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Roslyn
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Roslyn -- Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Roslyn -- Dutch
Dutch Were Sturdy Islanders / E. Wagner. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 4; p.5-6, 18; Apr. 1939.
A detailed article about the founding of Long Island, through the Dutch perspective. The article also goes into detail about a few specific towns and an anthological perspective on how they lead their lives.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Roslyn -- George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th of April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Roslyn -- Historic Buildings
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable) districts.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Roslyn -- Historic Buildings
Historic Preservation on Long Island / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.1-8; Spring 1964.
A very short article with heavy detail about what buildings and historic places on Long Island that should be preserved. Special notes are made for specific towns. Roslyn is noted for it's preservation society, the Landmark Society, and it's work.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Roslyn -- Historic Buildings
Nassau's Oldest House, Time Has Passed It By / K. Lonetto. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.11; Oct. 1984.
A history of one of the oldest surviving houses in Long Island, which was built in 1680. It has been restored and now exists in Roslyn, as a museum. Image of: Van Nostrand-Starkins House.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Roslyn -- Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water- way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Roslyn -- Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No



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