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Sag Harbor
Greenport 100 Years Old / M. Hartley. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 8; p.12; Oct. 1938.
A brief article celebrating the 100 years since Greenport's founding. It discusses the harbor, the founding in 1838, and the modern view of Greenport.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Sag Harbor
Life of The Early Islanders (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.45, 46-47, 57-58; Mar. 1943.
A very detailed article about the beginnings of Long Island. The article describes the founding through present day. The second part of the article focuses on the later part of the 1600s through the late 1800s. It also focuses on the governmental and architectural uniqueness of the town.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Sag Harbor
Meigs' Raid on Sag Harbor / H. Horton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 7; p.155-156; Jul. 1941.
A short article about the Jonathan Meigs raid on Sag Harbor on April 25th, 1777. While it's a small note in the Revolutionary War, it's a large part of the history of Sag Harbor and Long Island. An image of Brick Kiln Road and a small brick building that served as the British hospital during the raid.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Sag Harbor
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Sag Harbor
Sag Harbor, Island Cinderella / H. Weeks. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.7-8, 15-16 (and insert); Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about the architecture of Sag Harbor, especially the churches that are found all over town. The Dutch influence is easy to find, as well as the Whaling influence, is found throughout the architecture. Most of the buildings exist from the early 18th and 19th centuries, and were forged by hand. The article includes images of: The Whaling Church and the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Sag Harbor
The Herald House, Sag Harbor / N. Willey. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 5; p.95-96; May. 1940.
The article gives a short account of the history of the Harold House in Sag Harbor. The article is primarily on the details of the house itself, not it's role in history, through that information is present. The house is now a museum.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Sag Harbor -- African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Sag Harbor -- Church history
Whalers Church to be Restored / H. Weeks. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 11; p.217; Nov. 1944.
A short article about the restoration efforts of Whaler's Church in Sag Harbor. The entire focus of the article is on the restoration effort, and does not discuss any history of the church.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Sag Harbor -- Historic Buildings
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable districts).
Illustrations or Maps: No


Sag Harbor -- Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Sag Harbor -- Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water- way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Sag Harbor -- Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Sag Harbor -- Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part 1) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 2; p.40-49; Spring 1963.
A short article about the pirates that ran the waters between Long Island and other parts of the world. The most famous pirate noted is Captain Kidd, whom was friends with the wealthiest family on the island, the Gardiners. He traveled to several towns in Long Island, picking up or dropping off his treasures as he chose.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Sag Harbor -- Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part II) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.28-38; Winter 1964.
A continuation of the "Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933" where the author focus the pirates that came after Captain Kidd. These pirates, while minor on a national level, reeked havoc on Long Island they and became famous for their connections with both towns and the wealthy land owners. Captain James Gillam is among the captains listed.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Sag Harbor -- Sailing Ships
Southampton's Strange Shipyard / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 12; p.227-228; Dec. 1945.
A short article about the building of two ships in the streets of Southampton. The ships were overly large and were linked to black market trading after disembarking from Long Island. One of the influential people in the creation of these boats is William French. They traveled around Long Island before leaving for Spain.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes


Sag Harbor -- Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No


Sag Harbor -- Whaling
Whaling is Different Today / R. Coburn. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 1; p.5, 7-8; Jan. 1945.
A detailed article about whaling life on the various parts on Long Island, and how it has changed over the course of it's history. The primary focus of the article is on the modern view on whaling, and what kind of whales are hunted for off the cost of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes



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