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Oyster Bay
A Long Island Heritage Town: Oyster Bay, An Historic Hamlet / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.5-12; May. 1985.
A collection of articles about Oyster Bay. The main article gives details about the town's founding in 1639 to present day. Includes information about T. R. Roosevelt. Images Include: Rail Road Station; Summer White House; The Landing; East Main Street showing Presbyterian Church; Octagon Hotel; Mill Road; West Main Street with Post Office; T. R. Roosevelt on Audrey Ave.; T. R. Roosevelt in Oyster Bay; T. R. Roosevelt at Sagamore Hill; Oyster Bay Inn; Town Clerks Office on Audrey Ave.; Ludlum Homestead; LIRR welcoming T. R. Roosevelt; Greenwich-Oyster bay Ferry; Fullers and T. R. Roosevelt;
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay
Flushing's Early History / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 10; p.209-210, 212, 214; Oct. 1941.
A detailed article about the founding of Flushing, and it's impact on other local towns. The article details the involvement of Flushing in the Revolutionary War, important figures in Flushing (Long Island) history, with an overview of what made Flushing what it is today.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay
Glen Cove Gets a Telegraph / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.11; Apr. 1985.
A brief article on how Glen Cove came to receive it's first telegraph. It talks about how it was set up between Glen Cove, Hempstead, and Oyster Bay.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay
Life of The Early Islanders (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.45, 46-47, 57-58; Mar. 1943.
A very detailed article about the beginnings of Long Island. The article describes the founding through present day. The second part of the article focuses on the later part of the 1600s through the late 1800s. It also focuses on the governmental and architectural uniqueness of the town.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1644-1770) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.13-38; Fall 1965.
A chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay
The Birth of Nassau County (part 1) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 11; p.299-230; Nov. 1940.
A detailed, but brief, article about the founding of Nassau County. It primarily focuses on the politics, governmental issues, and who was involved. The towns mentioned in the article were in relation to county development and home-towns of county leaders.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay
The Birth of Nassau County (part 2) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 12; p.255-256; Dec. 1940.
A continuation of the article "The Birth of Nassau County," and primarily focuses on the politics and governmental issues. However, the majority of the article focuses on the people who were influential in developing the county.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay
The Pearl in the Bay-A Visit to the Hamlet / B. Bush. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.33, 36; Mar. 1982.
A long article about the town of Oyster Bay and it's Hamlet. Important buildings include: Raynham Hall , Theodore Roosevelt Elementary School, and Main Street. The article is told from a tourist point of view.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay -- African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Architects
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Culture
Literary Culture on Long Island, 1640-1700 / C. Auser. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 2; p.19-25; Spring 1964.
A short article about the education and religious education of the population of Long Island. Some towns are noted as having made special strides toward religious education.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th of April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Henry Lloyd Estate
The Account Books of Henry Lloyd of the Manor of Queens Village / R. Bailey. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.26-49; Spring 1962.
Primarily an article about Henry Lloyd and Queens Village Manor (an estate connected to the English Court through Governor pensions), how important the records that Lloyd kept are to Genealogy, the history of what is Lloyd's Neck, Long Island. The Manor is located between Huntington and Oyster Bay. See printing of the account books in Vol. 5, No. 3, Summer 1965, pgs. 30-34.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Historic Homes
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable districts).
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Historic Preservation
Historic Preservation on Long Island / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.1-8; Spring 1964.
A very short article with heavy detail about what buildings and historic places on Long Island should be preserved. Special notes are made for specific towns. Oyster Bay is noted because of the preservation's society's tireless work in restoring and preserving Raynham Hall (and being involved with the preservation of Sagamore Hill).
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay -- John Youngs
The Inventories of the Estates of Colonel John Youngs of Southold and His Son, John Jr / K. Scott. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p. 37-46; Winter 1966.
An accounting of the estate of Col. John Youngs and John Youngs, Jr. Includes bibliographical information about their travels to various towns across Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Long Island Railroad Company
T. R. and the L.I.R.R. / R. Ziel. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; P.10; May. 1985.
A long article about the history of T. R. and his involvement with the Fullers, who founded the Long Island Rail Road. Image of Fuller and the Roosevelt's.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay -- Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Molly Cooper
Molly Cooper of Cove Neck / J. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 5; p.9-10, 18-19; May. 1939.
The biographical account of Molly Cooper, who made a large impact on Cove Neck and Oyster Bay. She kept a diary during the period (1769-1773) just prior to the Revolutionary War.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Motor Parkway
Vanderbilt's Motor Parkway / R. Wines. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.14-28; Fall 1962.
The story of the construction of the now abandoned Vanderbilt Parkway. Originally designed for safe and hazard free racing, the Vanderbilt Speedway eventually Failed. This town attempted to stop the public races after people were killed in the pursuit of the 6th Vanderbilt Cup.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Population
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Presidents
Suffolk County Lured Presidents / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 2; p.7, 20-21; Mar. 1938.
An article about the Presidential influences on Long Island, including T. R. Roosevelt, William Harrison, & Ulysses S. Grant. It also includes some information about First Lady, Anna Symmes.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Quakers
Oyster Bay's Place in the History of Quakerism in America / B. Johnston. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.12; May. 1985.
A long article about the history of Oyster Bay and the Quakers who settled the town. It also gives an explanation of how Quakerism changed to reflect the traditions of Long Island. Images included are the pulpit rock of town's fonder and a reenactment of the revolutionary war.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay -- Quakers and Abolitionism
Friends in the Spirit: African Americans and the Challenge to Quaker Liberalism, 1776-1915 / L. Day. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.1-16; Fall 1997.
The history of Quakers on Long Island. The primary focus of the article is on Quaker involvement in abolishing slavery on Long Island, as well as the work in helping slaves escape. The article also describes how Quakers have influenced various towns on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Oyster Bay -- Robert Feke
Oyster Bay's Robert Feke: America's First Portraitist / L. Cuttler. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A detailed article about Robert Feke, a Long Island, native from Oyster Bay.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay -- Sagamore Hill
Sagamore Hill, Roosevelt's Legacy / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.37; Mar. 1982.
A detailed article about the tourism of Sagamore Hill, it's history, and it's connection to T. Roosevelt.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay -- Sagamore Hill
The Ghosts of Sagamore Hill / A. Roosevelt, Jr. American Heritage, XXI-3; p.70-73; Apr. 70.
The biographical account of Theodore Roosevelt's grandson, who was one at the time of the President's death. He states that spending time at the family home, Sagamore Hill, in Oyster Bay is a haunted experience for him. He notes that he feels the "ghost" of the former President is there, through his many possessions and through the work of his aunt, Alice Roosevelt (President Roosevelt's eldest daughter).
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay -- Schools
Early Oyster Bay Schools / H. Horton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 11; p.213; Nov. 1944.
A short article about the first few schools in Oyster Bay, as done by the English and Dutch settlers. The article goes into detail about the first school founding in 1677, and the 1802 founding of the Academy. The article also discusses the impact of religious education in public schools.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay -- Teddy Roosevelt
T. R. and the L.I.R.R. / R. Ziel. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; P.10; May. 1985.
A long article about the history of T. R. and his involvement with the Fullers, who founded the Long Island Rail Road. Image of Fuller and the Roosevelt's.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay -- Typhoid Mary
The Case of the Disappearing Cook / M. Sufrin. American Heritage, XXI-5; p.37-39; Aug. 70.
The story of Mary Mallon, who would go down in history as Typhoid Mary. She worked as a cook for several high-class families and each one fell ill shortly after her arrival and taking new positions. It took years to track and imprison her as a danger to public health. She eventually was released and forced to live in seclusion by and at the expense of the State of New York. Oyster Bay is mentioned because she worked for a family that fell ill shortly after her arrival, and triggered an investigation into Mary Mallon's past.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Oyster Bay -- Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No



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