman. Featured poets will be Jud Newborn, George Wallace, and Maxwell Corydon Wheat, Jr. Featured composers will be Leonard Lehrman, Herbert Feldman, Herbert Rothgarber, Marga Richter, Julie Mandel, Patricia King, and Jane Leslie, with works performed by the Metropolitan Philharmonic Chorus - with soloists Helene Williams and Pamela Jusino - accompanied and conducted by Leonard Lehrman. This concert is free and open to the public and will begin at 3:00 in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall. It accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

Examples for blogs have been added to the guide to the Chicago Citation Style's 16th edition.

On Monday, the Instructional Media Center and the Post Library Association will present the last in a series of weekly readings and discussions facilitated by James Coll, Reading Between the Lines: Lincoln on the Civil War. "This series will allow participants to examine and appreciate anew the rhetoric, political skill, and moral transformation of the sixteenth president. His words are a window into the mind of a canny politician and deep thinker considering the central questions of the Civil War era: the nature of democratic participation - how to navigate the turbulent partisanship and regionalism of the antebellum era - the secession crisis and outbreak of civil war - the meaning of the nation's bloodiest conflict - and, finally, the task of 'binding up the nation's wounds' and protecting the newly won citizenship of African Americans at the close of the war. The book, Lincoln on the Civil War: Selected Speeches, includes nine of the sixteenth president's most stirring addresses on issues of freedom, civic duty, slavery, and the Constitution. The addresses include his early 1838 speech 'Address to the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois', his famous 'House Divided' and Cooper-Union speeches, as well as signal wartime addresses." Everyone is welcome to this free event, presented with the support of a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities, that will take place in the Hutchins Gallery at 2:00. It accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

On Monday evening, the library will begin extended hours for finals exams. Reference Commons will be open until 1:00am on Monday-Thursday and open until midnight on Sunday. We will be open normal hours, 8:00-5:00, on Friday and Saturday. If you need someplace else to study when we are closed, Hillwood Commons stays open until midnight every day, and the Interfaith Center lounge usually stays open all night once finals begin (more information about that once it has been officially announced). A PDF of the finals schedule is available on the campus website.



04/22 : Booksale Cancellation, Art Database, Citation Style, Extended Hours, Lincoln Concert, Poetry & Speeches
A new database that we have for a very brief trial period is Artists of the World Online. This German language database contains authoritative, up-to-date biographical information on more than one million artists from antiquity to the present and from every country in the world. It covers the visual arts in the broadest sense: artisans, painters, sculptors, designers, architects, video artists, graphic artists, photographers, installation artists, and many others. Each article also provides information on the artist's creative work and his or her historical significance, as well as a selection of works with their locations, details of exhibitions, and an extensive bibliography.

This year's spring PLA Booksale has been cancelled.

Examples for magazine articles have been added to the guide to the Chicago Citation Style's 16th edition.

On Wednesday, in response to the many requests for help with citing sources using the APA, MLA, or Chicago citation styles, the library will be holding a one hour Styling Time! workshop in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220) at 12:30. Students are encouraged to bring their lists of sources to get hands-on help with citing them.

On Saturday, the library and LICA (the Long Island Composers Alliance) will present a concert with readings of Lincoln Poetry and Music by Long Islanders. Participants will include Lincoln scholar and philanthropist Lewis E. Lehrman. Featured poets will be Jud Newborn, George Wallace, and Maxwell Corydon Wheat, Jr. Featured composers will be Leonard Lehrman, Herbert Feldman, Herbert Rothgarber, Marga Richter, Julie Mandel, Patricia King, and Jane Leslie, with works performed by the Metropolitan Philharmonic Chorus - with soloists Helene Williams and Pamela Jusino - accompanied and conducted by Leonard Lehrman. This concert is free and open to the public and will begin at 3:00 in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall. It accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

On Monday, the Instructional Media Center and the Post Library Association will present the last in a series of weekly readings and discussions facilitated by James Coll, Reading Between the Lines: Lincoln on the Civil War. "This series will allow participants to examine and appreciate anew the rhetoric, political skill, and moral transformation of the sixteenth president. His words are a window into the mind of a canny politician and deep thinker considering the central questions of the Civil War era: the nature of democratic participation - how to navigate the turbulent partisanship and regionalism of the antebellum era - the secession crisis and outbreak of civil war - the meaning of the nation's bloodiest conflict - and, finally, the task of 'binding up the nation's wounds' and protecting the newly won citizenship of African Americans at the close of the war. The book, Lincoln on the Civil War: Selected Speeches, includes nine of the sixteenth president's most stirring addresses on issues of freedom, civic duty, slavery, and the Constitution. The addresses include his early 1838 speech 'Address to the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois', his famous 'House Divided' and Cooper-Union speeches, as well as signal wartime addresses." Everyone is welcome to this free event, presented with the support of a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities, that will take place in the Hutchins Gallery at 2:00. It accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

On Monday evening, the library will begin extended hours for finals exams. Reference Commons will be open until 1:00am on Monday-Thursday and open until midnight on Sunday. We will be open normal hours, 8:00-5:00, on Friday and Saturday. If you need someplace else to study when we are closed, Hillwood Commons stays open until midnight every day, and the Interfaith Center lounge usually stays open all night once finals begin (more information about that once it has been officially announced). A PDF of the finals schedule is available on the campus website.



04/17 : Citation Style, Lincoln on Film, Lincoln's Speeches, Blood Drive, and Booksale
A section on how to cite company and industry reports from the Hoovers, Mergent, Value Line, and similar databases has been added to the guide to APA citation style (scroll down a bit when you get there).

On Monday, in response to the many requests for help with citing sources using the APA, MLA, or Chicago citation styles, the library will be holding a one hour Styling Time! workshop in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220) at 12:30. Students are encouraged to bring their lists of sources to get hands-on help with citing them. Another workshop will be on Wednesday. The same material will be covered in each session.

Also on Monday, Philip Harwood will present the lecture, Abraham Lincoln on Film. "Professor Harwood is a film historian and graduate of Hofstra University. He has lectured at Queens College, the New School for Social Research, Hofstra University, and at LIU Post (Hutton House Lectures). He also lectures all over Long Island and is a published author. Professor Harwood writes film music reviews for Cinema Concerto and is the Audio Director of the International Al Jolson Society." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place at 12:30 in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall. The lecture accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

Yet again on Monday, the Instructional Media Center and the Post Library Association will present the third in a series of weekly readings and discussions facilitated by James Coll, Reading Between the Lines: Lincoln on the Civil War. "This series will allow participants to examine and appreciate anew the rhetoric, political skill, and moral transformation of the sixteenth president. His words are a window into the mind of a canny politician and deep thinker considering the central questions of the Civil War era: the nature of democratic participation - how to navigate the turbulent partisanship and regionalism of the antebellum era - the secession crisis and outbreak of civil war - the meaning of the nation's bloodiest conflict - and, finally, the task of 'binding up the nation's wounds' and protecting the newly won citizenship of African Americans at the close of the war. The book, Lincoln on the Civil War: Selected Speeches, includes nine of the sixteenth president's most stirring addresses on issues of freedom, civic duty, slavery, and the Constitution. The addresses include his early 1838 speech 'Address to the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois', his famous 'House Divided' and Cooper-Union speeches, as well as signal wartime addresses." Everyone is welcome to this free event, presented with the support of a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities, that will take place in the Hutchins Gallery at 2:00. It accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

Another yet again on Monday, there will be a blood drive in the Hillwood Commons Pioneer Room from 10:00-4:00. Please donate if you can.

On Tuesday, the PLA Spring Book Sale will begin and will be open only to the LIU community and Post Library Association members. On Wednesday, it will be open to everybody. It will run from 10:00-6:00 on both days. Sale items will include books and miscellaneous media items.

The ARTstor Digital Library has changed the way that it works: "This upgrade will eliminate the need for Java in the ARTstor Digital Library and single image downloads will be delivered in Zip files. Many versions of Windows come equipped with a built in zip program, but if you need to install a program on your PC, ARTstor recommends 7-Zip, available free at 7-zip.org. Mac users will not need to install software to handle zip files as it is already built into OS X. If you experience any difficulties, please clear the cache on your browser and restart your Web browser. If you continue to experience difficulties, please do not hesitate to contact User Services at userservices@artstor.org."



04/16 : Party on the Porch, Special Education, Hours, Competency Exam, Citation Style, Lincoln Events, Booksale
On Wednesday, the Library Liaison Committee will be hosting a Spring Party on the Porch of the library during the common hour (12:30-1:30). There will be a light food and drinks buffet, as well as live music featuring the LIU Post Jazz Combo under the direction of T.K. Blue. All students, faculty, and staff are welcome to this simple social gathering and chance to enjoy the (hopefully) sunny spring weather. We hope that you can attend. No RSVP is required. In the event of rain, the party will take place in the Library Instruction Lab and the library lobby.

The pathfinder for Special Education Resources has been updated. It includes many general education resources too. This is only one of the many guides that can help you to get started with your research.

The date that extended hours for final exams will begin has been moved back a week to April 29.

On Wednesday, the last Library Competency Exam of the semester will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

On Monday, in response to the many requests for help with citing sources using the APA, MLA, or Chicago citation styles, the library will be holding a one hour Styling Time! workshop in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220) at 12:30. Students are encouraged to bring their lists of sources to get hands-on help with citing them. Another workshop will be on April 24. The same material will be covered in each session.

Also on Monday, Philip Harwood will present the lecture, Abraham Lincoln on Film. "Professor Harwood is a film historian and graduate of Hofstra University. He has lectured at Queens College, the New School for Social Research, Hofstra University, and at LIU Post (Hutton House Lectures). He also lectures all over Long Island and is a published author. Professor Harwood writes film music reviews for Cinema Concerto and is the Audio Director of the International Al Jolson Society." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place at 12:30 in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall. The lecture accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

Yet again on Monday, the Instructional Media Center and the Post Library Association will present the third in a series of weekly readings and discussions facilitated by James Coll, Reading Between the Lines: Lincoln on the Civil War. "This series will allow participants to examine and appreciate anew the rhetoric, political skill, and moral transformation of the sixteenth president. His words are a window into the mind of a canny politician and deep thinker considering the central questions of the Civil War era: the nature of democratic participation - how to navigate the turbulent partisanship and regionalism of the antebellum era - the secession crisis and outbreak of civil war - the meaning of the nation's bloodiest conflict - and, finally, the task of 'binding up the nation's wounds' and protecting the newly won citizenship of African Americans at the close of the war. The book, Lincoln on the Civil War: Selected Speeches, includes nine of the sixteenth president's most stirring addresses on issues of freedom, civic duty, slavery, and the Constitution. The addresses include his early 1838 speech 'Address to the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois', his famous 'House Divided' and Cooper-Union speeches, as well as signal wartime addresses." Everyone is welcome to this free event, presented with the support of a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities, that will take place in the Hutchins Gallery at 2:00. It accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

Next Tuesday will begin the PLA Spring Book Sale that will be open only to the LIU community and Post Library Association members. On Wednesday, it will be open to everybody. It will run from 10:00-6:00 on both days. Sale items will include books and miscellaneous media items.

The ARTstor Digital Library has changed the way that it works: "This upgrade will eliminate the need for Java in the ARTstor Digital Library and single image downloads will be delivered in Zip files. Many versions of Windows come equipped with a built in zip program, but if you need to install a program on your PC, ARTstor recommends 7-Zip, available free at 7-zip.org. Mac users will not need to install software to handle zip files as it is already built into OS X. If you experience any difficulties, please clear the cache on your browser and restart your Web browser. If you continue to experience difficulties, please do not hesitate to contact User Services at userservices@artstor.org."



04/14 : Lincoln's Speeches, ARTstor news, Google Earth, Competency Exam, Party on the Porch
On Monday, the Instructional Media Center and the Post Library Association will present the second in a series of weekly readings and discussions facilitated by James Coll, Reading Between the Lines: Lincoln on the Civil War. "This series will allow participants to examine and appreciate anew the rhetoric, political skill, and moral transformation of the sixteenth president. His words are a window into the mind of a canny politician and deep thinker considering the central questions of the Civil War era: the nature of democratic participation - how to navigate the turbulent partisanship and regionalism of the antebellum era - the secession crisis and outbreak of civil war - the meaning of the nation's bloodiest conflict - and, finally, the task of 'binding up the nation's wounds' and protecting the newly won citizenship of African Americans at the close of the war. The book, Lincoln on the Civil War: Selected Speeches, includes nine of the sixteenth president's most stirring addresses on issues of freedom, civic duty, slavery, and the Constitution. The addresses include his early 1838 speech 'Address to the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois', his famous 'House Divided' and Cooper-Union speeches, as well as signal wartime addresses." Everyone is welcome to this free event, presented with the support of a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities, that will take place in the Hutchins Gallery at 2:00. It accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

On Tuesday, the ARTstor Digital Library will be changing the way it works: "Please be advised that we will be performing an upgrade to the ARTstor Digital Library on Tuesday, April 16th between 6:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. During this time, users will be able to access the Digital Library but may experience some slowness. This upgrade will eliminate the need for Java in the ARTstor Digital Library and single image downloads will be delivered in Zip files. Many versions of Windows come equipped with a built in zip program, but if you need to install a program on your PC, ARTstor recommends 7-Zip, available free at 7-zip.org. Mac users will not need to install software to handle zip files as it is already built into OS X. If you experience any difficulties, please clear the cache on your browser and restart your Web browser. If you continue to experience difficulties, please do not hesitate to contact User Services at userservices@artstor.org."

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Google Earth Basics. "Google Earth is used by educators across the curriculum in language arts, social studies, math, and science. Google Earth is a virtual interactive globe that enables you to find and explore just about any location in the world. You can discover the earth, explore the sky, or dive into the ocean as never before. In this session, you will learn basic navigation skills and create a tour of your favorite destinations using custom placemarks, photographs, image overlays, and voice narration." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Wednesday, the last Library Competency Exam of the semester will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

Also on Wednesday, the Library Liaison Committee will be hosting a Spring Party on the Porch of the library during the common hour (12:30-1:30). There will be a light food and drinks buffet, as well as live music featuring the LIU Post Jazz Combo under the direction of T.K. Blue. All students, faculty, and staff are welcome to this simple social gathering and chance to enjoy the (hopefully) sunny spring weather. We hope that you can attend. No RSVP is required. In the event of rain, the party will take place in the Library Instruction Lab and the library lobby.

Our newest database is the return of the Mental Measurements Yearbook with Tests in Print that provides users with a comprehensive guide to over 7,000 testing instruments. It contains information essential for a complete evaluation of test products within such diverse areas as psychology, education, business, and leadership. Coverage now extends all the way back to the first volume from 1938. The Tests in Print component serves as a bibliography of all known commercially available tests. It includes test purpose, test publisher, in-print status, price, test acronym, intended test population, administration times, publication date, and test author.

The SRDS: Standard Rate and Data Service redesigned its website without telling us. So if you were having trouble trying to access it from off campus recently, this was the reason why. All of the links on our site have been updated.



04/11 : Life of a Chef Lecture, MMY & SRDS Databases, Competency Exam, Lincoln's Speeches, Google Earth, Party
On Friday evening, the Post Library Association will present The Life of a Chef: 40 Years of Kitchen Lore and Quirky Stories. "Arno Schmidt will discuss his autobiography, Peeking Behind the Wallpaper, and the gilded age of hotel dining from his experiences as a chef at both the Waldorf-Astoria and The Plaza Hotel. In 1946, Arno began his apprenticeship in war-torn Austria and, after an odyssey through kitchens in many countries, became Executive Chef of the Waldorf-Astoria. During the Bicentennial, he supervised meals for the most powerful people in the world. The book is about glorious hotel dining and memorable banquets - including menus and kitchen work sheets. There are vignettes about accounting follies, catering directors, kosher caterers, and managers. There are quirky stories about captains, waiters, and cooks. The book looks into the kitchen of the St. Regis Hotel when it was still owned by Mrs. Astor, with menus from the legendary Maisonette and King Cole Bar. There are Plaza menus from 1928, stories about holidays in hotels, and permanent residents. There is advice about cooking and long forgotten classical dishes such as terrapin and Crabmeat Remick." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place in the library's Reference Commons at 8:00 p.m.

Our newest database is the return of the Mental Measurements Yearbook with Tests in Print that provides users with a comprehensive guide to over 7,000 testing instruments. It contains information essential for a complete evaluation of test products within such diverse areas as psychology, education, business, and leadership. Coverage now extends all the way back to the first volume from 1938. The Tests in Print component serves as a bibliography of all known commercially available tests. It includes test purpose, test publisher, in-print status, price, test acronym, intended test population, administration times, publication date, and test author.

The SRDS: Standard Rate and Data Service redesigned its website without telling us. So if you were having trouble trying to access it from off campus recently, this was the reason why. All of the links on our site have been updated.

Examples for newspaper articles have been added to the guide to the Chicago Citation Style's 16th edition.

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead. The last exam of the semester will be on Wednesday (registration instructions and more information).

On Monday, the Instructional Media Center and the Post Library Association will present the second in a series of weekly readings and discussions facilitated by James Coll, Reading Between the Lines: Lincoln on the Civil War. "This series will allow participants to examine and appreciate anew the rhetoric, political skill, and moral transformation of the sixteenth president. His words are a window into the mind of a canny politician and deep thinker considering the central questions of the Civil War era: the nature of democratic participation - how to navigate the turbulent partisanship and regionalism of the antebellum era - the secession crisis and outbreak of civil war - the meaning of the nation's bloodiest conflict - and, finally, the task of 'binding up the nation's wounds' and protecting the newly won citizenship of African Americans at the close of the war. The book, Lincoln on the Civil War: Selected Speeches, includes nine of the sixteenth president's most stirring addresses on issues of freedom, civic duty, slavery, and the Constitution. The addresses include his early 1838 speech 'Address to the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois', his famous 'House Divided' and Cooper-Union speeches, as well as signal wartime addresses." Everyone is welcome to this free event, presented with the support of a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities, that will take place in the Hutchins Gallery at 2:00. It accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Google Earth Basics. "Google Earth is used by educators across the curriculum in language arts, social studies, math, and science. Google Earth is a virtual interactive globe that enables you to find and explore just about any location in the world. You can discover the earth, explore the sky, or dive into the ocean as never before. In this session, you will learn basic navigation skills and create a tour of your favorite destinations using custom placemarks, photographs, image overlays, and voice narration." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Wednesday, the last Library Competency Exam of the semester will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

Also on Wednesday, the Library Liaison Committee will be hosting a Spring Party on the Porch of the library during the common hour (12:30-1:30). There will be a light food and drinks buffet, as well as live music featuring the LIU Post Jazz Combo under the direction of T.K. Blue. All students, faculty, and staff are welcome to this simple social gathering and chance to enjoy the (hopefully) sunny spring weather. We hope that you can attend. No RSVP is required. In the event of rain, the party will take place in the Library Instruction Lab and the library lobby.



04/09 : Zoho & Google Earth Workshops, Competency Exam, Life of a Chef Lecture, Lincoln's Speeches
On Wednesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Zoho Basics: Going Beyond Microsoft Office. "Microsoft Office Suite not available? No need to panic, just use Zoho! Zoho's online content sharing and group collaboration allows students and teachers to stay connected beyond the classroom. Zoho's Wiki enables educators to create interactive course content. Zoho's Challenge allows teachers to create tests and quizzes with a variety of question types. Zoho is compatible with Microsoft Office - work online and upload Microsoft Office documents into Zoho, or work offline and open Zoho documents in Microsoft Office." It will run from 5:00-6:15 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead. The last exam of the semester will be on April 17 (registration instructions and more information).

On Friday evening, the Post Library Association will present The Life of a Chef: 40 Years of Kitchen Lore and Quirky Stories. "Arno Schmidt will discuss his autobiography, Peeking Behind the Wallpaper, and the gilded age of hotel dining from his experiences as a chef at both the Waldorf-Astoria and The Plaza Hotel. In 1946, Arno began his apprenticeship in war-torn Austria and, after an odyssey through kitchens in many countries, became Executive Chef of the Waldorf-Astoria. During the Bicentennial, he supervised meals for the most powerful people in the world. The book is about glorious hotel dining and memorable banquets - including menus and kitchen work sheets. There are vignettes about accounting follies, catering directors, kosher caterers, and managers. There are quirky stories about captains, waiters, and cooks. The book looks into the kitchen of the St. Regis Hotel when it was still owned by Mrs. Astor, with menus from the legendary Maisonette and King Cole Bar. There are Plaza menus from 1928, stories about holidays in hotels, and permanent residents. There is advice about cooking and long forgotten classical dishes such as terrapin and Crabmeat Remick." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place in the library's Reference Commons at 8:00 p.m.

On Monday, the Instructional Media Center and the Post Library Association will present the second in a series of weekly readings and discussions facilitated by James Coll, Reading Between the Lines: Lincoln on the Civil War. "This series will allow participants to examine and appreciate anew the rhetoric, political skill, and moral transformation of the sixteenth president. His words are a window into the mind of a canny politician and deep thinker considering the central questions of the Civil War era: the nature of democratic participation - how to navigate the turbulent partisanship and regionalism of the antebellum era - the secession crisis and outbreak of civil war - the meaning of the nation's bloodiest conflict - and, finally, the task of 'binding up the nation's wounds' and protecting the newly won citizenship of African Americans at the close of the war. The book, Lincoln on the Civil War: Selected Speeches, includes nine of the sixteenth president's most stirring addresses on issues of freedom, civic duty, slavery, and the Constitution. The addresses include his early 1838 speech 'Address to the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois', his famous 'House Divided' and Cooper-Union speeches, as well as signal wartime addresses." Everyone is welcome to this free event, presented with the support of a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities, that will take place in the Hutchins Gallery at 2:00. It accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Google Earth Basics. "Google Earth is used by educators across the curriculum in language arts, social studies, math, and science. Google Earth is a virtual interactive globe that enables you to find and explore just about any location in the world. You can discover the earth, explore the sky, or dive into the ocean as never before. In this session, you will learn basic navigation skills and create a tour of your favorite destinations using custom placemarks, photographs, image overlays, and voice narration." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.



04/07 : Lincoln's Speeches & Funeral, Zoho Workshop, Competency Exam, and Life of a Chef
On Monday, the Instructional Media Center and the Post Library Association will present the first in a series of weekly readings and discussions facilitated by James Coll, Reading Between the Lines: Lincoln on the Civil War. "This series will allow participants to examine and appreciate anew the rhetoric, political skill, and moral transformation of the sixteenth president. His words are a window into the mind of a canny politician and deep thinker considering the central questions of the Civil War era: the nature of democratic participation - how to navigate the turbulent partisanship and regionalism of the antebellum era - the secession crisis and outbreak of civil war - the meaning of the nation's bloodiest conflict - and, finally, the task of 'binding up the nation's wounds' and protecting the newly won citizenship of African Americans at the close of the war. The book, Lincoln on the Civil War: Selected Speeches, includes nine of the sixteenth president's most stirring addresses on issues of freedom, civic duty, slavery, and the Constitution. The addresses include his early 1838 speech 'Address to the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois', his famous 'House Divided' and Cooper-Union speeches, as well as signal wartime addresses." Everyone is welcome to this free event, presented with the support of a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities, that will take place in the Hutchins Gallery at 2:00. It accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

On Tuesday, lecturer Richard Sloan will be on hand for You Are There at Lincoln's New York City Funeral, "a unique multi-media presentation that transports the audience back in time to April 1865 and makes them eyewitnesses to this great and sad event. This is accomplished by converting contemporary newspaper reports into the present tense and showing old photos, prints, and woodcuts. Sound effects and modern recordings of music heard during the funeral procession and the lying in state at City Hall help cement the mood. Following the presentation, Mr. Sloan will show some of the sites along the route of the procession as they appeared in 1865 and as they appear today. Ironically, many of them have interesting connections to Lincoln, Mrs. Lincoln, and John Wilkes Booth." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place at 12:30 in the Hillwood Commons Cinema. It accompanies our current exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

On Wednesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Zoho Basics: Going Beyond Microsoft Office. "Microsoft Office Suite not available? No need to panic, just use Zoho! Zoho's online content sharing and group collaboration allows students and teachers to stay connected beyond the classroom. Zoho's Wiki enables educators to create interactive course content. Zoho's Challenge allows teachers to create tests and quizzes with a variety of question types. Zoho is compatible with Microsoft Office - work online and upload Microsoft Office documents into Zoho, or work offline and open Zoho documents in Microsoft Office." It will run from 5:00-6:15 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead. The last exam of the semester will be on April 17 (registration instructions and more information).

On Friday evening, the Post Library Association will present The Life of a Chef: 40 Years of Kitchen Lore and Quirky Stories. "Arno Schmidt will discuss his autobiography, Peeking Behind the Wallpaper, and the gilded age of hotel dining from his experiences as a chef at both the Waldorf-Astoria and The Plaza Hotel. In 1946, Arno began his apprenticeship in war-torn Austria and, after an odyssey through kitchens in many countries, became Executive Chef of the Waldorf-Astoria. During the Bicentennial, he supervised meals for the most powerful people in the world. The book is about glorious hotel dining and memorable banquets - including menus and kitchen work sheets. There are vignettes about accounting follies, catering directors, kosher caterers, and managers. There are quirky stories about captains, waiters, and cooks. The book looks into the kitchen of the St. Regis Hotel when it was still owned by Mrs. Astor, with menus from the legendary Maisonette and King Cole Bar. There are Plaza menus from 1928, stories about holidays in hotels, and permanent residents. There is advice about cooking and long forgotten classical dishes such as terrapin and Crabmeat Remick." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place in the library's Reference Commons at 8:00 p.m.

All of the 2012 postings to this page have been archived for posterity.



04/03 : Marian Anderson Lecture - Lincoln Film, Readings & Funeral - Educational Technology
On Thursday, Marc Courtade will present the lecture, The Legacy of Marian Anderson, at 12:30 in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall. "Marian Anderson was one of the most celebrated singers of the twentieth century. She became an important figure in the struggle for black artists to overcome racial prejudice in the United States during the mid-twentieth century. In 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution refused permission for Anderson to sing to an integrated audience in Constitution Hall. Instead, with the aid of Eleanor Roosevelt, Anderson performed a critically acclaimed open-air concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939. She sang before a crowd of more than 75,000 people and a radio audience in the millions. In 1955, Anderson broke the color barrier by becoming the first African-American to perform with the Metropolitan Opera. In 1958 she was officially designated delegate to the United Nations, a formalization of her role as 'goodwill ambassador' of the U.S., and in 1972 she was awarded the UN Peace Prize. Anderson may have been a reluctant participant in the civil rights movement, but greatness was thrust upon her. A generation of African-American singers is indebted to her for blazing the trail towards equality." Everyone is welcome to this free event that accompanies our exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

On Friday at noon, one of our partners for this exhibit, the Port Washington Public Library, will present the film, Young Mr. Lincoln. Professor Philip Harwood will be there to introduce and discuss this classic film about Lincoln's early years before its screening and to answer your questions after.

On Monday, the Instructional Media Center and the Post Library Association will present the first in a series of weekly readings and discussions facilitated by James Coll, Reading Between the Lines: Lincoln on the Civil War. "This series will allow participants to examine and appreciate anew the rhetoric, political skill, and moral transformation of the sixteenth president. His words are a window into the mind of a canny politician and deep thinker considering the central questions of Civil War era: the nature of democratic participation; how to navigate the turbulent partisanship and regionalism of the antebellum era; the secession crisis and outbreak of civil war; the meaning of the nation's bloodiest conflict; and, finally, the task of 'binding up the nation's wounds' and protecting the newly won citizenship of African Americans at the close of the war. The book Lincoln on the Civil War: Selected Speeches includes nine of the sixteenth president's most stirring addresses on issues of freedom, civic duty, slavery and the Constitution. The addresses include his early 1838 speech 'Address to the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois', his famous 'House Divided' and Cooper-Union speeches, as well as signal wartime addresses. Everyone is welcome to this free event, presented with the support of a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities, that will take place in the Hutchins Gallery at 2:00.

On Tuesday, lecturer Richard Sloan will be on hand for You Are There at Lincoln's New York City Funeral, "a unique multi-media presentation that transports the audience back in time to April 1865 and makes them eyewitnesses to this great and sad event. This is accomplished by converting contemporary newspaper reports into the present tense and showing old photos, prints, and woodcuts. Sound effects and modern recordings of music heard during the funeral procession and the lying in state at City Hall help cement the mood. Following the presentation, Mr. Sloan will show some of the sites along the route of the procession as they appeared in 1865 and as they appear today. Ironically, many of them have interesting connections to Lincoln, Mrs. Lincoln, and John Wilkes Booth." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will take place at 12:30 in the Hillwood Commons Cinema.

On Wednesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Zoho Basics: Going Beyond Microsoft Office. "Microsoft Office Suite not available? No need to panic, just use Zoho! Zoho's online content sharing and group collaboration allows students and teachers to stay connected beyond the classroom. Zoho's Wiki enables educators to create interactive course content. Zoho's Challenge allows teachers to create tests and quizzes with a variety of question types. Zoho is compatible with Microsoft Office - work online and upload Microsoft Office documents into Zoho, or work offline and open Zoho documents in Microsoft Office." It will run from 5:00-6:15 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On April 17, the Library Liaison Committee will be hosting a Spring Party on the Porch of the library during the common hour (12:30-1:30). There will be a light food and drinks buffet, as well as live music featuring the LIU Post Jazz Combo under the direction of T.K. Blue. All students, faculty, and staff are welcome to this simple social gathering and chance to enjoy the (hopefully) sunny spring weather. We hope that you can attend. No RSVP is required. In the event of rain, the party will take place in the Library Instruction Lab and the library lobby.

The guide to Chicago Citation Style is in the process of being updated to conform with the 16th edition. It now covers journal articles, books, book articles, encyclopedias, and parenthetical references.



04/01 : Competency Exam, Marian Anderson Lecture, Lincoln Film and Readings
On Tuesday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and additional dates).

On Thursday, Marc Courtade will present the lecture, The Legacy of Marian Anderson, at 12:30 in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall. "Marian Anderson was one of the most celebrated singers of the twentieth century. She became an important figure in the struggle for black artists to overcome racial prejudice in the United States during the mid-twentieth century. In 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution refused permission for Anderson to sing to an integrated audience in Constitution Hall. Instead, with the aid of Eleanor Roosevelt, Anderson performed a critically acclaimed open-air concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939. She sang before a crowd of more than 75,000 people and a radio audience in the millions. In 1955, Anderson broke the color barrier by becoming the first African-American to perform with the Metropolitan Opera. In 1958 she was officially designated delegate to the United Nations, a formalization of her role as 'goodwill ambassador' of the U.S., and in 1972 she was awarded the UN Peace Prize. Anderson may have been a reluctant participant in the civil rights movement, but greatness was thrust upon her. A generation of African-American singers is indebted to her for blazing the trail towards equality." Everyone is welcome to this free event that accompanies our exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

On Friday at noon, one of our partners for this exhibit, the Port Washington Public Library, will present the film, Young Mr. Lincoln. Professor Philip Harwood will be there to introduce and discuss this classic film about Lincoln's early years before its screening and to answer your questions after.

On Monday, the Instructional Media Center and the Post Library Association will present the first in a series of weekly readings and discussions facilitated by James Coll, Reading Between the Lines: Lincoln on the Civil War. "This series will allow participants to examine and appreciate anew the rhetoric, political skill, and moral transformation of the sixteenth president. His words are a window into the mind of a canny politician and deep thinker considering the central questions of Civil War era: the nature of democratic participation; how to navigate the turbulent partisanship and regionalism of the antebellum era; the secession crisis and outbreak of civil war; the meaning of the nation's bloodiest conflict; and, finally, the task of 'binding up the nation's wounds' and protecting the newly won citizenship of African Americans at the close of the war. The book Lincoln on the Civil War: Selected Speeches includes nine of the sixteenth president's most stirring addresses on issues of freedom, civic duty, slavery and the Constitution. The addresses include his early 1838 speech 'Address to the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois', his famous 'House Divided' and Cooper-Union speeches, as well as signal wartime addresses. Everyone is welcome to this free event, presented with the support of a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities, that will take place in the Hutchins Gallery at 2:00.

The guide to Chicago Citation Style is in the process of being updated to conform with the 16th edition.

The database, Business and Company ASAP, has been absorbed into Business Insights: Essentials and will no longer be available separately. Business Insights: Essentials provides students, investors, academics, business owners, marketing professionals, and others with the comprehensive data and tools to analyze, research, interpret, and compare information on U.S. and international industries, companies, and business topics. Interactive comparison charts allow users to customize and manipulate financial and statistical data. It includes: SWOT reports - financial reports - industry rankings - market share data - market research reports - professional associations - glossary of business terms - industry reports and profiles - brand and product information - investment research/brokerage reports - company profiles, histories, and chronologies - articles from 3,900 full-text news and academic periodicals - and more. It also includes the reference books: Market Share Reporter, Business Rankings Annual, Encyclopedia of American Industries, International Directory of Company Histories, and many others.



03/28 : Holiday Hours, Business Database, Chicago Style, Competency Exams, Marian Anderson Lecture
The database, Business and Company ASAP, has been absorbed into Business Insights: Essentials and will no longer be available separately. Business Insights: Essentials provides students, investors, academics, business owners, marketing professionals, and others with the comprehensive data and tools to analyze, research, interpret, and compare information on U.S. and international industries, companies, and business topics. Interactive comparison charts allow users to customize and manipulate financial and statistical data. It includes: SWOT reports - financial reports - industry rankings - market share data - market research reports - professional associations - glossary of business terms - industry reports and profiles - brand and product information - investment research/brokerage reports - company profiles, histories, and chronologies - articles from 3,900 full-text news and academic periodicals - and more. It also includes the reference books: Market Share Reporter, Business Rankings Annual, Encyclopedia of American Industries, International Directory of Company Histories, and many others.

The guide to Chicago Citation Style is in the process of being updated to conform with the 16th edition.

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. Another exam will be given on Tuesday.

This weekend, the library will be open 8:00-5:00 on Saturday and 8:30-5:00 on Sunday.

On Tuesday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and additional dates).

On Thursday, Marc Courtade will present the lecture, The Legacy of Marian Anderson, at 12:30 in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall. "Marian Anderson was one of the most celebrated singers of the twentieth century. She became an important figure in the struggle for black artists to overcome racial prejudice in the United States during the mid-twentieth century. In 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution refused permission for Anderson to sing to an integrated audience in Constitution Hall. Instead, with the aid of Eleanor Roosevelt, Anderson performed a critically acclaimed open-air concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939. She sang before a crowd of more than 75,000 people and a radio audience in the millions. In 1955, Anderson broke the color barrier by becoming the first African-American to perform with the Metropolitan Opera. In 1958 she was officially designated delegate to the United Nations, a formalization of her role as 'goodwill ambassador' of the U.S., and in 1972 she was awarded the UN Peace Prize. Anderson may have been a reluctant participant in the civil rights movement, but greatness was thrust upon her. A generation of African-American singers is indebted to her for blazing the trail towards equality." Everyone is welcome to this free event that accompanies our exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.



03/24 : Movie Posters, Library Competency Exam, and Holiday Hours
The Special Collections Department has placed a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway in honor of Harry Belafonte's 86th birthday. These four films comprise a small part of their Original Movie Poster Research Collection - a vivid and instructive series of lithograph posters that promote more than 6,000 films produced from 1940 to 1962. Besides the obvious appeal to film students, these posters should be of interest to art majors (who will be stimulated by the varying graphic design approaches), business students, (who will appreciate the marketing effectiveness - or lack thereof - of the differing ways to advertise movies), and other academic disciplines interested in the history of culture and mores. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead. Another exam will be given on Tuesday (registration instructions and additional dates).

This weekend, the library will be open 8:00-5:00 on Saturday and 8:30-5:00 on Sunday.



03/24 : Children's Books, Library Workshop, Competency Exam, and Holiday Hours
The new exhibit in the back of Reference Commons features A Visual Feast: Illustrated Works from the American Juvenile Collection of children's fiction, folklore, and fairy tales printed in North America, covering the years 1910-1960 (and some from earlier dates). "The American Juvenile Collection staff are delighted to offer you this moment to delight and enrich yourself as a child, to enter into the world of these award winning illustrators and authors on exhibit."

On Tuesday, Section 4 of the Library Workshop will begin at 12:30 in LB 220 (the Library Instruction Lab near the lobby).

On Friday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and additional dates).

This weekend, the library will be open 8:00-5:00 on Saturday and 8:30-5:00 on Sunday.



03/21 : PLA Lecture - From Gutenberg to Google Books; and Library Workshop
On Friday evening, the Post Library Association will present Kempton B. Van Hoff's lecture, From Gutenberg to Google Books: The Evolution of the Publisher's Role. "Publishers have played a pivotal role in the selection and dissemination of information since the late 15th Century. In more recent years, the advent of new technologies has created sweeping changes in the publishing industry from production to distribution, affecting the industry's stability and social significance. These changes in publishing have also had profound effects upon publishers' roles as the selectors and disseminators of information. Since it is now possible for anyone with access to technology to publish, we are left with the question: What, exactly, does it mean to be a publisher in the 21st Century? This lecture presents a publisher and researcher's perspective on the present state and evolution of the publisher's role in an ever-quickening world of technological development." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will begin at 8:00 in the back of Reference Commons.

On Tuesday, Section 4 of the Library Workshop will begin at 12:30 in LB 220 (the Library Instruction Lab near the lobby).

Our newest trial database is Entertainment Industry Magazine Archive It provides the full text of seventeen primary-source US and UK trade magazines and fan magazines from the years 1880-2000 that cover the history of the film, music, radio, theater, television, and other entertainment industries such as vaudeville, music halls, and circuses. It includes: industry news - gossip columns - reviews and criticism - pop charts and statistics - interviews with major figures - development of new technologies - illustrations, photographs, and advertisements - and comprehensive information on specific films, plays, theaters, actors, directors, TV series, film studios, musicians, genres, record labels, subcultures, and youth movements. Titles include Stage (1880-2000), Variety (1905-2000), Billboard (1894-2000), Back Stage (1960-2000), Melody Maker (1926-2000), Broadcasting & Cable (1933-2000), and more.



03/20 : Lincoln Exhibit & Lecture, Entertainment History, Competency Exam, Library Workshop, Evolution of Publishing Lecture
On Thursday, a special exhibit will be opening downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery. "Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War offers a fresh and innovative perspective on Lincoln that focuses on his struggle to meet the political and constitutional challenges of the Civil War. Organized thematically, the exhibition explores how Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the war: the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties." Also on display will be original artwork inspired by the Civil Rights Movement of the 60s by internationally renowned artist Dan Christoffel. The exhibit will be accompanied by a series of events, including lectures, films, discussions, readings, music, and poetry - the first of which will be Thursday's Emancipating Lincoln: The Proclamation in Text, Context, and Memory in which Harold Holzer will examine the impact of Emancipation Proclamation at the moment of its creation and how its meaning has changed over time. It will begin at 12:30 in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall. After the lecture, there will be an opening reception for the exhibit at 2:00 in the Hutchins Gallery. All events are free and open to the public. You can also view the exhibit's accompanying website with resources for additional information. Already on display on the main floor of the library are African Americans and the Civil War (prepared by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History) and Scenes from the Civil War (prepared by the Library of Congress). Both exhibits are supplemented with resources from the library and Civil War memorabilia from private collections. An original pardon document, signed by Lincoln, is available for viewing in the Special Collections Department.

Our newest trial database is Entertainment Industry Magazine Archive It provides the full text of seventeen primary-source US and UK trade magazines and fan magazines from the years 1880-2000 that cover the history of the film, music, radio, theater, television, and other entertainment industries such as vaudeville, music halls, and circuses. It includes: industry news - gossip columns - reviews and criticism - pop charts and statistics - interviews with major figures - development of new technologies - illustrations, photographs, and advertisements - and comprehensive information on specific films, plays, theaters, actors, directors, TV series, film studios, musicians, genres, record labels, subcultures, and youth movements. Titles include Stage (1880-2000), Variety (1905-2000), Billboard (1894-2000), Back Stage (1960-2000), Melody Maker (1926-2000), Broadcasting & Cable (1933-2000), and more.

In response to the many requests for help with citing sources using the APA, MLA, and Chicago citation styles, the library will be holding two Styling Time workshops in April during the common hour (12:30-1:30). Students are encouraged to bring their lists of sources to get hands-on help with citing them.

On Thursday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and additional dates).

Also on Thursday, two sections of the Library Workshop will begin. Section 2 will be at 12:30 in LB 113 (the Instructional Media Center downstairs), and section 5 will be at 12:30 in LB 220 (the Library Instruction Lab near the lobby).

On Friday evening, the Post Library Association will present Kempton B. Van Hoff's lecture, From Gutenberg to Google Books: The Evolution of the Publisher's Role. "Publishers have played a pivotal role in the selection and dissemination of information since the late 15th Century. In more recent years, the advent of new technologies has created sweeping changes in the publishing industry from production to distribution, affecting the industry's stability and social significance. These changes in publishing have also had profound effects upon publishers' roles as the selectors and disseminators of information. Since it is now possible for anyone with access to technology to publish, we are left with the question: What, exactly, does it mean to be a publisher in the 21st Century? This lecture presents a publisher and researcher's perspective on the present state and evolution of the publisher's role in an ever-quickening world of technological development." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will begin at 8:00 in the back of Reference Commons.



03/18 : WebQuests Demo, Lincoln Events, Competency Exam, Library Workshop, Publishing Lecture
On Wednesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, WebQuests. "WebQuests are online inquiry-oriented lesson formats that make an effective use of Internet resources. They have been embraced by educational technologists and teachers world-wide. WebQuests provide a rich, technology-enabled environment for team participation, research, and collaboration. They also extend content knowledge and promote critical thinking activities." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Thursday, a special exhibit will be opening downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery. "Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War offers a fresh and innovative perspective on Lincoln that focuses on his struggle to meet the political and constitutional challenges of the Civil War. Organized thematically, the exhibition explores how Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the war: the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties." Also on display will be original artwork inspired by the Civil Rights Movement of the 60s by internationally renowned artist Dan Christoffel. The exhibit will be accompanied by a series of events, including lectures, films, discussions, readings, music, and poetry - the first of which will be Thursday's Emancipating Lincoln: The Proclamation in Text, Context, and Memory in which Harold Holzer will examine the impact of Emancipation Proclamation at the moment of its creation and how its meaning has changed over time. It will begin at 12:30 in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall. After the lecture, there will be an opening reception for the exhibit at 2:00 in the Hutchins Gallery. All events are free and open to the public. You can also view the exhibit's accompanying website with resources for additional information. Already on display on the main floor of the library are African Americans and the Civil War (prepared by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History) and Scenes from the Civil War (prepared by the Library of Congress). Both exhibits are supplemented with resources from the library and Civil War memorabilia from private collections. An original pardon document, signed by Lincoln, is available for viewing in the Special Collections Department.

Also on Thursday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and additional dates).

In yet another Thursday event, two sections of the Library Workshop will begin. Section 2 will be at 12:30 in LB 113 (the Instructional Media Center downstairs), and section 5 will be at 12:30 in LB 220 (the Library Instruction Lab near the lobby).

On Friday evening, the Post Library Association will present Kempton B. Van Hoff's lecture, From Gutenberg to Google Books: The Evolution of the Publisher's Role. "Publishers have played a pivotal role in the selection and dissemination of information since the late 15th Century. In more recent years, the advent of new technologies has created sweeping changes in the publishing industry from production to distribution, affecting the industry's stability and social significance. These changes in publishing have also had profound effects upon publishers' roles as the selectors and disseminators of information. Since it is now possible for anyone with access to technology to publish, we are left with the question: What, exactly, does it mean to be a publisher in the 21st Century? This lecture presents a publisher and researcher's perspective on the present state and evolution of the publisher's role in an ever-quickening world of technological development." Everyone is welcome to this free event that will begin at 8:00 in the back of Reference Commons.



03/14 : Posters, Hours, WebQuests, Lincoln Events, Exam, Library Workshop
The Special Collections Department has placed a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway in honor of Saint Patrick's Day. Leave It to the Irish showcases four films that feature Irish actors and comprises a small part of their Original Movie Poster Research Collection - a vivid and instructive series of lithograph posters that promote more than 6,000 films produced from 1940 to 1962. Besides the obvious appeal to film students, these posters should be of interest to art majors (who will be stimulated by the varying graphic design approaches), business students, (who will appreciate the marketing effectiveness - or lack thereof - of the differing ways to advertise movies), and other academic disciplines interested in the history of culture and mores. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.

The library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Friday, 8:00-5:00 on Saturday, and 8:30-5:00 on Sunday.

On Wednesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, WebQuests. "WebQuests are online inquiry-oriented lesson formats that make an effective use of Internet resources. They have been embraced by educational technologists and teachers world-wide. WebQuests provide a rich, technology-enabled environment for team participation, research, and collaboration. They also extend content knowledge and promote critical thinking activities." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

On Thursday, a special exhibit will be opening downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery. "Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War offers a fresh and innovative perspective on Lincoln that focuses on his struggle to meet the political and constitutional challenges of the Civil War. Organized thematically, the exhibition explores how Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the war: the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties." Also on display will be original artwork inspired by the Civil Rights Movement of the 60s by internationally renowned artist Dan Christoffel. The exhibit will be accompanied by a series of events, including lectures, films, discussions, readings, music, and poetry - the first of which will be Thursday's Emancipating Lincoln: The Proclamation in Text, Context, and Memory in which Harold Holzer will examine the impact of Emancipation Proclamation at the moment of its creation and how its meaning has changed over time. It will begin at 12:30 in the Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall. After the lecture, there will be an opening reception for the exhibit at 2:00 in the Hutchins Gallery. All events are free and open to the public. You can also view the exhibit's accompanying website with resources for additional information. Already on display on the main floor of the library are African Americans and the Civil War (prepared by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History) and Scenes from the Civil War (prepared by the Library of Congress). Both exhibits are supplemented with resources from the library and Civil War memorabilia from private collections. An original pardon document, signed by Lincoln, is available for viewing in the Special Collections Department.

Also on Thursday, the next Library Competency Exam will take place at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and additional dates).

In yet another Thursday event, two sections of the Library Workshop will begin. Section 2 will be at 12:30 in LB 113 (the Instructional Media Center downstairs), and section 5 will be at 12:30 in LB 220 (the Library Instruction Lab near the lobby).



03/10 : Spring Break Hours
During spring break, the library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Monday-Friday. Next weekend, we will be open 8:00-5:00 on Saturday and 8:30-5:00 on Sunday. The Bookmark Café will be closed.


03/06 : Islamic Studies Database, Snow, and Spring Break Hours
Our newest database is Oxford Islamic Studies Online, a unique, authoritative reference center with over 5,000 articles that provide learning tools for students, scholars, librarians, community groups, and government officials to foster a more informed understanding of the Islamic world. It includes: a new and growing section on the Arab Spring - a timeline of major events since the founding of Islam - learning resources with thematic guides and lesson plans - interviews with major scholars, activists, and religious leaders - two English translations of the Qur'an along with a concordance - hundreds of images and maps with a section devoted to the geography of the Islamic world - and the full text of the reference books: Oxford Dictionary of Islam, Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Law, Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Politics, Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World, Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Women, and What Everyone Needs to Know about Islam.

In the event of snow, you can check the campus website or call 516-299-EMER (3637) to find out if the library and campus are closed or if classes have been cancelled.

This weekend, the library will be open normal hours. Next week, the library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Monday-Friday. Next weekend, we will be open 8:00-5:00 on 3/16 and 8:30-5:00 on 3/17. The Bookmark Café will be closed.

"The library has added a LibGuide for faculty, titled Copyright Guidelines for Online Course Development, to assist faculty in making informed decisions about copyright and the use of copyrighted materials in online and blended courses. We've worked very closely with the University Counsel (Lynette Phillips) who has reviewed and approved the information. The LibGuide incorporates US copyright law, TEACH Act, Fair Use, and recent judicial decisions, and it reflects LIU's guidelines for use of materials in web enhanced, blended, and online courses. Also, to better support faculty, we've created a Copyright Assistant Tool (accessible from the initial page) that walks faculty through the basic decision making process of heuristically applying the information/resources (which can be somewhat overwhelming)."



03/05 : Copyright Guidelines, New Books, Websites for Teachers, Spring Break Hours, and More
"The library has added a LibGuide for faculty, titled Copyright Guidelines for Online Course Development, to assist faculty in making informed decisions about copyright and the use of copyrighted materials in online and blended courses. We've worked very closely with the University Counsel (Lynette Phillips) who has reviewed and approved the information. The LibGuide incorporates US copyright law, TEACH Act, Fair Use, and recent judicial decisions, and it reflects LIU's guidelines for use of materials in web enhanced, blended, and online courses. Also, to better support faculty, we've created a Copyright Assistant Tool (accessible from the initial page) that walks faculty through the basic decision making process of heuristically applying the information/resources (which can be somewhat overwhelming)."

At the LIU Brentwood library's website, the lists of new circulating books, reference books, and children's books have been updated.

On Wednesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Recommended Websites for Teachers. "Take a walk on the moon or stroll through the galleries of the Louvre in Paris. Go on an archeological dig of Jamestown or view Thomas Edison's drawing of the light bulb - all with the click of a mouse. This workshop will introduce the best internet resources for educators. A sampling from a variety of K-12 subject areas will be demonstrated. How to evaluate a website will also be included in this workshop." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

Also on Wednesday, the Career Development Office will be presenting an information session on Exploring Careers and Choosing Majors upstairs in LB 386 from 12:30-1:30. "Are you exploring majors but still uncertain of the right direction? Thinking of switching majors? Join us for a lively discussion on the common myths and realities that often shape students' decisions when choosing a major. Come and gain valuable tips on how to make good choices about majors, minors, and careers." For more information, contact Staci Siegel at 516-299-2582 or email Staci.Siegel@liu.edu.

Also (again) on Wednesday, the blood drive in the Hillwood Commons East West Café will continue from 9:00am-8:30pm. No appointments are necessary. Please donate if you can.

This weekend, the library will be open normal hours. Next week, the library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Monday-Friday. Next weekend, we will be open 8:00-5:00 on 3/16 and 8:30-5:00 on 3/17.



03/03 : Cochrane Library, Competency Exam, Websites for Teachers, and Other Campus Events
The Cochrane Library changed its URL without telling us, so, if you had problems accessing it last week, this was the reason why. All the links on our site have now been fixed. It provides access to over 2000 independent literature reviews that combine the results of the world's medical research on the effects of healthcare interventions, exploring the evidence for and against the effectiveness and appropriateness of treatments.

The next Library Competency Exam will be on Tuesday at 3:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and additional dates).

On Tuesday and Wednesday, there will be a blood drive in the Hillwood Commons East West Café from 9:00am-8:30pm. No appointments are necessary. Please donate if you can.

On Tuesday, the Palmer School of Library and Information Science will be holding an open house in the Tilles Atrium and Patrons Lounge at 6:30pm.

On Wednesday, the Career Development Office will be presenting an information session on Exploring Careers and Choosing Majors upstairs in LB 386 from 12:30-1:30. For more information, contact Staci Siegel at 516-299-2582 or email Staci.Siegel@liu.edu.

Also on Wednesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Recommended Websites for Teachers. "Take a walk on the moon or stroll through the galleries of the Louvre in Paris. Go on an archeological dig of Jamestown or view Thomas Edison's drawing of the light bulb - all with the click of a mouse. This workshop will introduce the best internet resources for educators. A sampling from a variety of K-12 subject areas will be demonstrated. How to evaluate a website will also be included in this workshop." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.



02/27 : Education Workshops & Resources, Library Competency Exam, and Other Campus Events
On Saturday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the Phi Delta Kappa Chapter 1524, will present two workshops for education students: SmartBoard Technology and Integrated Program Tools with librarians Manju Prasad-Rao, Jean Uhl, and Maria Zarycky, and Common Core State Standards with Dr. Roberta Levitt from the Department of Special Education and Literacy. It will run from 10:00-1:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to pdkeventcoordinator@gmail.com.

The pathfinder to hardcopy resources for Special Education has been updated. This is only one of the many pathfinders that are available to help you get started with your research.

The next Library Competency Exam will be on Tuesday at 3:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and additional dates).

On Tuesday and Wednesday, there will be a blood drive in the Hillwood Commons East West Café from 9:00am-8:30pm. No appointments are necessary. Please donate if you can.

On Tuesday, the Palmer School of Library and Information Science will be holding an open house in the Tilles Atrium and Patrons Lounge at 6:30pm.

On Wednesday, the Career Development Office will be presenting an information session on Exploring Careers and Choosing Majors upstairs in LB 386 from 12:30-1:30. For more information, contact Staci Siegel at 516-299-2582 or email Staci.Siegel@liu.edu.

Also on Wednesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Recommended Websites for Teachers. "Take a walk on the moon or stroll through the galleries of the Louvre in Paris. Go on an archeological dig of Jamestown or view Thomas Edison's drawing of the light bulb - all with the click of a mouse. This workshop will introduce the best internet resources for educators. A sampling from a variety of K-12 subject areas will be demonstrated. How to evaluate a website will also be included in this workshop." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.



02/25 : Library Competency Exam
The next Library Competency Exam will be on Wednesday at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts, so it's too late for this one. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and additional dates).


02/21 : Competency Exam, Business Databases, and Book a Librarian
The next Library Competency Exam will be on Friday at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts, so it's too late for this one, but there will be another on Wednesday. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

We no longer subscribe to the databases from the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU): ViewsWire and Country Commerce and Country Finance. The links are in the process of being removed from our website, but you can still get international business news and research reports from our other business and newspaper databases.

In addition to online reference assistance, email assistance, telephone assistance, and, of course, visiting the library in person, students and faculty can also Book a Librarian to get intensive one-on-one research assistance and undivided attention. The library has many online and hardcopy resources that most people are unaware of, and the databases have advanced features for pulling up the desired results. People often think that they've tried all the possibilities and become convinced that the information that they need does not exist when there are still many more options. Please feel free to make an appointment using this form for a private consultation with a librarian.



02/18 : Book a Librarian, Children's Literature, Competency Exam
In addition to online reference assistance, email assistance, telephone assistance, and, of course, visiting the library in person, students and faculty can also Book a Librarian to get intensive one-on-one research assistance and undivided attention. The library has many online and hardcopy resources that most people are unaware of, and the databases have advanced features for pulling up the desired results. People often think that they've tried all the possibilities and become convinced that the information that they need does not exist when there are still many more options. Please feel free to make an appointment using this form for a private consultation with a librarian.

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Using SmartBoard with Children's Literature. "This workshop will explore combining the use of print materials with digital resources. The one-hour workshop will include hands-on experimentation with the interactive whiteboard, development of a basic SmartBoard lesson, and the evaluation of age-appropriate children's literature through the use of websites and databases." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

The next Library Competency Exam will be on Friday at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before it starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).



02/14 : French Connection Art Lecture, New Exhibit, Database News, Holiday Hours, Ed Tech Demo
On Friday, the Post Library Association will present Carol Forman Tabler and Fred Baker, who will discuss the exhibition, The French Connection, that is currently on view at the Hillwood Art Museum. This exhibition of nineteenth century art, which encourages the discovery of cross-cultural relationships, features French works from the Tabler Collection and American works from the Baker/Pisano Collection. It bears witness to the artistic brilliance of these artists who, whether French or American, lived or sojourned in Paris, the capital of the art world, where they measured themselves against the highest standards of excellence. The Americans who came to study in Paris were shaped not only by the traditional training they received but also by the free spirit of innovation permeating the atmosphere of the art world at that time. The variety of mediums displayed in the exhibition demonstrates the high quality and significance of prints and drawings as art forms in their own rights on a par with oil painting. Everyone is welcome to this free event that will begin the the back of Reference Common at 8:00 p.m.

In celebration of African American History Month, the new exhibit in the library lobby is African Americans and the Civil War which was prepared by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History and is supplemented with resources from the collections of the Library of Congress and the B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library. It will serve as a companion to our upcoming exhibit in March, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

The Encore system (the search box on the library's homepage labeled, "Find Books, Articles and More") is not working properly. When you attempt to download a full-text PDF document, you might instead be prompted for an Ebscohost login. The library IT team is working on resolving this issue. Until this issue is resolved you can still search for full text articles directly from the library's database pages. If you already know the citation to the exact article that you want, you can search for the journal title from the Periodicals link on the library's homepage. The database outages and alerts page will keep you posted on the status of this and any other problems that we are aware of. We apologize for the inconvenience.

The trial periods for Early English Books Online and the two video databases have been extended.

This weekend, the library will be open 8:00-5:00 on Saturday, 8:30-5:00 on Sunday, and 12:00-8:00 on Monday. The Bookmark Café will be closed on Monday.

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Using SmartBoard with Children's Literature. "This workshop will explore combining the use of print materials with digital resources. The one-hour workshop will include hands-on experimentation with the interactive whiteboard, development of a basic SmartBoard lesson, and the evaluation of age-appropriate children's literature through the use of websites and databases." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.



02/12 : Abraham Lincoln, Romantic Movies, Competency Exam, Art Lecture, Holiday Hours, Ed Tech Demo
As mentioned in Sunday's posting, next month the library will be hosting the exhibit, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War, and we've posted a PDF file of the special brochure that highlights the lectures, films, readings, discussions, concert, and more that will accompany it.

Valentine's Day is almost here, and the Special Collections Department is continuing to create the mood by placing a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway. Isn't It Romantic showcases four more of the sixty romance movies that comprise a small part of their Original Movie Poster Research Collection - a vivid and instructive series of lithograph posters that promote more than 6,000 films produced from 1940 to 1962. Besides the obvious appeal to film students, these posters should be of interest to art majors (who will be stimulated by the varying graphic design approaches), business students, (who will appreciate the marketing effectiveness - or lack thereof - of the differing ways to advertise movies), and other academic disciplines interested in the history of culture and mores. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.

From Information Technology: "Due to some outages with the Blackboard server and dependent services, users were not able to authenticate into the system. We have performed emergency services to resolve the issue and all services are back to normal. Information Technology deeply appreciates your patience and cooperation. If you are still experiencing issues, please contact your local IT resources."

The next Library Competency Exam will be on Thursday at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing at least 48 hours before the exam starts in order to take it, so it's too late for this one. But if you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (additional dates and registration instructions).

On Friday, the Post Library Association will present Carol Forman Tabler and Fred Baker, who will discuss the exhibition, The French Connection, that is currently on view at the Hillwood Art Museum. This exhibition of nineteenth century art, which encourages the discovery of cross-cultural relationships, features French works from the Tabler Collection and American works from the Baker/Pisano Collection. It bears witness to the artistic brilliance of these artists who, whether French or American, lived or sojourned in Paris, the capital of the art world, where they measured themselves against the highest standards of excellence. The Americans who came to study in Paris were shaped not only by the traditional training they received but also by the free spirit of innovation permeating the atmosphere of the art world at that time. The variety of mediums displayed in the exhibition demonstrates the high quality and significance of prints and drawings as art forms in their own rights on a par with oil painting. Everyone is welcome to this free event that will begin the the back of Reference Common at 8:00 p.m.

This weekend, the library will be open 8:00-5:00 on Saturday, 8:30-5:00 on Sunday, and 12:00-8:00 on Monday. The Bookmark Café will be closed on Monday.

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Using SmartBoard with Children's Literature. "This workshop will explore combining the use of print materials with digital resources. The one-hour workshop will include hands-on experimentation with the interactive whiteboard, development of a basic SmartBoard lesson, and the evaluation of age-appropriate children's literature through the use of websites and databases." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.



02/10 : Movable Books, Civil War, SmartBoard Workshop, Competency Exam, Art Lecture
The new exhibit in the back of Reference Commons showcases examples from the Instructional Media Center's collection of Movable Books. Often called pop-up books, these are any kind of books that can undergo transformations through the use of flaps, pull-tabs, pop-outs, pull-downs, rotatable disks, and more. Dating back to 1306, they were originally made for adults, but children's versions began to be created in the 18th century. On display are moveable books that feature scenes of the circus, fairies, castles, and a gingerbread house, as well as such famous characters as Cinderella, Curious George, Punch and Judy, the Wizard of Oz, and the Star Wars cantina. There are also educational books that demonstrate scientific concepts in anatomy, astronomy, and meteorology.

The other new exhibit in the back of Reference Commons is Scenes from the Civil War. Prepared by the Library of Congress, it takes a look at the causes, history, battlegrounds, timeline, maps, art, photography, and reporting of the Civil War. The exhibit is supplemented by library resources and Civil War memorabilia from the library and private collections. It harbingers our big exhibit in March, Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War.

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Creating SmartBoard Interactive Lessons with Notebook. "Enhance content and motivate students with interactive lessons using Notebook software tools. Create your own lessons or assessments, modify existing resources, and integrate multimedia content. Instruction is modified and tailored as per the needs of the students." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

The next Library Competency Exam will be on Thursday at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before the exam starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).

On Friday, the Post Library Association will present Carol Forman Tabler and Fred Baker, who will discuss the exhibition, The French Connection, that is currently on view at the Hillwood Art Museum. This exhibition of nineteenth century art, which encourages the discovery of cross-cultural relationships, features French works from the Tabler Collection and American works from the Baker/Pisano Collection. It bears witness to the artistic brilliance of these artists, who, whether French or American, lived or sojourned in Paris, the capital of the art world, where they measured themselves against the highest standards of excellence. The Americans, who came to study in Paris, were shaped not only by the traditional training they received but also by the free spirit of innovation permeating the atmosphere of the art world at that time. The variety of mediums displayed in the exhibition demonstrates the high quality and significance of prints and drawings as art forms in their own rights, on a par with oil painting. Everyone is welcome to this free event that will begin the the back of Reference Common at 8:00 p.m.



02/07 : Snow Closing, Educational Technology Workshop, and Competency Exam
Due to the coming storm, the library will be closed on Saturday. As of this posting, no decisions have yet been made regarding Friday or Sunday. For the latest information about campus closings and class cancellations, you can check the campus website or call 516-299-EMER (3637).

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Creating SmartBoard Interactive Lessons with Notebook. "Enhance content and motivate students with interactive lessons using Notebook software tools. Create your own lessons or assessments, modify existing resources, and integrate multimedia content. Instruction is modified and tailored as per the needs of the students." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.

The next Library Competency Exam will be on Thursday at 12:30 in LB 227. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before the exam starts. If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead (registration instructions and more information).



02/05 : Survey Results, Romantic Movies, and Educational Technology Workshop
The results of last fall's Student Library and Information Technology Use Survey are in, and you can read all about them in this press release.

Valentine's Day is nine days away, and the Special Collections Department is continuing to create the mood by placing a new set of vintage movie posters on display in the upstairs hallway. Isn't It Romantic showcases four of the sixty romance movies that comprise a small part of their Original Movie Poster Research Collection - a vivid and instructive series of lithograph posters that promote more than 6,000 films produced from 1940 to 1962. Besides the obvious appeal to film students, these posters should be of interest to art majors (who will be stimulated by the varying graphic design approaches), business students, (who will appreciate the marketing effectiveness - or lack thereof - of the differing ways to advertise movies), and other academic disciplines interested in the history of culture and mores. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.

On Tuesday, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will present the special, hands-on educational technology workshop, Creating SmartBoard Interactive Lessons with Notebook. "Enhance content and motivate students with interactive lessons using Notebook software tools. Create your own lessons or assessments, modify existing resources, and integrate multimedia content. Instruction is modified and tailored as per the needs of the students." It will run from 3:45-5:00 downstairs in the IMC. Please R.S.V.P. to 516-299-2895 or abir.khoury@liu.edu.



02/03 : Another Video Database
Our newest trial database is Films on Demand that provides thousands of exclusive educational videos from more than 700 top producers such as PBS, BBC, NBC News, ABC News, Shopware, Meridian Education, National Geographic, Cambridge Educational, and Films for the Humanities & Sciences. Videos are grouped into subject-specific categories and segmented into predefined clips with the ability to share, save, and organize videos into custom playlists. The trial includes: the FMG Archival Films and Newsreels Collection, the Master Academic Collection (covering health, science, business, economics, humanities, mathematics, and social sciences), and the Master Career and Technical Education Collection (covering careers, guidance, counseling, and job search in the health and service industries with specific trade and industrial skills to prepare students to enter and succeed in the workforce). Compare it with our other trial of VAST: Academic Video Online.


01/29 : Competency Exams, Adult Student Workshop, and Palmer School Open House
The schedule of library competency exams for the semester has been posted. The first on will be on February 14. You must register with Academic Standing to take the exam at least 48 hours before the exam date (more information). If you do not take the exam before you have earned 60 credits, you will be required to take the Library Workshop instead.

On Saturday, the library, in cooperation with the Office of Adult and Non-Traditional Programs, will be holding a Return-to-Learning workshop. All undergraduate adult students (age 25 and older) enrolled at LIU Post are invited to meet in the library lobby to learn how to use the library's computer lab, how to access the library's extensive databases, and receive a library bar code for your student ID. The workshop will include hands-on demonstrations and a library tour. It will run from 10:00-12:00, and light refreshments will be served. To RSVP or for more information, email post-adultservices@liu.edu or call (516) 299-2040.

Also on Saturday, the Palmer School of Library and Information Science upstairs will be holding a Ph.D. in Information Studies Open House from 2:30-4:00 in room 362.

At the LIU Brentwood library's website, the lists of new circulating books, reference books, and children's books have been updated.



01/24 : Video Database and Vintage Movie Posters
The newest database that is available for a brief trial period is VAST: Academic Video Online. From early twentieth-century newsreels to just-released documentaries, this database provides access to thousands of award-winning films, interviews, commercials, performances, news programs, field recordings, and more from dozens of producers and distributors including PBS, the BBC, and many more. Each video comes with a complete, synchronized transcript. Users can make custom clips, name them, annotate them, and place them into personal playlists that can be shared in course folders and embedded on websites. It covers a wide range of disciplines, such as: art, law, opera, dance, health, history, theatre, politics, science, therapy, religion, business, literature, education, languages, economics, counseling, philosophy, humanities, psychology, area studies, architecture, public safety, anthropology, ethnic studies, LGBT studies, criminal justice, women's studies, political science, and more.

Valentine's Day is still three weeks away, but the Special Collections Department is starting to create the mood with its latest display of vintage movie posters in the upstairs hallway. Isn't It Romantic showcases four of the sixty romance movies that comprise a small part of their Original Movie Poster Research Collection - a vivid and instructive series of lithograph posters that promote more than 6,000 films produced from 1940 to 1962. Besides the obvious appeal to film students, these posters should be of interest to art majors (who will be stimulated by the varying graphic design approaches), business students, (who will appreciate the marketing effectiveness - or lack thereof - of the differing ways to advertise movies), and other academic disciplines interested in the history of culture and mores. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.



01/22 : Educational Technology, Database Downtime, Library Workshop, and Artists' Reception
Throughout the semester, the Instructional Media Center, in cooperation with the College of Education, Information and Technology, will be presenting a series of hands-on educational technology workshops on such topics as Zoho, WebQuests, SmartBoards, Google Earth, children's literature, and recommended websites. The first will be on February 12.

From the ARTstor User Services Team: "Please be advised that ARTstor will be performing an upgrade to our systems on Wednesday, January 23 between 9:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. During this time, users will still be able to access the ARTstor Digital Library but may experience some slowness. If you do experience any difficulties, please clear the cache on your browser and restart your web browser. If you continue to experience difficulties, please do not hesitate to contact User Services at userservices@artstor.org."

On Wednesday, section 3 of the Library Workshop will begin at 12:30 in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220). An additional section has been added, and please note that there has been a room change: section 2, which begins in March, will take place in the computer lab downstairs in the Instructional Media Center (LB113).

Also on Wednesday will be the opening reception for the new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery that features the work of Emerging Artists Marvin Arevalo, Robert Calame, Ashley Ciccotelli, Marc Isaacs, Lee Hyun Kim, Jong Won Lee, Brandon Morris, David Rogers, Youngmi Seo, and Yu Sam Sung. It will run from 5:00-8:00.



01/21 : Welcome Back, Library Workshop, Artists' Reception, Database News, and More
On Wednesday, section 3 of the Library Workshop will begin at 12:30 in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220). An additional section has been added, and please note that there has been a room change: section 2, which begins in March, will take place in the computer lab downstairs in the Instructional Media Center (LB113).

Also on Wednesday will be the opening reception for the new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery that features the work of Emerging Artists Marvin Arevalo, Robert Calame, Ashley Ciccotelli, Marc Isaacs, Lee Hyun Kim, Jong Won Lee, Brandon Morris, David Rogers, Youngmi Seo, and Yu Sam Sung. It will run from 5:00-8:00.

A new database that is available for a brief trial period is Early English Books Online. It contains digital facsimile page images of virtually every work printed from 1473-1700 in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and British North America, along with works in English printed elsewhere. It includes the first book printed in English by William Caxton up through the age of Spenser and Shakespeare and the tumult of the English Civil War.

Newsday is no longer available from ProQuest, but the latest six months of it are still available from Lexis-Nexis Academic Universe. The link for ProQuest Newspapers (All) has been modified so that it will now enable you to search both the current and historical newspaper databases that are available from ProQuest at the same time. You can still select to search any of them individually as well.

The schedule of events that are being sponsored by the Post Library Association has been posted. The schedule of exhibits and events that are being sponsored by the library is also available.

At the LIU Brentwood library's website, the lists of new reference books, circulating books, and children's books have been updated.

A brief description on the new Howard P. Gordon History of Opera and Musical Theatre collection has been added to the Special Collection Department's homepage. They've also changed the vintage movie posters that are on display in the upstairs hallway.

A 2013 calendar has been posted for your use.



01/17 : Newsday News, Theatre History, Library Hours, Library Workshop, Artists' Reception
Newsday is no longer available from ProQuest, but the latest six months of it are still available from Lexis-Nexis Academic Universe. The link for ProQuest Newspapers (All) has been modified so that it will now enable you to search both the current and historical newspaper databases that are available from ProQuest at the same time. You can still select to search any of them individually as well.

A brief description on the new Howard P. Gordon History of Opera and Musical Theatre collection has been added to the Special Collection Department's homepage.

The library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Friday and closed Saturday-Sunday. We will also be open 9:00-5:00 on Monday. Normal spring semester hours will resume on Tuesday and the Bookmark Café will reopen.

On Wednesday, section 3 of the Library Workshop will begin at 12:30 in the Library Instruction Lab (LB220).

Also on Wednesday will be the opening reception for the new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery that features the work of Emerging Artists Marvin Arevalo, Robert Calame, Ashley Ciccotelli, Marc Isaacs, Lee Hyun Kim, Jong Won Lee, Brandon Morris, David Rogers, Youngmi Seo, and Yu Sam Sung. It will run from 5:00-8:00.

A new database that is available for a brief trial period is Early English Books Online. It contains digital facsimile page images of virtually every work printed from 1473-1700 in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and British North America, along with works in English printed elsewhere. It includes the first book printed in English by William Caxton up through the age of Spenser and Shakespeare and the tumult of the English Civil War.



01/16 : Early English Books, Art Exhibit, and Library Hours
A new database that is available for a brief trial period is Early English Books Online. It contains digital facsimile page images of virtually every work printed from 1473-1700 in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and British North America, along with works in English printed elsewhere. It includes the first book printed in English by William Caxton up through the age of Spenser and Shakespeare and the tumult of the English Civil War.

The new exhibit downstairs in the Hutchins Gallery features the work of Emerging Artists: Marvin Arevalo, Robert Calame, Ashley Ciccotelli, Marc Isaacs, Lee Hyun Kim, Jong Won Lee, Brandon Morris, David Rogers, Youngmi Seo, and Yu Sam Sung. The opening reception will be next Wednesday at 5:00.

This week, the library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Wednesday-Friday and closed Saturday-Sunday. We will be open 9:00-5:00 next Monday. Normal spring semester hours will resume on January 22, and the Bookmark Café will reopen.



01/14 : Library Hours and More New Books
This week, the library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Monday-Friday and closed Saturday-Sunday. We will be open 9:00-5:00 next Monday. Normal spring semester hours will resume on January 22, and the Bookmark Café will reopen.

At the LIU Brentwood library's website, the list of new reference books has been updated, and the lists of new circulating books and children's books have been re-updated.

A art new exhibit is being set up in the Hutchins Gallery (more information when it becomes available).



01/10 : Library Hours, Holiday Hours, PLA Events, and New Books
The Reference and Circulation Departments will be open 9:00-8:00 on Thursday, and all the other departments will be open 9:00-5:00. The entire library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Friday and closed Saturday and Sunday. We will also be open 9:00-5:00 every day next week. The Bookmark Café will be closed until January 22.

The schedule of holiday and extended hours for the spring semester has been posted.

The schedule of events for the spring semester that are being sponsored by the Post Library Association has been posted.

At the LIU Brentwood library's website, the lists of new circulating books and children's books have been updated.



01/07 : Library Hours, Movie Posters, and Library Workshop
The Reference and Circulation Departments will be open 9:00-8:00 on Monday through Thursday, and all the other departments will be open 9:00-5:00. The entire library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Friday and closed Saturday and Sunday. The Bookmark Café will be closed until January 22.

An additional section has been added to the Library Competency Workshops that are being offered this semester.

The Special Collections Department has changed the vintage movie posters that are on display in the upstairs hallway and that accompany our current exhibit in the lobby, New York: The Rhythms of the Street. These are only a few examples from their Original Movie Poster Research Collection, a vivid and instructive series of lithograph posters that promote more than 6,000 films produced from 1940 to 1962. Besides the obvious appeal to film students, these posters should be of interest to art majors (who will be stimulated by the varying graphic design approaches), business students, (who will appreciate the marketing effectiveness - or lack thereof - of the differing ways to advertise movies), and other academic disciplines interested in the history of culture and mores. Their website lists the collection by genre and contains images of the posters for the top 100 movies.

The 2013 calendar has been posted for your use.



01/02 : Happy New Year!
The Reference and Circulation Departments will be open 9:00-8:00 on Wednesday and Thursday, and all the other departments will be open 9:00-5:00. The library will be open 9:00-5:00 on Friday and open 9:00-4:00 on Saturday. We will be closed on Sunday. The Bookmark Café will be closed until January 22.

The 2013 calendar has been posted for your use.

The spring schedule of Library Competency Workshops has been posted. Section 3 begins on January 23. Please note that there has been a room change and that section 2, which begins in March, will take place in the computer lab downstairs in the Instructional Media Center (LB113). The other sections will continue to meet in the Library Instruction Lab on the main floor (LB220).

On Saturday, Ebsco will be performing planned maintenance from 7:00am-3:00pm. This should not affect normal database searching and access to full text articles, although some databases may experience a delay in currency. The features that will be affected include logging into your personal Ebsco account, adding new items to your personal folder as well as accessing the items already there, CINAHL Continuing Education Unit (CEU) Modules (but not the CINAHL database), and a few others. We apologize for any inconvenience caused by this maintenance interval (more information).

Next week, the Reference and Circulation Departments will be open 9:00-8:00 on Monday through Thursday, and all the other departments will be open 9:00-5:00.



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